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  1. In the Czech Modelforum it's mentioned that after the 1/48th MiG-21, Spitfire and Bf.109 families, Eduard has as long term project the North American P-51 Mustang in the same scale (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974169-148-north-american-p-51-mustang-family-long-term-project-by-eduard/). But as another possible project, the Eduard's Boss, M. Sulc, has also mentioned the Hawker Hurricane! Maybe more news at the yearly Eduard's Novemberfest 2015. Wait and see. Source: http://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=68170&start=5865 Strange considering Airfix is working on a new tool 1/48th Hawker Hurricane kit (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234972972-airfix-148-hurricane-mk1/). If not a Hurri then another British subject Mr Sulc? Like a Hawker Tempest or a family of Griffon powered (Mk.XIV...) Spitfire by example... V.P.
  2. Nightfighter Hellcat Kit: Eduard 1/72 F6F-5N Nightfighter (Profipack) (#7079) Scale: 1/72 Paints: Vallejo Model Air, Vallejo Metal Colour Weathering: Flory Models, Tamiya & AK Marvellous kit built straight from the box. Painted with Vallejo Model Air colours and weathered using Flory Models washes Some extras with other Navy/Marines planes:
  3. I have to admit that I have feared the building of WWI kits almost my whole life, the reason being the rigging and recreating the wood these planes tend to be built from. But a Roden Polikarpov PO-2 cured me of my fear of wires (you only need patience and a pillow to punch when things go wrong), and wood is easy once you find the right technique and colours. So after getting brave I have finished two WWI kits, a Fokker D.VII and a Roland C.II, and they have both been among the most enjoyable kits I have ever built. My Vought XF5U-1 was started to do something else, but it has kind of stalled since I just can't stop thinking about these WWI planes. They can be a lot of work and a pain in the rear end, but they can also be incredibly rewarding and enjoyable to deal with. Not to mention the pride you feel when you actually manage to finish one without punching it through the wall in frustration! Well, enough rambling, this is my choice: Many people find the Pfalz D.III series to be beautiful airplanes, but I find them pretty "meh" and a bit boring to be honest. As did the pilots, they never were very popular. Hell, even the kit decals are a bit boring since it is a Weekend edition, but when I managed to track down the out of production Aeromaster decals depicting Max Holtzem's gorgeous plane, it was no turning back. The decals are still underway from Canada, but they should be in excellent condition so fingers crossed. Some brass barrels for the Spandaus are also heading over the North Sea as we speak. TL;DR I just started building a Pfalz.
  4. The mixture of mulled wine and single malt has addled my brain enough for me to attempt this little fella. It's from the Dual Combo boxing, so not sure which markings I'll go for yet, and I expect most of the etch will stay in the box. There is rigging, but it's minimal. Phew . p.s. this boxing does NOT come with mince pies, (or single malt unfortunately.)
  5. Source: http://www.arcforums.com/forums/air/index.php?/topic/308021-eduard-mig-21f-mig-21-uusum-in-48th-scale/ V.P.
  6. Eduard is to release a 1/48th Zlín Z-126 to Z-526 Trenér family. Source: https://www.facebook.com/EduardCompany/photos/a.122154977799458/3366784713336452 V.P.
  7. This was an enjoyable reboxed version of Eduard Hawker Tempest MkV as one of their limited editions. As I was going to do Sqn Ldr Roland Beaumont's aircraft it was fitting to also build Tamiya's sublime V, which Beaumont became a multiple ace in 'killing over 30 V1's in this particular aircraft. And side by side side with its older brother the Hawker Typhoon MkIb
  8. A6M2 Zero Upgrade Sets (For Eduard) 1:48 Eduard We’ve just reviewed Eduard’s brand-new kit of this iconic Japanese fighter here, and the first batch of resin updates here. The range has been further widened to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner, and now with a choice of medium for the cockpit panels. