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  1. Fiat CR.42CN Falco WWII Italian Night Fighter (32024) 1:32 ICM The Fiat CR.42 Falco (Falcon) was developed in the late 1930s at a time when the more modern monoplane fighters were starting to outstrip bi-planes in performance but it was felt they still had a place. The CR.42 was a development of the CR.32 which were used with success in the Spanish Civil War. The new aircraft would feature a supercharged radial engine and be of simple clean strong construction offering good manoeuvrability. The CR.42 was considered to be the best bi-plane available at the start of WWII although that in itself might be faint praise. Despite its apparent obsolescence the CR.42 would fight in every campaign with the Italian Forces and be exported to Belgium, Sweden, and Hungary. The CN version was developed as a Nightfighter with underwing spotlights and extended flame damping exhausts. The Luftwaffe would use the aircraft after taking over Italian examples following the 1943 armistice. Following this the Luftwaffe placed and order for 200 CR.42 LW, these were optimised for night harassment and operations against partisan forces mainly in the Balkans. The Kit This is a welcome new tool kit from ICM. The parts are crisp and well moulded consistent with ICMs modern tooling. This boxing brings up new parts for the Nightfighter versions. Depending on the decal option modelled there are parts for flame damping exhausts, and underwing target illuminating lights in pods. Construction starts with the cockpit, as with most fighters of the this era this is a tubular affair which sits into the fuselage. The base of the seat fits to the floor with the flight controls going in. The front bulkhead fits to this with the rudder controls attached to it. The rest of the frames then builds up around this with the back of the seat going in. Into the main fuselage the pilots headrest is fitted along with the instrument panel (instruments are provided as decals). Once these two parts are in the cockpit can be fitted in and the fuselage closed up. The decking in front of the cockpit can then be added. At the rear of the aircraft the rudder and tailplanes can then be constructed and added., with the tail wheel assembly going on under the tail. Moving to the front of the aircraft the detailed engine is built up. There are two banks of cylinders for the radial engine with an exhaust manifold and ignition harness. There are some slightly different parts for the different variants here, along with the different exhausts. The propeller hub attaches to the front and a full set of cowl flaps to the rear. There are sets for open and closed flaps. The cowl and covers can then be attached, though the covers can be left off to show the engine, The completed unit then attached to the front of the aircraft and the air filter then goes on. We now move onto the wing. The lower wings are two part left and right, with a single upper wing split top/bottom. There is one set of struts from each side of the fuselage, then two sets per wing. All fit into positive locating points. The top side ailerons are separate parts with their control horns being added. For the version with the light pods a small turbine attaches to the upperwing to supply power for the lights. Once the wings are on its time to fit the propeller and fixed under carriage. If the light pods are to be used hopefully you opened up the holes in the main lower wing! These can now be fitted. Decals Four options are provided for on the decal sheet: CR. 42CN, MM 75XX, 300 Sqn/167 Gruppo Autonomo Caccia Notturna, Grottaglie June 1943 (3 colour uppers with Black undersides) - as shown on the box art. CR.42CN, MM XXXX 377 Sqn Autonomo Inercettoir, Palermo 1942 (3 colour uppers with Black undersides). CR.43CN, MM 1928, 234 Sqn / Gruppo Autonomo Caccia Notturna, 1943 (Overall black) CR.42CN MM XXXX, Tenente Luigi Torchio, 377 Sqn Autonomo Inercettoir, Palermo 1943 (Overall black) The decals look nicely printed with no issues. Conclusion It is great to see ICM releasing new tools of aircraft like this in 1/32. