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Found 17 results

  1. I was fiddling in the loft and found this in my stash. It surprises me as it wasn't on my inventory. As nobody has picked the Heinkel 111 up yet, I guess I better build it. I hope to get my Tiger Moth and Ju 188 done before the end of the month so I can then knock this one out. Now the question arises 'which aircraft to depict'? There weren't any decals in the box which is a shame as I was hoping to do the Romanian one. Has anyone got these decals? It looks complete
  2. Some ideas in case someone is interested in very real Luftwaffe models. The subject that deserves a closer look is the famous Kampfkopf. The glass monster, where you have to be very careful anyway during modelling, both when gluing and when painting. After seeing beautiful models over and over again, I notice that essential details are completely ignored due to the ignorance of the manufacturer and the modeller. I was lucky to have both a Ju-88 pilot and a pilot who had instructors who flew with the He-111 in my environment. When I started modeling, I built these types, but I lacked the ability to incorporate these details. In the case of the He-111, it should be noted that a flight could quite well proceed in such a way that the entire bow pulpit ran up from the inside and became milky opaque. That's why you have a long, narrow ( almost rectangle) window in the upper left above the pilot that can be opened like a windshield. The pilot had to stand so that the control horn can be extended, and then he had to steer the aircraft while standing upright and while wearing a leather hood and glasses. Imagine that! Like on a ship! Well, with the Ju-88, He-111 and Do-17/217 etc. Have you ever imagined how pleasantly warm it had to be when a machine like this was in Sicily? And later that day they had to take a seat inside with the flying suit. Something very warm is an understatement. So there were a lot of curtains. Already seen? Well. Now in general these little things are forgotten in museums or simply not done. They're on the same topic in case you come across a Bf-108. Elly Beinhorn also wrote about it in her book. Well, you are sure to find more interesting results in your literature. I'm curious when I'll find a Ju-88 with curtains in the forum for the first time. Just to show you what I want to explain: Ju 88 first Ju 88 second Happy modelling
  3. I chose this 1/100 scale kit, originally produced in 1956 to show where plastic models of the venerated Heinkel 111 first originated. There is no disguising the fact that it is wildly innacurate. However, moulded in this multi-coloured plastic gives it a certain charm. As you can see, perhaps the worst part is the iconic glazed nose. I have been thinking that populating it with a couple of figures might help.
  4. Heinkel He 111-H3 Romanian AF (48266) 1:48 ICM via Hannants The He.111 was originated in secrecy, disguised as a civilian transport in the mid-30s, but once Nazi Germany came out of the closet and disregarded the Versailles agreement, it immediately became clear that they were rearming in a major way. The early civilian and military variants had a more traditional stepped canopy, and there is a famous piece of film that is used and reused in documentaries showing a D or "Dora" variant dropping bombs during the Spanish Civil War as part of the Condor Legion, which was Hitler's proving ground for his new designs and Blitzkreig tactics. Various revisions followed until the P, which introduced the now-iconic stepless fully glazed cockpit, which improved both aerodynamics and the pilot's situational awareness. The P series saw limited action in WWII as it was replaced by the more competent H variant, substituting Junkers Jumo 211 engines, detuned to give it the throbbing beat that was to be heard over Britain almost until the end of the war. The H-3 had an improved version of the engine and increased numbers of machine guns for self-defence. As is often the case with wartime development, the end of the Battle of Britain saw the introduction of the H-4 with better engines and external bomb racks. The H series continued until the H-23, although there were also a number of side-projects such as the Z, Zwilling with two airframes joined by a central aerofoil and sporting five engines, designed to tow the Me.321 Gigant glider. The Kit We have only had one choice if we wanted a 1:48 He.111, although it has been in various boxes over the years. It's not a bad kit, but this is a 100% new