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), SPACE, Löök and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package that has type specific branding, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48050) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. The decals provide all the instrument panel and various boxes in interior green and with fantastic glossy instrument dials that have colourful faces where appropriate. The PE is pre-painted and includes additional parts for the cockpit, some of which duplicates the ProfiPACK PE, but also includes a set of four seatbelts that are arranged in their unusual “off-the-shoulder” style, much like a modern car seatbelt but with buckles rather than a clip. Löök Pre-Painted Resin Set (644128) This set contains a combination of pre-printed resin and PE parts to quickly and efficiently detail up your cockpit. There are two resin parts that make up the instrument panel and side console next to the pilot, with glossy faced dials already painted for you on interior green coated black resin. Two other literal black boxes are included for the sidewalls too, and these are also pre-painted for your ease. Additionally, the PE sheet contains a set of four-piece three-point belts for the pilot, and a double-bezel pair of instruments to fit in the top-centre of the instrument panel. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1238) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds additional perceived depth to the buckles and other furniture by using shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. The four parts fit together to provide a set of three-point belts in a style akin to a modern car belt, but with buckles. Masks Tface (EX821) Supplied on a larger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything to cover the exterior of the canopy, but also give you another set of masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the canopy interior with confidence and give your model that extra bit of realism. You also get a set of wheel masks to cut the demarcation between tyre and hub with ease. Review sample courtesy of
  9. A6M2 Update Sets (for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We’ve just reviewed the first boxing of this new kit, being the Dual Combo that goes by the name of Tora Tora Tora! here, and already Eduard have created a quantity of aftermarket sets for when excellent detail isn’t quite enough for you. Here are some of the first. A6M2 Seat (648698) This is another of Eduard’s new range of directly printed 3D sets, and it arrives in one of their usual shallow card Brassin boxes due to the shape of the seat. Due to their goal of lightening the aircraft as much as possible, the engineers provided the pilot with a perforated seat that offered no protection other than a mixture of thin stamped metal and fresh air. This set includes a 3D SLA printed seat that is attached by thin tendrils to a slim base at a curious angle that made photography a little difficult without the assistance of some Blutak. In addition, there is a set of STEEL pre-painted and nickel-plated seatbelts on a small fret in a separate bag that is backed by a piece of white card. After removing the fingers from the underside of the seat and sanding them flush, it is a simple drop-in replacement for the kit part that provides a fine and highly detailed seat that has more finesse than the kit original. A6M2 Wheels (648693) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set arrives in a flat pack and contains two main wheels with integrated hubs, and a slight weighting to the bottom of the tyres to give the impression of the airframe pressing down on them. It also includes a tail wheel strut with moulded-in cylindrical wheel, which is cast in a tougher white resin. The icing on the cake is a set of pre-cut kabuki tape masks that allows the modeller to cut the demarcation between tyre and hub effortlessly. A6M Undercarriage Legs BRONZE (648695) Inside the shallow Brassin box, the primary parts of this set are the two cast bronze gear legs, which are of high quality with little preparation work to do before they can be painted and added to your model. In addition, you get a full set of outer gear bay doors, which are cast at near scale thickness to give your Zero a more realistic look. A small hole should be drilled through the supports of the narrow leg door to permit the threading of a brake hose from your own 0.3mm wire stock, and you are shown how to do this in a small diagram on the instruction sheet. Conclusion The base kit is already highly impressive, and with the addition of some or all of these sets your Zero will really stand out from the crowd. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Eduard is to rebox in June 2021 the Revell's 1/72nd MRCA Tornado IDS/GR.1 - Gulf War RAF "Desert Babes" - kit - ref. 2137 Schemes: ZA452 - Gulf Killer, No. 20 Squadron, Tabuk AB, SaudiArabia, 1991 ZA465 - Foxy Killer, No. 16 Squadron, Tabuk AB, SaudiArabia, 1991 ZD715 - Luscious Lizzie!, No. 31 Squadron, Dhahran AB,Saudi Arabia, 1991 ZD719 - Check Six, No. 9 Squadron, Dhahran AB, SaudiArabia, 1991 ZD739 - Armoured Charmer, No. 9 Squadron, Tabuk AB, SaudiArabia, 1991 ZD809 - Awesome Annie, No. 617 Squadron, Muharraq AB, Bahrain,1991 ZD890 - No. 9 Squadron, Muharraq AB, Bahrain, 1991 ZD892 - Helen, No. 617 Squadron, Muharraq, Bahrain, 1991 Source: https://www.eduard.com/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2021/info-eduard-2021-05-enrr.pdf V.P.