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  2. These were kits that I didn't realise existed this time last year. They are also the first kits I have started and finished this year, less than four weeks from first post to final photos. Over the summer I was quite excited when I found the Abarth kit on eBay from a European seller at quite a reasonable price. As an aside it seems European sellers are quite often cheaper than British ones, sometimes enough to cancel out the more expensive postage costs. It wasn't until December or January that I saw a standard 500 kit come up on eBay (with a slightly silly buy-it-now price and I think it's still for sale with no price drop). The 500 kit I bought was a bit cheaper but did have a lot of parts off the sprues and although it was a bit of a gamble the seller was correct that it was complete. Building the two kits together helped provide a useful reference as many of the parts are identical so I could find the 500 part by comparing it to the equivalent from the Abarth kit. I've been fond of Fiat 500s ever since I knew what one was, my first car was the 500's boxy replacement, a Fiat 126 which was a lot of fun even if not as cute as the older model. Small Fiats also conjure up memories of holidays to Rome, where there are plenty of 500s in daily use in various states of repair. Anyway, I'm sure you want some pretty pictures. The body is Fiat Capri Blue, from a Halfords aerosol. I'm not sure if it's authentic for a 500, but it's a nice shade although it looks a bit lighter in photos. I wanted a dark blue to set of the bits of chrome and to contrast/compliment the red interior. Interior is Ford Rosso Red and Halfords Appliance White where it isn't body colour. I'm so glad I took the trouble to pick out the white piping on the seats. I was a little surprised to see that this was a feature on the 500. Engine bay. There isn't much in here but I've enhanced it with plug wires, pipes for the fuel lines and wire clips for the air cleaner. Underside, I added a little rust wash on the suspension and exhaust, more to tone down the colours than to make them look actually rusty. And on to the Abarth Body colour for this is Ford Dove Grey, again from Halfords spray can. I'm not sure if it's right although it looks quite close to the FIAT Abarth script on the decals. The instructions just suggested "light grey" without specifying a Tamiya product to reproduce the correct colour. With some kits Tamiya will either list a colour from its range or tell you which paint to mix in the correct proportions to get the "right" shade. The flared wheel arches glue to the standard 500 shell and are the most difficult part of the build. It took a bit of light filling to get them neatly fitted. I also wonder if I should have cut away the standard arches a bit underneath as the tyres barely have room to steer. The body side decals are a bit of a nightmare, they are in two parts, split at the trailing edge of the door, but really need to be in three pieces, I think. Plenty of setting solution was needed to get them to cling to the curves of the body. There are a few metal transfers on the Abarth and the only one that gave any trouble was the silver shield behind the scorpion badge on the engine cover. The Abarth dashboard is more detailed than the standard 500, it's a different moulding and there are more dials (each a separate decal and very fiddly) plus some rather lovely decals in front of the passenger seat. For some reason the engine cover doesn't want to open very far, which makes a bit of a nonsense of the wiring and plumbing I did. Maybe I should have gone for the classic Abarth "boot open" look after all? Over head view. Underside, showing the finned sump and twin exhaust as well as the "Carlos Fandango-style" tyres. The 500 in the garage. You can fit two 500s in a single garage. I would definitely class the standard 500 as one of the best kits I've assembled. It goes together so well that you never fight it and all your effort goes into getting a good finish and adding details. In fact I would go as far as to say that the 500 deserves to be regarded as a classic kit. In fact I've tracked down another 500 to build, probably with a right-hand drive conversion. RHD isn't a kit option (pity) but shouldn't be too hard to do. It would be a perfect kit for anyone who wants an introduction to building car kits. Here, if you are interested, is the build thread. Thanks for following along and all the encouragement.