tooling by ICM, who have raised their game substantially over the recent years. The kit arrives in their lidded top-opened with a glossy card lid and painting to top it off, with seven sprues in medium, grey styrene, one in crystal clear styrene, an instruction booklet in line-drawn colour, and a long decal sheet that can be found ensconced within the booklet. On opening the bags, it is very apparent that this is a modern tooling, with lots of lovely details, crisp moulding, and some very clever engineering on display. The cockpit and partial interior will require some thought for painting, but if you get the order right, you should minimise the swearing when you have to reload the airbrush for the Nth time. Construction starts with the two wing spar parts, which are separated by the gear bay roof assemblies and a walkway part. Additional detail is added to the bulkheads along with the fuselage walkways and a smaller bulkhead toward the tail, with the lower portion of the mid-upper "turret" ring attached to the floor. The cockpit floor is then assembled with rudder pedals, instrument panels, seat and control linkages, slotting into the front spar once finished. An additional chair and the overhead instrument panel are installed later in the build. As a prelude to closing up the fuselage, the tail wheel is fitted together, which has the wheel moulded-in, and consists of three parts. Preparation of the fuselage halves involves adding the inserts into the wing roots and making good the join; inserting the paired side windows; adding ammo can racks; radio panel; the pilot's control column, and more glazing in the ventral gondola. The spar/cockpit assembly is then fitted to the starboard fuselage half and the port side is added along with some glue. The rudder is separate and fits to the fin with actuators, then the missing fuselage panels between the spars are added, which of course will need painting and fettling in if you're bothered about the "endoscope brigade". The mid-upper insert is designed to cater for different "turret" installations, and has a lovely serrated ring moulded-in, with controls and bracing strut added before it is installed into the fuselage opening, closing off much of the rear fuselage. You can pose the bomb bay open or closed by selecting one of the two panels, one of which has opening for the bomb bay, where the bombs are suspended tail-first in a framework that is peppered with lightening holes so that the included bombs are visible within. The bombs themselves are built up from two halves that have two fins moulded-in, and a single part that fits on the tail forming the other two fins in a cruciform layout. To these are added stiffening brackets, with four bombs in total to make. With the bomb bay finished, it is inserted into the fuselage from below, filling yet another gap in the skin. Even if you are leaving the bays closed, the bomb bay can be seen from the side windows, so it's best to build that assembly and install it anyway to prevent that section from being see-through from the sides. At this point the wings are begun, with the lower sides added to the fuselage/spar assembly first. The ailerons are separate, and are built up before the uppers are added, as are the elevators, and the two engines, which are provided in their entirety, along with much of the ancillary equipment and engine mounts. The completed Jumo 211s are fitted to the front of the spars and depending on whether you want to display them or not, and then enclosed by cowling panels, radiators and the intake/outlet ramps. The bottom cowlings can be split to reveal the engine detail, which is a good way of showing off the detail without ruining the lines of the aircraft. The upper wings and ailerons are fitted, the remaining cowling panels with the exhausts are added, with the latter having a decent indent at the tip to simulate being hollow, and finally the nose glazing, which has a machinegun and the aforementioned overhead instrument panel, which is moulded in clear styrene and is provided with a decal for the instruments. The nose "cone" is a separate clear part, and it too is fitted with a machine gun with a choice of single or twin drum mags and dump bag for the spent brass. Another two MGs are fitted to the front and rear glazing on the gondola, and the mid-upper gun is added to the turret ring, along with the protective clear shroud at the front. The main wheels are each built up from two halves, and placed between the twin legs that have the main retraction jacks