  11. P-51D-20 Mustang Weekend Edition (84176) 1:48 Eduard The P-51D was developed by the North American Aviation company as a possible fighter for Great Britain, but due to the poor performance of the original Allinson engine it wasn’t all that good, especially at high altitude. Luckily they decided to try strapping a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine to the airframe and it brought out the best of its design, which included the energy efficient laminar flow wing that gave it the potential to escort Allied bombers all the way to Berlin with the addition of drop-tanks and a lean mixture when not in combat. It was flown in this guise as the Mustang III in British service, and as the P-51B/C in US service, then as the P-51D with the bubble canopy and cut-down aft fuselage, with an additional fin-fillet added later to improve stability that had been reduced by the new shape and fuel tank location. In British service it was known as the Mustang Mk.IV, and the same variant made at the Dallas factory with hollow AeroProducts props that was designated P-51K in US service was known as the Mk.IVa in RAF service to differentiate. Sadly, the hollow prop was prone to vibration thanks to some inferior quality control at the factory, so was often swapped out in the field. The P-51D is the Mustang that most people think of when they hear the name, unless they’re more of a petrol head or a bit horsey. The Kit We were treated to the ProfiPACK, & Royal Class of this new tooling and now it’s everyone’s favourite Mustang in 1:48 (with good reason), with an increasing number of variants with filleted and un-filleted tails differentiating them. We’re now able to get our hands on a Weekend Edition with 4 markings options. Inside the box are five sprues in blue/grey styrene, a clear sprue, a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE), two decal sheets and a thick instruction booklet with the markings options printed in the rear in colour. Construction begins with the seat, which is built up first, then the cockpit floor, tanks and radio gear are added in along with sidewall framework, the seat belts are provided as decals. It shapes up to be a well-detailed cockpit. The tail-wheel bay is made up, the radiator pathway and a spinner backing-plate are all slipped into the fuselage before they are closed up. The wheel bays are built up next with some advice regarding colour added along the way, splitting the bay down the middle and bracketing it front and back with bay walls that have partial ribs added once in place. This assembly is fitted to the full-width lower wing and joined by backing panels to the spent brass chutes, a central insert that shows through the bay, and a clear part for the identification lights. The wing uppers go on and the ailerons fit into tabs in their recesses, with some room for offsetting if you wish. On the leading edge is an insert for the guns, and you’ll need to fill a few panel lines under the nose. There are also a complement of holes that will need opening up if you’re fitting drop-tanks, so have a pin vice to hand. The wings are mated to the fuselage, and tiny clear wingtip lights are slotted in on long stalks, then the tail fins are begun. The filleted fin is a separate insert and the elevator fins with their metal flying surfaces are inserted into slots horizontally, while the rudder can be fitted at any sensible angle. The small PE fret provided with this kit is used as a template for panel lines for one of the decal options. You may have noticed the lack of comments about the instrument panel during building of the cockpit, but we’re getting to it now. The finished coaming and rudder pedals drop into the fuselage, but are first fitted with the panel, instruments are provided as decals. The two radiator doors under the tail are fitted at the same time as the tail wheel, with bay doors and PE closure mechanism added along the way, with a scrap diagram showing the correct orientation. Inside the main bay a pop-up landing light is slotted into its mounting point, and chin-scoop plus the correct panel under the nose (decal choices again), then it’s on to the main gear legs. The tyres are diamond tread, with wheels and hub caps added before they’re fitted to the struts, which have separate styrene scissor-links and door supports slotted into place. The flaps are each made up from two styrene parts, and a decal on the curved leading edge after painting. Those are all slotted in place on the underside along with the rest of the bay doors, and at that point you can sit her on her wheels and add the appropriate exhaust stacks. The prop is made from two paired blades that fit perpendicular to each other in a choice of two types of blades and spinner, canopy with interior structure, a backup ring and bead sight. There’s also an aerial on the spine behind the canopy. The weapons and drop tanks are last to be made, with a choice of two tank types that all share the same type of pylon, while a few spares are left on the sprue, including a set of six rockets under the wings, which have separate tails and moulded-in launch-rails and would be fitted three per side. Markings Eduard provide 4 options, which is pretty good for a weekend boxing. The two sheets are separated between the individual markings and standard stencils. From the box you can build one of the following: 44-72505, Maj. William A. Shomo, 82nd TRS, 71st TRG, 5th AF, Lingayen, Luzon, The Philippines, May-June 1945 44-72199, Capt. Charles E. Weaver, 362nd FS, 357th FG, 8th AF, RAF Leiston, Great Britain, April 1945 44-72099, Lt. Warren S. Blodgett, 84th FS, 78th FG, 8th AF, RAF Duxford, Cambridgeshire, Great Britain, April 1945 44-72558, 2nd Lt. Bennett C. Commer/2nd Lt. Henry C. Seegers jr., 458th FS, 506th FG, 20th AF, Iwojima, July 1945 Decals are printed in-house with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The stencils are dealt with on the back page in the instructions to prevent clutter and replication of effort, and the various metallic and fabric covered sections for the "unpainted" decal options are marked on another page. Conclusion We already know the quality of the basic kit, and this box thats what you get, it is still a great kit without all the Eduard bells and whistles and that suits some modellers (like the reviewer). Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Tora Tora Tora! (11155) A6M2 Zero Type 21 Dual Combo 1:48 Eduard The Zero was the direct successor to the diminutive A5M from the same company, Mitsubishi, and came into service with the Japanese Navy in 1940, where it was extremely well received. It was a fast, highly manoeuvrable aircraft with powerful armament for the time, and it had good fuel economy due to the light-weight construction that would contribute to its downfall later in the war. The engineers used an extremely light duralumin variant, and lightened everything they could to shave weight from the airframe, including perforating the pilot’s seat, with no armour or self-sealing fuel tanks to protect the pilot or aircraft from incoming fire. While the Zero was the fastest kid on the block this wasn’t such an issue, but as the Allies improved their aircraft, they began to fall into their sights more frequently with the inevitable outcome that a great many experienced Japanese aviators were shot down and killed, leaving inexperienced novices to fall prey to the by-then experienced Allied flyers. One such battle was referred to the Marianas Turkey Shoot due to the horrible losses suffered by the Japanese. Toward the end of the war there were improvements made to the type, but many were converted to fly as Kamikaze aircraft, to hurl themselves in an act of futility against the advancing US forces in an attempt to sink their carriers and battleships. Its most infamous use was as the fighters and fleet patrol aircraft during the Pearl Harbour raid that drew America into WWII on 7th December 1941, with a fleet of Type 21s that are otherwise known as the A6M2b taking off first from their carriers due to their relatively short take-off requirements. The rest as they say, is history. The Kit This is a brand-new tooling from Eduard, and it has been given the same duty of care that they lavished on the Bf.109G, the Spitfire and Mustang, making a highly-detailed, totally modern model kit that will doubtless blow many of the ageing competition out of the water in this scale. This is the initial release that uses the attack codename Tora Tora Tora! as the strapline, which incidentally means Tiger Tiger Tiger. I learned something today, but I probably learned it before, as I’m starting to remember. It arrives in a well-stocked top-opening box with a pair of Zeroes on the cover, and some profiles of the decal options on the side. Inside are double sprues in resealable bags, with a total of eight sprues (four per kit), two clear sprues, two pre-painted Photo-Etch (PE) sheets, a sheet of kabuki tape masks for the external glazing (not pictured), three decal sheets and a rather thick instruction booklet with twelve pages of profiles for the marking options. If you’ve been watching the pre-launch of this kit you’ll know that it has exceptional detail on the sprues, and if it goes together like their recent P-51 kit, it will be a joy to build. The full exterior skin is riveted and has engraved panel lines, including some lapped panels where appropriate, all done with incredible fidelity and finesse. The decals are also similarly well done, and the instructions are up to Eduard’s usual level of quality, showing where the various PE enhancements should go, as well as calling out detail painting in their preferred Gunze Sangyo codes. Construction begins with the fuselage, which is painted and detailed internally with PE and styrene parts within the cockpit area to bolster the already excellent ribbing detail that is moulded-in. Some of the styrene parts are upgraded with PE fronts to further improve the look. The cockpit interior is then started with the styrene rudder pedals clipped off the part and replaced by new PE pedals. The pilot’s ventilated seat is laced with four pre-painted belts and attached to the fuselage frame by a pair of brackets and is joined by an adjuster with a curved PE bracket, the styrene version of which is first removed from the original part. The cockpit floor is well-detailed with rivets and is a shallow V-shape, with a small insert filling a gap in the underside, an instrument box detailed with PE toggle-switches, then the pilot’s control column and linkages are all installed on the topside along with the rudders. The sides of the cockpit contain various equipment boxes, which are all stripped of styrene detail to be replaced by PE parts, and they are then brought together with the rear frame, seat, floor and sides to create the cockpit assembly, which is then further detailed with more PE and optional decals, has the layered PE instrument panel built up and inserted into the front of the assembly, which then has the two nose-mounted machineguns added to a shaped part that slots