  3. Fiat CR.42AS Falco WWII Italian Fighter Bomber (32023) 1:32 ICM The Fiat CR.42 Falco (Falcon) was developed in the late 1930s at a time when the more modern monoplane fighters were starting to outstrip bi-planes in performance but it was felt they still had a place. The CR.42 was a development of the CR.32 which were used with success in the Spanish Civil War. The new aircraft would feature a supercharged radial engine and be of simple clean strong construction offering good manoeuvrability. The CR.42 was considered to be the best bi-plane available at the start of WWII although that in itself might be faint praise. Despite its apparent obsolescence the CR.42 would fight in every campaign with the Italian Forces and be exported to Belgium, Sweden, and Hungary. The AS version was developed as a Fighter Bomber with the provision for 2 more guns and bomb racks. The as stood for "Africa Settentrionale". As well as the armament differences they were also fitted with sand filters for the engine. The Luftwaffe would use the aircraft after taking over Italian examples following the 1943 armistice. Following this the Luftwaffe placed and order for 200 CR.42 LW, these were optimised for night harassment and operations against partisan forces mainly in the Balkans. The Kit This is a welcome new tool kit from ICM. The parts are crisp and well moulded consistent with ICMs modern tooling. Construction starts with the cockpit, as with most fighters of the this era this is a tubular affair which sits into the fuselage. The base of the seat fits to the floor with the flight controls going in. The front bulkhead fits to this with the rudder controls attached to it. The rest of the frames then builds up around this with the back of the seat going in. Into the main fuselage the pilots headrest is fitted along with the instrument panel (instruments are provided as decals). Once these two parts are in the cockpit can be fitted in and the fuselage closed up. The decking in front of the cockpit can then be added. At the rear of the aircraft the rudder and tailplanes can then be constructed and added., with the tail wheel assembly going on under the tail. Moving to the front of the aircraft the detailed engine is built up. There are two banks of cylinders for the radial engine with an exhaust manifold and ignition harness. The propeller hub attaches to the front and a full set of cowl flaps to the rear. There are sets for open and closed flaps. The cowl and covers can then be attached, though the covers can be left off to show the engine, The completed unit then attached to the front of the aircraft and the air filter then goes on. We now move onto the wing. The lower wings are two part left and right, with a single upper wing split top/bottom. There is one set of struts from each side of the fuselage, then two sets per wing. All fit into positive locating points. The top side ailerons are separate parts with their control horns being added. Once the wings are on its time to fit the propeller and fixed under carriage. If the bomb racks are to be used hopefully you opened up the holes in the main lower wing! The racks and their four bombs can now be fitted. Decals Two options are provided for on the decal sheet: CR. 42AS Falco, 20 Sq., 46 Gruppo, 15 Stormo C.T., Libya 1942 (Green/Sand camo over grey) CR.42AS Falco, 45 Gruppo Ravenna, Italy 1942 (Smoke ring camo over grey) The decals look nicely printed with no issues. Conclusion It is great to see ICM releasing new tools of aircraft like this in 1/32. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Fiat CR.42 Falco in Foreign Services (D3206) 1:32 ICM via Hannants The brand new tool Falcos in 1/32 from ICM are really great kits. This set of additional decals has been produced for those aircraft which were used outside of Italy & Germany. The set arrives in a re-sealable foil bag stapled to a header card, with the decals covered by a sheet of translucent paper to keep moisture from damaging the carrier film. There are options for four airframes on the sheet, The decals are printed under ICM's banner, and are in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a commendably thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The few stencils included are crisply printed and legible under magnification, which is always a sign of good printing and attention to detail. From the sheet you can decal one of the following; V-205 Hungarian Air Force, 1939 V-266 Hungarian Air Force 1941 3 Sqn, II Groupe, 2 Regiment, Belgian Air Force 1940 9 Kungligq Gota Flygflottilj, Sweedish Air Force 1941 Conclusion A really nice set of decals that expand your options for the new kit. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Fiat CR.42 Falco WWII Italian Fighter (32020) 1:32 ICM The Fiat CR.42 Falco (Falcon) was developed in the late 1930s at a time when the more modern monoplane fighters were starting to outstrip bi-planes in performance but it was felt they still had a place. The CR.42 was a development of the CR.32 which were used with success in the Spanish Civil War. The new aircraft would feature a supercharged radial engine and be of simple clean strong construction offering good manoeuvrability. The CR.42 was considered to be the best bi-plane available at the start of WWII although that in itself might be faint praise. Despite its apparent obsolescence the CR.42 would fight in every campaign with the Italian Forces and be exported to Belgium, Sweden, and Hungary. The Luftwaffe would use the aircraft after taking over Italian examples following the 1943 armistice. Following this the Luftwaffe placed and order for 200 CR.42 LW, these were optimised for night harassment and operations against partisan forces mainly in the Balkans. The Kit This is a welcome new tool kit from ICM. The parts are crisp and well moulded consistent with ICMs modern tooling. Construction starts with the cockpit, as with most fighters of the this era this is a tubular affair which sits into the fuselage. The base of the seat fits to the floor with the flight controls going in. The front bulkhead fits to this with the rudder controls attached to it. The rest of the frames then builds up around this with the back of the seat going in. Into the main fuselage the pilots headrest is fitted along with the instrument panel (instruments are provided as decals). Once these two parts are in the cockpit can be fitted in and the fuselage closed up. The decking in front of the cockpit can then be added. At the rear of the aircraft the rudder and tailplanes can then be constructed and added., with the tail wheel assembly going on under the tail. Moving to the front of the aircraft the detailed engine is built up. There are two banks of cylinders for the radial engine with an exhaust manifold and ignition harness. The propeller hub attaches to the front and a full set of cowl flaps to the rear. There are sets for open and closed flaps. The cowl and covers can then be attached, though the covers can be left off to show the engine, The completed unit then attached to the front of the aircraft and the air filter then goes on. We now move onto the wing. The lower wings are two part left and right, with a single upper wing split top/bottom. There is one set of struts from each side of the fuselage, then two sets per wing. All fit into positive locating points. The top side ailerons are separate parts with their control horns being added. Once the wings are on its time to fit the propeller and fixed under carriage. If the bomb racks are to be used hopefully you opened up the holes in the main lower wing! The racks and their four bombs can now be fitted. Decals Two options are provided for on the decal sheet: CR. 42 Falco, 83 So., 18 Gruppo, 56 Stormo C.T., Ursel, Belgium, November 1940 CR.42 Falco, 75 Sq., 23 Gruppo Autonomo C.T., Sicily, June 1941 The decals look nicely printed with no issues. There is a small amendment sheet to correct an error in the numbers. Conclusion It is great to see ICM releasing new tools of aircraft like this in 1/32. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Fiat CR.42 LW With German Pilots (32022) 1:32 ICM The Fiat CR.42 Falco (Falcon) was developed in the late 1930s at a time when the more modern monoplane fighters were starting to outstrip bi-planes in performance but it was felt they still had a place. The CR.42 was a development of the CR.32 which were used with success in the Spanish Civil War. The new aircraft would feature a supercharged radial engine and be of simple clean strong construction offering good manoeuvrability. The CR.42 was considered to be the best bi-plane available at the start of WWII although that in itself might be faint praise. Despite its apparent obsolescence the CR.42 would fight in every campaign with the Italian Forces and be exported to Belgium, Sweden, and Hungary. The Luftwaffe would use the aircraft after taking over Italian examples following the 1943 armistice. Following this the Luftwaffe placed and order for 200 CR.42 LW, these were optimised for night harassment and operations against partisan forces mainly in the Balkans. The LW featured underwing racks for 4 50kgs bombs and a flame dampened exhaust. Of the 200 ordered 150 were built with 112 being accepted into service. The Kit This is a new tool kit from ICM, the original release was for the Italian Air Force, now followed up with this Luftwaffe release. The parts are crisp and well moulded consistent with ICMs modern tooling. Construction starts with the cockpit, as with most fighters of the this era this is a tubular affair which sits into the fuselage. The base of the seat fits to the floor with the flight controls going in. The front bulkhead fits to this with the rudder controls attached to it. The rest of the frames then builds up around this with the back of the seat going in. Into the main fuselage the pilots headrest is fitted along with the instrument panel (instruments are provided as