moulded in, and secured with a number of cross-braces between the two legs. An additional ram is fitted within the bay, attached to the rear cross-brace. The gear bay doors fit to the bay sides with large tabs, as do the bomb bay doors if you are using them, and these last parts have the correctly separated four "petals" that are seen on the real thing, rather than a single panel. The props are made up from a single part with two part spinner and back plate, which fit onto the engine's output shaft through the vented front of the cowlings. Markings There are two decal options included in the box as suggested by the tite for the Romanian Air Force. both in the Green/Brown/Grey camo scheme, . From the box you can build one of the following: He.111H-3, 5th Bomber Group, Romanian Air Force, Bessarabia, Summer 1941 He.111H-3, 5th Bomber Group, Romanian Air Force, Russia, Late 1942 Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas with a few exceptions around some of the fuselage codes. These can easily be cut off before they are applied however, so it's not an issue. The triple white bars on decal option 2 can be seen in some photos (Google image search "he 111 1a+da"), and those on the starboard wing appear to have a substantial amount of overspray around the trailing rectangle, which could be fun to replicate yourself. Conclusion The He.111 is a truly iconic shape, and we're long overdue a new tooling of the type in this scale. ICM have done a great job of it by the looks of things. Very highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Forget masking cockpits There is a simple method avoiding all the trouble with masking cockpits! All you need is a transparent decal sheet, the "magic" Future. You paint or airbrush a small sheet of transparent decal - best with acrylic colors. Be careful if you use a paintbrush and enamel colors - it may dissolve the surface of the decal! The Layer of paint should not be too thick - else the decal gets to stiff. After drying you cut off small stripes of the painted decal. I would recommend to apply Future at the clear parts of the cockpit. After removing the decal strips from the backing paper with a small paintbrush and a little bit of Future you apply these on the cockpit. Carefully remove excess water. Here some pictures of my 1/72 Revell/Hasegawa Heinkel He 111 Bomber which crashed from 2 m height. The Cockpit broke in to parts - now repaired. The He111 has a real challenging Cockpit! the engine is still broken off. Hope you find this tip useful! Cheers! Andreas
  6. Okay, it was a brilliant bit of plastic that I managed to butcher into a semblance of an aeroplane. Built OOB from the Airfix BoB 75th anniversary set. The kit was great. So I decided to try using some previously untried techniques (as I'm a stone-age modeller) such as using paint masks, etc. The glazing masks were fiddly but effective (pity they are only single use). The camo masks were not so effective. I've done better with making tape and careful cutting using a scalpel. And I had a big fight with the Xtracolour paints. My paint of choice let me down this time. Or I let it down. RLM 65 came out wrong. So a second coat from a brand new tin hid the worst. And I use a hairy stick. None of that fancy airbrushing for me. The upper surface contrast I expected was just not here. (The pictures don't help). And yes, I mixed and stirred and mixed and stirred. The masks left demarcation edges, and thanks to micro mesh I managed to reduce these to a minimum. But it ended up after months of sitting idle on the workbench looking vaguely like an He 111. Shame the set did not come with all the detailed decals. But hey-ho, it saved me hours of fiddling with microscopically small details. Lessons leaned. Paint the inside frames of the fuselage windows (I did like the 'plug-in' style) before putting them in place. As a result I have a lovely grey plastic surround to them where an RLM 02 surround would have been acceptable. And I was reluctant to lever the carefully inserted and masked plastic out to recover the error! You will have guessed by now that I'm not a rivet counter. Leave the masks on the glazing until AFTER I have used the matting finish. Do not slavishly follow the Airfix instructions on assembly of the undercarriage. That was a struggle, or I just got it wrong. Probably the latter. Other wise it was great and I sadly made a mess of what Airfix supplied. Sorry guys. Maybe I'll do better next time. I must remember that this is a pastime I am supposed to enjoy.