into holes at the front of the cockpit. Behind the pilot a trio of tanks that are glued vertically to the back of the frame, then the completed assembly is put to the side briefly while the fuselage is glued together, adding the rudder, an insert under the tail, and a section of the cowling in front of the nose as you go. Once the glue has dried, the cockpit can be inserted into the fuselage from below, using the gap in the fuselage where the wings will later sit. Like many WWII fighters, the lower wing half is a single part, which is stiffened by a short spar that stretches between the ends of the wheel bays and also forms the back walls. Two holes in the centres of the wings are filled with inserts to obtain the correct blister layout, and the rest of the wheel bay walls are added before the two upper wing panels are laid over the top with bay roof inserts and glued in place. On the inside of the wings there are engraved lines where the folding tips can be cut loose, but for this boxing they are ignored. A pair of clear wingtip lights and styrene ailerons are added, and a scrap diagram shows how the trailing wing root should look once glued, to ensure you don’t make a rod for your back down the line. The “tail” of the wing assembly is ribbed inside, and is fitted out with some small parts, although it’s a mystery to me at this stage where it can be seen from without the aid of an endoscope. The elevator fins are separate from their flying surfaces, and while the fins are two parts each, the thin trailing surfaces are single parts with lots of rib detail moulded-in. These and the wings are added to the fuselage along with some tiny fairings for the aileron actuators, a head cushion for the pilot (isn’t he lucky?), and an intake grille under the nose. The model is looking like a Zero now, but has no nose (I won’t do the joke), which is next to be made up. Both banks of pistons of the Nakajima Sakae radial engine are present, plus a fan of rods front and back, with a two-part reduction gear bell-housing at the front, which has a tiny decal added to it once painted. This fits on a stepped ring that glues to the tapered front of the fuselage, then a bit of fancy styrene engineering takes place. The cowling is built up around a cylindrical jig that you should remain unglued unless you enjoy swearing. The intake lip is fitted to the narrow end of the jig, then two almost semi-cylindrical cowling halves are added, locating in slots in the aft lip of the jig, and gluing to the lip at the front. The intake trunk is inserted into the gap in the underside, and this too has its own groove in the lip, and when the glue is dry, the assembly can be slipped off the jig, and the final section that contains the gun troughs can be added along with another pair of small inserts at the bottom-rear where the exhaust stacks are glued. The finished cowling can then be slid over the engine and secured in place with more glue. The Zero’s wide-track gear made for easy deck-handling, and each of the main legs is made from a single strut with a captive bay door and a three-part wheel/hub combo with no sag engineered in. If you want weighted tyres, you can either sand off the bottom of the kit tyres, or get the Brassin resin wheels that we’ll be reviewing shortly, which have additional detail to sweeten the deal, and include a new tail-wheel strut into the bargain. The struts have their styrene scissor-links removed and replaced by PE parts, then the legs are inserted into the wells, and joined by the inner doors along the centreline, the tail-wheel with two-part strut and tiny wheel, plus a choice of deployed or stowed arrestor hook. There are also a pair of tiny decals for the inside of the main gear bays, which adds a little extra visual interest. Finally, there is a tiny additional bay door at the base of each gear leg, with a scrap diagram showing the correct angle to fit it. With the model still on its back, the fuel tank is built-up from three parts and is glued to the underside, with horn balances added to the ailerons, and a crew-step under the port edge of the wing-root fairing. Another scrap diagram shows the correct orientation of the horn balances. The three-bladed prop is moulded as a single part, with a front and rear spinner half, which slides onto the axle at the front of the engine. On the topside, the gun-sight installs on the coaming, with a PE Direction-Finding (D/F) loop behind the pilot’s head, installed before you address the canopy. The windscreen is fitted first, and you have a choice of closed canopy that is made of two parts and an aerial, or in the open option that has the fixed rear, a slightly larger sliding canopy that fits over the rear, and the same aerial. Inside the sliding portion are a pair of small PE detail parts, and if you spring for additional Tface masks, it may be best to apply the masks before the PE parts. A clear light is added to the very rear of the fuselage, four little upstands are fitted into sockets in the mid-wing, the gun muzzles are inserted into the leading edge with a pitot probe on the port side, plus two tiny PE gear-down indicators over their respective bays. Markings 12 markings options is excellent, even though you’ve got two models to cover, all of which took part in the raid as either fighter or patrol aircraft, and all wearing the same basic scheme. From the box you can build two of the following: Lt.Cdr. Shigeru Itaya, Akagi Fighter Squadron, first attack wave c/n probably 2236, PO2c Akira Yamamoto, Kaga Fighter Squadron, first