decals). Once these two parts are in the cockpit can be fitted in and the fuselage closed up. The decking in front of the cockpit can then be added. At the rear of the aircraft the rudder and tailplanes can then be constructed and added., with the tail wheel assembly going on under the tail. Moving to the front of the aircraft the detailed engine is built up. There are two banks of cylinders for the radial engine with an exhaust manifold and ignition harness. The propeller hub attaches to the front and a full set of cowl flaps to the rear. There are sets for open and closed flaps. The cowl and covers can then be attached, though the covers can be left off to show the engine, The completed unit then attached to the front of the aircraft and the air filter then goes on. We now move onto the wing. The lower wings are two part left and right, with a single upper wing split top/bottom. There is one set of struts from each side of the fuselage, then two sets per wing. All fit into positive locating points. The top side ailerons are separate parts with their control horns being added. Once the wings are on its time to fit the propeller and fixed under carriage. Here the two different decal options feature slightly different parts so the modeller will need to pick their option. If going for the first decal option the long flame dampening exhausts will need to be added as well. If the bomb racks are to be used hopefully you opened up the holes in the main lower wing! The racks and their four bombs can now be fitted. Decals Two options are provided for on the decal sheet: 2./Nacht Schlacht Gruppe 9, Luftwaffe, Turin April 1944 Nacht Schlacht Gruppe 20, Luftwaffe, Strasbourg, October 1943 The decals look nicely printed with no issues. The Figures. Adding figures to a model gives it scale and realism that is hard to otherwise achieve, and often this is done with resin figures that are both expensive and for those not too keen on resin, this can be off-putting. Styrene figures however are simple to deal with, and with advances in sculpting and moulding techniques they are becoming more detailed and realistic as time passes (unless I paint them!). This new set from ICM, who have an excellent reputation for injection moulded figures, depicts a group of WWII Luftwaffe pilots stood relaxing. It arrives in a top-opening box, with the usual inner flap on top, with a single sprue of medium grey styrene inside, together with a sheet of instructions on glossy paper. The figures are moulded very crisply, and at 1:32 they are large enough to show off subtle details such as zipper pockets, boot details, insignia and other badges. Couple this with the breakdown of parts, and you will have a highly detailed figure once you have assembled them. The moulding seams are minimal, with slender sprue gates that also won't need much clean up, and the parts join at convenient breaks such as waists, trouser seams etc. One chap has his hands out in front of him, which necessitates his arms being separate from the elbow down, so a little filler may be needed there, but precious little if any should be required elsewhere. The two capped figures have their heads moulded as a single part, while the pilot with a peaked cap has a two part head, split at the cap brim, and each pilot has a side arm in holster that should be glued onto his waistband. Two of the figures have moulded-in life vests, while the third does not, instead having a ¾ length coat with fleecy collar turned up around his neck. Each of them have their faces turned subtly skywards as if they are watching their colleagues return after a mission, having already landed themselves. The instructions show the part numbers and paint codes on the same diagram, which relates to a table on the rear in Revell and Tamiya codes with the colour names in English and Cyrillic text. Conclusion It is great to see ICM releasing new tools of aircraft like this in 1/32, the addition of the figures makes for a good all round package. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Fiat CR.42 LW (32021) 1:32 ICM The Fiat CR.42 Falco (Falcon) was developed in the late 1930s at a time when the more modern monoplane fighters were starting to outstrip bi-planes in performance but it was felt they still had a place. The CR.42 was a development of the CR.32 which were used with success in the Spanish Civil War. The new aircraft would feature a supercharged radial engine and be of simple clean strong construction offering good manoeuvrability. The CR.42 was considered to be the best bi-plane available at the start of WWII although that in itself might be faint praise. Despite its apparent obsolescence the CR.42 would fight in every campaign with the Italian Forces and be exported to Belgium, Sweden, and Hungary. The Luftwaffe would use the aircraft after taking over Italian examples following the 1943 armistice. Following this the Luftwaffe placed and order for 200 CR.42 LW, these were optimised for night harassment