  7. Heinkel He 111H-6 (48262) 1:48 ICM The He.111 was originated in secrecy, disguised as a civilian transport in the mid-30s, but once Nazi Germany came out of the closet and disregarded the Versailles agreement, it immediately became clear that they were rearming in a major way. The early civilian and military variants had a more traditional stepped canopy, and there is a famous piece of film that is used and reused in documentaries showing a D or "Dora" variant dropping bombs during the Spanish Civil War as part of the Condor Legion, which was Hitler's proving ground for his new designs and Blitzkreig tactics. Various revisions followed until the P, which introduced the now-iconic stepless fully glazed cockpit, which improved both aerodynamics and the pilot's situational awareness. The P series saw limited action in WWII as it was replaced by the more competent H variant, substituting Junkers Jumo 211 engines, detuned to give it the throbbing beat that was to be heard over Britain almost until the end of the war. The H-3 had an improved version of the engine and increased numbers of machine guns for self-defence. As is often the case with wartime development, the end of the Battle of Britain saw the introduction of the H-4 with better engines and external bomb racks. The H-6 had improvements in design. The Jumo 211 F-1 engine gave it increased. Defensive armament was upgraded with one 20 mm MG FF cannon in the nose, one MG 15 in the ventral turret, and in each of the fuselage side windows, some carried tail-mounted MG 17s. The performance of the H-6 was also improved; he climb rate was higher and the machine could reach a slightly higher ceiling. Overall weight of the H-6 increased to 14,000 kg (30,600 lb). The Kit This is an adaptation of the new tool kit from ICM which we reviewed here. who have raised their game substantially over the recent years. The kit arrives in their lidded top-opened with a glossy card lid and painting to top it off, with 11 sprues in medium, grey styrene, and two in crystal clear styrene, an instruction booklet in line-drawn colour, and a long decal sheet that can be found ensconced within the booklet. On opening the bags, it is very apparent that this is a modern tooling, with lots of lovely details, crisp moulding, and some very clever engineering on display. This version also includes torpedoes which the variant could use. Construction starts with the two wing spar parts, which are separated by the gear bay roof assemblies and a walkway part. Additional detail is added to the bulkheads along with the fuselage walkways and a smaller bulkhead toward the tail, with the lower portion of the mid-upper "turret" ring attached to the floor. The cockpit floor is then assembled with rudder pedals, instrument panels, seat and control linkages, slotting into the front spar once finished. An additional chair and the overhead instrument panel are installed later in the build. As a prelude to closing up the fuselage, the tail wheel is fitted together, which has the wheel moulded-in, and consists of three parts. Preparation of the fuselage halves involves adding the inserts into the wing roots and making good the join; inserting the paired side windows; adding ammo can racks; radio panel; the pilot's control column, and more glazing in the ventral gondola. The spar/cockpit assembly is then fitted to the starboard fuselage half and the port side is added along with some glue. The rudder is separate and fits to the fin with actuators, then the missing fuselage panels between the spars are added, which of course will need painting and fettling in if you're bothered about the "endoscope brigade". If you are intending to fit the tail armament option then the tail cone will need to be sawn off and the new one added. The mid-upper insert is designed to cater for different "turret" installations, and has a lovely serrated ring moulded-in, with controls and bracing strut added before it is installed into the fuselage opening, closing off much of the rear fuselage. You can pose the bomb bay open or closed by selecting one of the two panels, one of which has opening for the bomb bay, where the bombs are suspended tail-first in a framework that is peppered with lightening holes so that the included bombs are visible within. With the bomb bay finished, it is inserted into the fuselage from below, filling yet another gap in the skin. Even if you are leaving the bays closed, the bomb bay can be seen from the side windows, so it's best to build that assembly and install it anyway to prevent that section from being see-through from the sides. Racks for either bombs or torpedoes are added to the underside. The bombs themselves are built up from two halves that have two fins moulded-in, and a single part that fits on the tail forming the other two fins in a cruciform layout. To these are