attack wave Lt. Masaji Suganami, Sōryū Fighter Squadron, first attack wave PO1c Kazuo Muranaka, Hiryú Fighter Squadron, first attack wave Lt. Tadashi Kaneko, Shōkaku Fighter Squadron, first attack wave Lt. Masao Satō, Zuikaku Fighter Squadron, first attack wave PO1c Tetsuzō Iwamoto, Zuikako Fighter Squadron, patrol during the first attack wave Lt. Saburō Shindō, Akagi Fighter Squadron, second attack wave PO1c Yoshikazu Nagahama, Kaga Fighter Squadron, second attack wave c/n 3277, Lt. Fusata Iida, Sōryū Fighter Squadron, second attack wave c/n 2266, PO1c Shigenori Nishikaichi, Hiryū Fighter Squadron, second attack wave PO1c Yukuo Hanzawa, Shōkaku Fighter Squadron, patrol during the second attack wave Decals are by Eduard, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. There is a separate page dedicated to the stencil locations that are shown on a set of grey profiles to avoid cluttering the colour profiles. Upgrade Sets Conclusion This is a great piece of news for anyone interested in WWII Japanese naval aviation, and brings Eduard’s renowned level of skill and detail to the subject, kicking it up to the maximum. Watch out for some additional aftermarket sets from Eduard for those that aren’t satisfied with excellent detail and want incredible detail. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Hallo After 2 decades of modelling, my first 109 again. This should be a Christmas present to my brother. He lives 500 meters away from the airfield Seyring. He is interestred in history in his neighborhood. So I thought, maybe he likes it? Well, what do you think? The Revi is Resin, the pitot tub also. Everything else straight from the box. Used Mr. Gunze C colors. Happy modelling
  14. Hi there! While trying to tidy up my workshop lately, I came upon a plastic box with a surprise inside! An old Eduard Yak-3, 75% complete, that I was able to date with Carbon 14 as my first attempt to build something just back from Taiwan in 2014. As seven years later I was still strugling to build something, I decided that it was worth giving it a second try. Today the kit is 99% finished, but I'l take you through the build if you don't mind, before embarking on a small vignette set-up. Here we go. Here's what I found in the box. Everything seems to be there. I'll have to have another go at the prop, as it breaks apart as soon as I touched it. Overall, the rest of the kit looks good, I'll have to touch up the karman, at that's about all. The main problem with this kit is the thickness of the wings trailing edges, but it's to late to do something about that, I'll have to live with it. At least, Ed's PE gives a nice looking cockpit.
  15. Hello Britmodeller world! have just managed to obtain the Eduard 1/72 scale Desert Babes Tornado GR1 which we all know contains the Revell plastic from 2000. Be warned there is a fair bit of flash on some of the Gulf specific weapon parts and the laser fairing glass is gonna need some attention with a decent blade to sort it out! There is also a spurious clear spruce which appears to have a spare fairing glass on it which is no better than the one on the main clear sprue! On the plus side the resin seats and wheels are lovely! Can’t grumble I suppose for £22!
  16. To see and hear the engine click the link below photos. Video of "engine startup" and "test run". Enjoy!
  17. The story so far: In order to keep it as at least a neutral country, the Third Reich offered Argentina a batch of 10 brand new Bf 109F-4s. These aircraft were numbered from I-101 to I-110. In order to improve the aircraft's performance, the Argentinian Air Force asked Messerschmitt to leave the 109s in bare metal, the only areas receiving some sort of "camouflage" being the fabric covered control surfaces. The Argentinian flag was painted in the rudder. The 10 aircraft were then given to the newly created Grupo 5 de Caza (5th Fighter Group) based at the Moròn Air Base in Buenos Aires. After the war, the ten 109s were scrapped. No remains were left. Footnote: This is a what if story, don't do as the Argentinian modellers did by believing it. Grupo 5 de Caza was also based at Villa Reynolds (San Luís, Argentina), and was established in 1966. They used the A-4 Skyhawks. I was inspired to make this what if after seeing a profile of an Fw 190A-4 in bare metal and with Argentinian colours. The kit chosen for this was the Weekend Edition of the Eduard 1:48 Bf 109F-4. Some fit issues, the instrument panel had to be trimmed so the fuselage halves could close properly. And the forward parts of the wheelwells needed to be sanded down so the upper wings could mate with the lower wings. Decals came from my spares box.
  18. I held a poll this 24 asking whether Argentina would have used the Bf 109F-4 or the Fw 190A-2/3 had it joined the Axis officially during WW2. The 109 won, so I placed the order yesterday for the Eduard Weekend Edition Bf 109F-4 in 48th scale, and today made the payment for the kit. Knowing Dukel Hobbies, the model should arrive this week (hopefully). I've already decided to paint the aircraft in a natural metal finish scheme, with the antiglare panel being the remainder of the RLM 74/75 camouflage. The rudder will carry the Argentinian flag. Numerals will be I-110 (I for Interceptor), with the emblem of G5C in the nose, and maybe the addition of "Fuerza Aérea Argentina" below the G5C's emblem. The decals are from Condor Decals sheet for the Mirage IIIEA/CJ in 48th. The poll: Image of the kit contents: Inspiration for my 109: Emblem of the G5C: Stay tuned for more progress!