and operations against partisan forces mainly in the Balkans. The LW featured underwing racks for 4 50kgs bombs and a flame dampened exhaust. Of the 200 ordered 150 were built with 112 being accepted into service. The Kit This is a new tool kit from ICM, the original release was for the Italian Air Force, now followed up with this Luftwaffe release. The parts are crisp and well moulded consistent with ICMs modern tooling. Construction starts with the cockpit, as with most fighters of the this era this is a tubular affair which sits into the fuselage. The base of the seat fits to the floor with the flight controls going in. The front bulkhead fits to this with the rudder controls attached to it. The rest of the frames then builds up around this with the back of the seat going in. Into the main fuselage the pilots headrest is fitted along with the instrument panel (instruments are provided as decals). Once these two parts are in the cockpit can be fitted in and the fuselage closed up. The decking in front of the cockpit can then be added. At the rear of the aircraft the rudder and tailplanes can then be constructed and added., with the tail wheel assembly going on under the tail. Moving to the front of the aircraft the detailed engine is built up. There are two banks of cylinders for the radial engine with an exhaust manifold and ignition harness. The propeller hub attaches to the front and a full set of cowl flaps to the rear. There are sets for open and closed flaps. The cowl and covers can then be attached, though the covers can be left off to show the engine, The completed unit then attached to the front of the aircraft and the air filter then goes on. We now move onto the wing. The lower wings are two part left and right, with a single upper wing split top/bottom. There is one set of struts from each side of the fuselage, then two sets per wing. All fit into positive locating points. The top side ailerons are separate parts with their control horns being added. Once the wings are on its time to fit the propeller and fixed under carriage. Here the two different decal options feature slightly different parts so the modeller will need to pick their option. If going for the first decal option the long flame dampening exhausts will need to be added as well. If the bomb racks are to be used hopefully you opened up the holes in the main lower wing! The racks and their four bombs can now be fitted. Decals Two options are provided for on the decal sheet: 2./Nacht Schlacht Gruppe 9, Luftwaffe, Turin April 1944 Nacht Schlacht Gruppe 20, Luftwaffe, Strasbourg, October 1943 The decals look nicely printed with no issues. Conclusion It is great to see ICM releasing new tools of aircraft like this in 1/32 Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 Fly Models Fiat G.50bis, built from the box. This is a multi-media kit consisting of plastic and resin parts. I painted with Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics, mixed to match the Italian AF colors. Photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. A full build review will appear in an upcoming edition of Scale Aviation Modeller International. Thanks for your interest, best greetings from Vienna! Roman
  9. Kora Models new 1/72nd Fiat CR.20 & CR.20bis kits: - ref. KPK7271 - Fiat CR.20 Italian Service Source: https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2858&zenid=if2eph2uu3n58sqeo815j2q8t7 - ref. KPK7272 - Fiat CR.20 Lithuanian Service early Source: https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2859&zenid=if2eph2uu3n58sqeo815j2q8t7 - ref. KPK7273 - Fiat CR.20 Lithuanian Service late Source: https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2860&zenid=if2eph2uu3n58sqeo815j2q8t7 - ref. KPK7275 - Fiat CR.20 Polish et Soviet Service Source: https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2862&zenid=if2eph2uu3n58sqeo815j2q8t7 - ref. KPK7276 - Fiat CR.20 & CR.20bis Hungarian Service Source: https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2863&zenid=if2eph2uu3n58sqeo815j2q8t7 - ref. KPK7277 - Fiat CR.20bi Italian Service Source: https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2864&zenid=if2eph2uu3n58sqeo815j2q8t7 - ref. KPK7282 - Fiat CR.20bis Austrian Service Source: https://www.lfmodels.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2865&zenid=if2eph2uu3n58sqeo815j2q8t7 V.P.
  10. Today, I quoted the following messages in the AvantGarde Model Kits (AMK) facebook page in the last topic about the Fouga Magister. Source: https://www.facebook.com/AMKHOBBY Conclusion: AMK has - most probably in 1/48th scale - a Fiat G-91 project in progress. As I can't imagine AMK only producing the G-91T or two seats version from the Gina... Long life to this project. V.P.
  11. With this plane, I completed the planned series of Italian hunting planes. The model is old, but I liked to work. The images are a bit of a bad quality, because, whatever I do, the pictures are dark. So much of me. Enjoy.