added stiffening brackets, with two bombs in total to make externally or two torpedoes. These are two part main bodies with main propeller and a 6 part tail to be made up and added. At this point the wings are begun, with the lower sides added to the fuselage/spar assembly first. The ailerons are separate, and are built up before the uppers are added, as are the elevators, and the two engines, which are provided in their entirety, along with much of the ancillary equipment and engine mounts. The completed Jumo 211s are fitted to the front of the spars and depending on whether you want to display them or not, and then enclosed by cowling panels, radiators and the intake/outlet ramps. The bottom cowlings can be split to reveal the engine detail, which is a good way of showing off the detail without ruining the lines of the aircraft. The upper wings and ailerons are fitted, the remaining cowling panels with the exhausts are added, with the latter having a decent indent at the tip to simulate being hollow, and finally the nose glazing, which has a machinegun and the aforementioned overhead instrument panel, which is moulded in clear styrene and is provided with a decal for the instruments. The nose "cone" is a separate clear part, and it too is fitted with a machine gun with a choice of single or twin drum mags and dump bag for the spent brass. Another two MGs are fitted to the front and rear glazing on the gondola, and the mid-upper gun is added to the turret ring, along with the protective clear shroud at the front. A different nose cone is provided if using the heavier armament and a different underside blister noses is included. A new clear rear blister nose is also included in the new box. A new open or closed top blister is also included. The main wheels are each built up from two halves, and placed between the twin legs that have the main retraction jacks moulded in, and secured with a number of cross-braces between the two legs. An additional ram is fitted within the bay, attached to the rear cross-brace. The gear bay doors fit to the bay sides with large tabs, as do the bomb bay doors if you are using them, and these last parts have the correctly separated four "petals" that are seen on the real thing, rather than a single panel. The props are made up from a single part with two part spinner and back plate, which fit onto the engine's output shaft through the vented front of the cowlings. Markings There are four decal options included in the box, all of which share the same RLM70/71 splinter pattern over RLM65 with the unit markings and codes to differentiate between them. From the box you can build one of the following: He.111H-6 3/KG.26 Norway Summer 1941 He.111H-6 Stab I/KG.26. Bardufoss, Norway, July 1942 He.111H-6 8/KG.53, Poland 1941 (Yellow Eastern Front Markings) He.111H-6 7./KG.27, Russia, November 1941, Temp white camo over topsides. Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas with a few exceptions around some of the fuselage codes. These can easily be cut off before they are applied however, so it's not an issue. No swastickers are provided so the modeller will have to source these. Conclusion The He.111 is a truly iconic shape, and we're long overdue a new tooling of the type in this scale. ICM have done a great job of it by the looks of things. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Hello Finally I had some time to continue the work on my Ost-Front scene. I've finished the models some time ago: Ju 87G-2 Stuka 'Kanonen Vogel' and Heinkel He 111 H-6. Both in 1:72 scale. Now it's the time to build the diorama for them. The plan is something like that: So, here is what I've done so far: Ju 87G-2 Stuka 'Kanonen Vogel' from Academy Heinkel He 111 H-6 from Revell Perspex box base with both of them arranged: Some SC250 bombs from Czech Masters (6) and one left from Messerschmitt Bf-109 kit: Some SC1000 bombs. Four again from Czech Masters and two from the Heinkel kit. They are a little bit bigger. Not sure which are in correct scale but I've decided to use all of them. The sledges to transport the bombs I've made from matches. Cut, glued, filed, airbrushed, drybrushed and finally weathered with washes. Here is how they look with the bombs: And finally Kettenkrad to tow the sledges and Kubelwagen for pilots (who are not ready yet). Both from Academy kit. The diorama will have some boxes, barrels etc. plus of course ground crew servicing the planes and the pilots resting and waiting for the mission. Thanks for watching.
  9. I've just completed my 1:72 Heinkel He 111 from Revell, a second part for the diorama (the first part was this Stuka). It was very nice build without the major problems. In fact the set is so good that there were no problems at all. You can see the progress here Here are some pictures of the finished model. More when the diorama is finished.