  19. F-4B Phantom Update Sets (648682 & 644127) 1:48 Eduard Brassin & Löök (For Tamiya kit) The new Tamiya F-4B kit was a welcome addition to their line of new tool aircraft. Eduard now bring us some update sets for this kit. All are cast to their usual high standards. As usual with Eduard's small Brassin and Löök sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package with their range specific branding, a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. My only gripe is the amount glue Eduard use the mount the look panels & PE to the backing. F-4B Wheels (648682) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. Inside are four resin wheels on their own casting blocks, with moulded-in hubs plus a set of pre-cut kabuki tape masks (not pictured). The wheels are all attached to their blocks on their contact patches, with additional wisps of resin supporting the wheel further and helping to reduce the likelihood of air bubbles within the moulds. These are easily removed with a razor saw and a swipe with a sanding stick that should leave all the crisp diamond tread intact. They’re a much better detailed drop-in replacement for the kit parts from thereon in, and have no annoying mould seams to deal with. F-4B Löök Cockpit Set (644127) This combination set of pre-painted resin and Photo-Etch (PE) arrives glued to the backing card, and care must be taken when removing them to avoid bending the PE. It’s best to separate them using a sharp blade pushed between the parts and the card, then clean up the glue residue from the rear where necessary. The resin parts cast in black & Dark Grey, with the instrument dials, black bezels and their glossy overcoat printed directly on the resin, giving a highly realistic finish. It is easily removed from its block by cutting through the delicate fingers that attach the panel, and minimal clean-up should be needed here. We get panels for both cockpits as well as side panels. Full belts and firing handles are provided to use on the kit seat. Review sample courtesy of
  20. Hi guys, I just finished this longer than usual project. Is the fantastic Fw190 A-4 Eduard 1/48th kit with some aftermarket details. Eduard's Advanced Brassin set which includes: resin engine & fuselage guns, resin wingroot gunbays, resin propeller and PE upgrade set. Master Models gun barrels, HGW Models fabric German fighter seatbelts and decals, Quinta Studio 3D decals cockpit set, and Aires resin inspection panel on the vertical stabilizer. For the colour scheme I wanted to do something different to the usual ones that we see in the Fw190 so I've opted for this very attractive North African camouflage. It was flown by Erich Rudorffer in Tunisia in 1943 Considered by many to be the Luftwaffe’s greatest all-round fighter ace of World War Two, Erich Rudorffer served on every major front, flew all of the classic German fighters and was renowned for his ability to shoot down multiple aircraft in succession. Beginning his campaign with JG2 during the Battle of France, Rudorffer then served in the Battle of Britain alongside top aces such as Helmut Wick and Gunther Seeger. Flying the Bf109E, his aerial victories soon mounted, and he continued to joust with the RAF during the ’Non-stop’ offences of 1941. By the time of the ill-fated Dieppe Raid in 1942, Rudorffer scored his 44th and 45th victories, both Spitfires. His Gruppe was then relocated to northern Africa where the war was going badly for the Axis forces. Now flying the heavily-armed Fw190, he began to demonstrate his skill at downing a number of aircraft on a single sortie. On the 9th February 1943 he claimed eight British aircraft and a short time later scored multiple victories over US-flown fighters. By June of the same year, Erich had moved to the brutal Eastern Front, assuming command of II/JG54, the famous ‘Green Hearts’, and continued to display his remarkable ability. On the 6th November 1943, he tangled with a large force of Soviet aircraft and shot down no fewer than thirteen of them, a record for a single mission. By this time Rudorffer had already been awarded the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves and in January 1945 ‘Swords’ were awarded to this decoration after achieving his 212th victory. Shortly after, he was given the command of I/JG7, flying the potent Me262 jet fighter in the defence of Germany. Despite the dreadful war situation, lack of fuel, marauding Allied fighters over the jet airfields and heavily outnumbered in the air, he managed to shoot down a further twelve aircraft with the Me262. By the war’s end, Erich Rudorffer had flown more than 1000 sorties, scored 224 victories and was the seventh-highest Ace in the history of aerial combat. He died at the age of 98, on the 8 of April 2016. Fw 190A4 6.JG2 Yellow 1 Erich Rudorffer, Tunisia 1943 cheers and thanks for looking. Jorge
  21. Hello again fellow modellers. This week I present another of the small stash I had of Eduard Fw190's. Built from the box and using the suggested colour scheme for the camouflage. It's a different scheme from the usual, which is what attracted me to the build. It is also my best constructed Eduard 190 yet, though I must admit I still struggle to find the best way to put together the undercarriage wheel wells so it fits snugly with the wings. Anyone out there who knows how to do it properly please let me know as I still have one Fw190 to build. Anyway, to this model. Brush painted (as always) using Xtracolour paints and the odd bit of Humbrol here and there. The strange demarcations were achieved by cutting chevrons into some Tamiya masking tape with a scalpel. I thought it worked quite well. Final coat of the Winsor & Newton flat acrylic and this was the result. Not bad for a beginner, but as I have been modelling off and on for 55 years I should be better that this. Here she is.