  12. Dear fellow Britmodellers, this is my 1/72 Sword Fiat G.55 of 2. Gruppo, 1. Squadriglia, flown by Ten. Drago at Cascina Vaga airfield, in May 1944. Built for the "Italian design special display" at the upcoming IPMS GoModelling show (March 9-10, 2019). I added photo-etch seatbelts from MPM and resin upgrades from AP Modely. Painted with Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics, representing the so-called "experimental splinter scheme". All photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. The round squadron batch on the nose has wrong color, it is too light. It should actually be dark green. Thank you very much for your interest in this topic. Best greetings from Vienna!
  13. I have been tortured for some time now that even though we have many Air Forces represented by our aircraft builds in this GB, we don't have any from the Regia Aeronautica - no aircraft collection is complete without those distinctive fascios on that gorgeous 3-colour honeycombe camouflage! I think that there is time to fit in this simple build - wheels up of course. This particular type of Fiat G.50 flew in the Battle of Britain, I believe. Also has a pretty extensive kit Check List included - just how many of these has this GB covered???
  14. I'd like to introduce to you the model I completed this morning. It is a model of the FIAT G.50 BIS plane that was part of the Yugoslav Air Force during the Second World War. The pictures are here and enjoy.
  15. SEM Model has just released a 1/72nd Fiat G-12T resin kit - ref. 72020 http://www.semmodel.altervista.org/en/g12t_en.html V.P.
  16. Hello! This is my second model car and once again I'm shooting for a post apocalyptic theme. I picked the Fiat Topolino because, well, it's super cute guys and it comes with a dog! The other selling point for me was the open roof, because I'm gonna shove a machine gun in there. I'm trying to go in a bit more prepared, so I treated myself to a copy of the 'Underhaulin' ebook from the Model Junkyard website (here: http://shop.modeljunkyard.com/product/underhaulin-junk-model-car-ebook/) for some guidance on doing more realistic weathering. I also got some much needed tools, a little cutter, some files, a new cutting mat etc. I've also been eyeing up some reference material. I seriously love how gross these cars look. Anyway, this is end game stuff, first things first is I need to build this thing. OK - So I want to put the car into a diorama setting so I picked a 1:35 model because all the diorama bits I found online were the same size. I got a damn cold shock when I opened the box and saw how small all the parts are. Intimidatingly small, I had no idea 1:35 was so tiny (yes I'm a hopeless newbie)! Content warning ahead, this build will suck, you will cringe at how bad I am at this. Here we go: I love how the body comes in a wee little box. Oh God, everything in wonky and covered in glue... I glued 3 out of 4 wheels so they don't spin..ahhhh. The photograph is quite forgiving, the myspace angel of the model car world if you will, because from any other angle this engine is real squiff. No wait, it looks squiff from here too. Sorry not a clear picture, but I got one 'part' all glued up ready for priming. And this is where I got to so far. Despite the cold rinse of fear I feel every time I have to pick up a microscopic part, I am having a total blast. Thanks for looking in
  17. I started this kit several years ago and unfortunately it found it's way to the shelf of doom. However, I dusted it of for just such a group build over on LSP as this is an aircraft far too nice looking to let sit half built...and it was an expensive model!! The kit has excellent detail straight out of the box, fit is ok, probably one of PCM's better, but it still requires a little elbow grease to get everything fitted nicely. The decal sheet is really nice, although I didn't use any of them, rather I used my compass cutter and some red stars from the spares box for the Syrian insignia. Overall I'm happy this is now done and sitting in the cabinet.
  18. It was already evoked in another (Blenheim) topic but I open a dedicated one. Hannants has just reissued the Classic Airframe CR.42 1/48th kit - ref. CF4157 Source: http://www.hannants.co.uk/product/CF4157 Box art V.P.