  10. He 111H-6 Update sets & masks - For Airfix Kit 1:72 Eduard The new Great Wall Hobby kit is a good one, however Eduard are along as always offering their update sets for the kit. Here we have 3 sets; Update, flaps and seatbelts. Interior Set (72574) This is one brass fret and one nickel one. The coloured parts on the nickel fret are mainly for the cockpit including the main instrument panels, side panels and controls. As the interior of the aircraft is very busy there are a myriad of parts supplied in this set which include numerous side panels, radio sets, ammuntion storage, internal supports, seats, and controls. Exterior Set (72634) This is one brass fret which provides details for the exterior of the aircraft, and weapons parts. New air filter parts, coolers and their flaps are provided, brake lines are added tot he main gear legs along with various small parts & linkages . New undercarrige bays are provided. New aerial mounts are provided, as are links for the flaps. Finally parts are provided for the carried torpedo. Bomb Bay (72635) This is one large brass fret which provides a complete new bomb bay for the aircraft. This provides the vertical guides and supporting structure inside the central bomb bay. Seatbelts (73573) This small fret provides belts for the front seats of the aircraft. These are the new Steel belts from Eduard. They are etched from 0.1mm sheet, which looks like stainless steel because it doesn't rust, these new belts combine the best of both worlds. The resulting etch is thin at around 0.06mm, and the paint that has been applied after etching is included in that thickness. The paint itself seems to be more flexible too, and the designs have added details such as shadows printed near buckles and joints to give an added depth to the design. They appear less susceptible to fatigue and will stand up to repeated movements, and can be posed much more realistically due to the ease of bending of the surface. The paint is also a lot less likely to flake off at a sharp bend, which is a worry for standard PE belts. Masks (CX467) Given the extensive glazing on the He 111 mask would be a real help. Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. Wheel Masks are also supplied. Conclusion These sets will enhance your He 111 model. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  11. Evening, while building my 1/72 B29, I started looking over my shelf of doom as a distraction. Doing that I found the Revell boxing of the Hasegawa He 111 H-6 and ICM He 70 F-2, both in 1/72. One half painted, one ready for painting, I started thinking how to paint them, actually I thought a of a What If to let them stand out of the crowd somehow. I thought of asking here, if anyone knows interesting, colorful, distinctive or somehow different paintjobs or camoflages. I for example thought of a Japanese He 70 or a post-war Isreali He 111 but maybe you know something better. Thank you In advance Levin
  12. A mostly complete He 111 P-2 (5J+CN), Werknummer 1526, is on display at the Royal Norwegian Air Force Museum at Gardermoen. Pics thanks to Mikemx. This is one of only 4 German built aircraft left.
  13. This is my first completed build for 2016 - the 1/32nd scale Heinkel He 111 P-1 from Revell. I started this back in the summer of 2015 as a 'pick it up and do a bit as you fancy it' build, and I've been working on it on and off for the last 6 months or so. I have built it more or less out of the box, but I did add some Eduard detailing for the seatbelts and instruments etc, as well as some brass barrels for the guns as the kit's are undersized. It was an absolute joy to build and went together beautifully - very little filler was needed and it proved to be a completely trouble-free project. The only tricky and more time consuming part was the extensive glazing which required careful masking and painting both inside and out. All that glass and no protection 'up front' makes you realise how exposed these chaps were when a fighter sprayed that area - it doesn't bear thinking about the carnage that would ensue in the nose when under attack. Xtracolour enamels were used throughout, with the kit decals also being used which were flawless. The swastika was not included so this was sourced from an Xtradecal sheet, and the whole paint job was finished off with a spray of Humbrol flat varnish. If you're thinking of venturing into larger scale models I'd heartily recommend this kit - it was an absolute joy. Heinkel He 111 P-1 of III.KG 27, Delmenhorst, Germany, Summer 1940. It's also BIG - the He 111 is considerably larger than I had anticipated (span of just over 74ft) and not much smaller than a B-17. Make sure you leave plenty of shelf space! Tom
  14. Hello Chaps, I'm back to share with you my final build of 2015, that I completed the morning of New Years Eve. This was a gift from a fellow YouTube modeler, who sent it to me because he knew that I was enjoying building Luftwaffe aircraft during the last 8 months, but hadn't yet built a bomber, and that the Heinkel He 111 was a plane that I really wanted to get my hands on. This is a discontinued kit from 1994, but has been re-released under the Revell banner. For a 22 yr old kit, it has some reasonable details, including recessed panel lines on the exterior surfaces and three figures: a officer, pilot and bombardier/front gunner.. I did have a couple of fit issues though: one of the wing root to fuselage joints had a gap of around 1.0mm that I had to fill, and, the profile of the greenhouse canopy was wider than the profile of the fuselage body on both sides. I therefore had to carefully file the clear part down without damaging the window areas. Also, the original decal sheet was yellowed and the moment I put decals into water, they disintegrated. My friend who sent me the kit had suspected this might happen, so he included a more up to date set of decals, although they had markings for two H-6 version Heinkel's that carried two torpedoes and also didn't have the fully enclosed dorsal gun turret, but the open style with the windshield facing forward to protect the gunner from airflow. This newer decal sheet didn't include decals for the V1 rocket, of which there were 24 stencils intended to go onto the rocket on the original sheet. I therefore decided that this was going to be a non-existent, what if, fun build. I mixed some of the fuselage side markings from the decal sheet to spell 1H+AM, which was associated to a Junkers Ju 88 and which I thought appropriate at the time of building, as it was Christmas, and most people like a good Spiral Ham! With this being a large model at 1/48 scale, I thought that the two tone splinter camo was just too much green, and therefore broke the monotony of it up with a white tail band, which would have indicated that it operated in North Africa....again...accuracy isn't playing into this build...it's just for fun at this point in time. I have to say though, it was a good kit besides the outlined issues and I had a lot of fun building it! Enough waffling and onto the photos, I hope you like them Well there she is, I hope you like her as much as I enjoyed building her. Again, just like my Fw 190F-8 build, I haven't had the time to post my build on here, but I do have a introduction to the build video and 4 "Build Update" videos on my YouTube Channel, along with my "Final Reveal" video that are available to watch, should you be interested in all the stages from start until end of this build. Here are the links for the 5 videos associated to this build: Introduction Video Link- https://youtu.be/BRDvVv0aAS8 Build Update #1 Video Link- https://youtu.be/VCvq7-FxUxU Build Update #2 Video Link- https://youtu.be/wolvHNA4rZQ Build Update #3 Video Link- https://youtu.be/WPJQIszbQIs Build Update #4 Video Link- https://youtu.be/gSrM2QytLYc Final Reveal Video Link- https://youtu.be/l2BoXSWtHcE Thanks in advance for taking a look at this posting, for leaving comments and for watching any of the videos, should you do so, much appreciated! Until my next build thread begins, happy modeling, have fun and Happy New Year! Cheers Martin
  15. Hi guys here is a Heinkel He 111 H22 from Revell Monogram. It's in 1/48 scale and hase new prop's (RBS), a big edition set from eduard and self made exhausts. It is a nice kit to build. Here is the building thread. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234967990-heinkel-he-111-h22-update-19-10-2014-and-finished/ It was made for a friend of mine from IPMS Netherlands. Rene, I hope you like it. Here are the pictures. Cheers,
  16. Hello everyone, this is my first WIP here on Britmodeller, and a first serious build in years, so let's see how this goes.. :] I recently got myself an airbrush and had been trying it out on a discarded 1/32 Revell SBD-3 Dauntless just to be sure I have some idea about what I'm doing.. Also, I have little to none experience in washes and some other things, so this build will have a lots of first! Here goes.. Cockpit is assembled and painted a first coat.. After that the seat was added and small details painted.. I was interested to see how seatbelts will work so I made them out of masking tape..a little bit of detail is still needed, but that's good enough for now.. As I said, I have almost no experience with washes, so I wasn't sure how this will turn out..I started with the interior which will not be as visible as the cockpit.. I used black acrylic paint thinned with water and a soft brush to apply it.. Picture without wash is first, and the one with wash is second.. After that little struggle and a moment of 'Oh no what did I do' I used the new experience to carefully apply washes to cockpit.. I'm quite happy with how it turned out, probably because I was much more careful this time.. All in all, I think I'll use airbrush with slightly darker color next time for most of my interior shading.. You can also notice I didn't pay much attention to bomb bay when it comes to painting bombs and washes 'cause it almost won't be visible at all.. Oh, and the seatbelts still need a bit of work, though.. That's all for now, I'll post more as I progress, your thoughts and advices are welcome! :]
  17. Hello, I'm going to be finishing off my Heinkel 111 from the Obsolete GB. Build so far is here. This is a classic out of control project. My "list of things to finish" kept growing even though I was making progress. I think I have a good list now though, and I will try to stick to it! I had got to the point where I thought "I need to move the wings backwards and upwards, and mould a new canopy". Happy days. Regards, Adrian
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