  19. Dear fellow Britmodellers, this is Sword's new 1/72 Fiat G.55, a kit presented at ModelBrno Show in June. I bought two boxes (each box containing two model kits) plus an aftermarket bag, containing resin seat, air intake, wheels and a vacu canopy. There's seven rather colorful marking options included. The model fits reasonably, but has shallow and washed-out details and soft panel lines in some areas. I found the assembly of the multi-part landing gear most challenging. I found an original photograph of this machine in "Aviazione Nazionale Repubblicana Italian Air Forces 1943 - 1945" by Richard Caruana (Modelaid). It confirms the White fuselage band, but the nose is not visible. Therfore, I went with Sword's instructions and painted the cowl yellow, and the spinner black & white. Main colors are RLM74/75/76 from Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics range. Photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. Thanks for your interest! Best wishes from Vienna Roman
  20. After a long battle Fiat is finished. Markings are my own work + old masks and decals from other models. Work in progress topic: http://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?showtopic=69719&hl= My Spanish collection - Cricket, Rata and Stuka. All beautiful in their own way :
  21. Finished this 1/72 Airfix Fiat G.50 today. Not sure what year my kit was from, I used a red stripe header bag release. It's entirely box stock with the exception of rescribing entirely with recessed panel lines and utilizing Sky Models aftermarket decals. I used a combination of Life Color, Italeri and Tamiya acrylics for paint. Also an artists oil panel line wash. It's a simple kit that was pretty cleanly molded and didn't require a great deal of fettling or filler to get ready for paint. Can't speak to accuracy, but I think it looks the part pretty well.
  22. I just got the urge to start on my Italeri 1/48 Fiat G.91 R1/3/4 "Gina" Kit 2645, and was wondering which aftermarket MB Mk.4 ejection seat would be correct for it. There are a number of different "variants" of the seat listed on Hannants, but none state that they are for the "Gina" I am thinking about doing the Portuguese R-4 variant, if that makes a difference in seat types. I was thinking about a cockpit set, but the Neomega and Small World Accessories cockpit seta are designed for the Heller & Ocidental Réplicas kits.. Larry
  23. Fiat CR.42 Falco. One of only four survivors Regia Aeronautica aircraft MM5701 is on display at the RAF Museum in Hendon, pics mine. This aircraft was captured on 11 November 1940 when it suffered an overheated engine and was forced to land on the beach at Orfordness, Suffolk. During the summer of 1941, it was flown by the Air Fighting Development Unit in mock combat. At the end of 1943 all testing was complete and the aircraft was marked for preservation.
  24. North American/Fiat QF-91C In 1961 the US DoD authorised the loan of two Luftwaffe Fiat G.91s for trials by the US Army. These were flown alongside Douglas A4D-2 Skyhawks and a Northrop N-156 (F-5 prototype). One was an Italian built G.91R-1, c/n 0052 that served with the Luftwaffe (BD+102) whilst the other was a German built G.91R-3 (c/n 0065) Luftwaffe EC+105. Although all three types were highly regarded none were deemed suitable for the role of Close Air Support or Forward Air Controller. Rumours abound that this decision was based on political grounds as the US Army could not be seen to fly foreign, (G91), Navy (A4D) or High performance USAF types (F-5) .... In 1965, however, with the US deeply embroiled in the Vietnam war the lack of a dedicated CAS aircraft to replace the venerable A-1 became far too visible. With the USAF reluctant to give up it's F-100s, even though they themselves needed replacement, the US Army dusted off it's reports and looked again at the G91, albeit now in the new Y variant, much favoured with it's twin engines and greater performance. New trials once again proved the validity of the dedign and with minor changes the type was authorised for production under license by North American Aviation. By 1970 the type had virtually replaced to A-1 and had also been adopted by the Airforce as a F-100 replacement. It went on to have an excellent service record both in combat and peacetime up until it's withdrawal in the late 1980s. It was not the end though and many airframes had a 2nd life awaiting for them. Post Vietnam cutbacks meant the conversion of F-102,106 and F-4s to the unmanned drone role was under threat. North American jumped in and utilised the experience acquired from the successful QF-86 and QF-100 programs to offer a lower cost solution. Slowly the ranks of F-91Cs sunning in the desert shrank as the majority of airframe not allocated to museums or the spares pile, were returned to flying condition with the ubiquitous bright red markings associated with their new lease of life. Some were mostly grey, others mostly green, a few had 2 or 3 colour camouflage, and a rare couple had special schemes. One thing was agreed upon by all - even the anonymous birds looked spectacular in their new feathers.
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