  22. Good evening to all! this is my last work from the Eduard's Bf.109 G-6 kit (converted to G-14 standard - all the parts you need are already in the box). This particular Gustav was the personal aircraft of Maj. Mario Bellagambi of the Aeronautica Nazionale Repubblicana, during march 1945. Aftermarkets used: Brassin cockpit and wheels. Eduard PE set. Quickboost propeller and corrected spinner. STORMO! decals. Master guns & pitot. Fuselage/upper wings balkenkreuz and yellow 1 masked and painted with self made mask, camo painted with Gunze Sangyo paints. Hope you'll enjoy. Cheers from Rome! Valerio. BF.109 END_28 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_24 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_20 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_18 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_17 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_19 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_16 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_15 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_14 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_13 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_12 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_11 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_8 by Valerio, su Flickr BF.109 END_26 by Valerio, su Flickr
  23. Arado Ar.234B Update Sets (648687 & 644126) 1:48 Eduard Brassin & Löök Following Hobby 2000’s recent re-release of the Hasegawa plastic of this innovative WWII German jet bomber/reconnaissance aircraft in their boxes, Eduard have released some new sets to help us adding detail to the base model. We had a look at the first tranche here of sets recently, and now there are a few more for us to drool over. As usual with Eduard's small Brassin and Löök sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package with their range specific branding, a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Ar.234B Wheels (648687) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. Inside are three resin wheels on their own casting blocks, with moulded-in hubs plus a set of pre-cut kabuki tape masks (not pictured). The wheels are all attached to their blocks on their contact patches, with additional wisps of resin supporting the wheel further and helping to reduce the likelihood of air bubbles within the moulds. These are easily removed with a razor saw and a swipe with a sanding stick that should leave all the crisp diamond tread intact. They’re a much better detailed drop-in replacement for the kit parts from thereon in, and have no annoying mould seams to deal with. Ar.234B Löök Cockpit Set (644126) This combination set of pre-painted resin and Photo-Etch (PE) arrives glued to the backing card, and care must be taken when removing them to avoid bending the PE. It’s best to separate them using a sharp blade pushed between the parts and the card, then clean up the glue residue from the rear where necessary. The resin part is cast in very dark grey, with the instrument dials, black bezels and their glossy overcoat printed directly on the resin, giving a highly realistic finish. It is easily removed from its block by cutting through the delicate fingers that attach the panel, and minimal clean-up should be needed here. The PE includes a full set of four-point harnesses for the pilot’s seat, together with the comfort pads that glue in place under the buckles. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Hello everyone...... This has been on and off my bench going back to 2012 when I picked it up off Ebay when I lived in the States. I finally summoned up will to try and get it built, as I'm stuck at the Zimmerit stage on my Elephant I just recently kicked off...... This Panther G has been a trial......It has a few upgrade sets involved. Tamiya Panther tracks Griffon Model Schurtzen Eduard Night Fighting detail set. FineMolds Vision blocks RB Barrel Masterclub resin bolts There's still a few details to add like the lower MG port cover on a chain, vision blocks (after main painting) and welds lines etc etc. It'll probably be on its way to completion by years end ....I hope. The paint scheme will I think be a vehivcle that has come back for a re-fit to get the night vision equipment and a new turret. So this will be in primer red where as the main hull will be in it's previous camouflage scheme prior to being sent back. The schurtzen will also be a mixed bag of new and a couple of old bent one's with original camouflage on them and battle damage.....well here's where we stand at present. Right side view. The gun rod cleaning tube is scratch built with 5mm brass tube, using the end caps from the kit parts with off-cut brass fret for handles and main brackets to the hull. Al the wiring is in super fine soldering wire. The connection point into the top of the turret for the electrics as well scratch built from bits and pieces. I decided to add additional camouflage loops to the main turret for branches etc they added in the field. I decided also not to go with the PE pins to hold on the spare track links and made them from Friul Track wire I had knocking around. The Masterclub bolt heads were a bind to add to the Schurtzen brackets rails, but I think when painted they should show up nice. Weld lines added for Night Fighting brackets. Well......try and finish all the remaining details and hopefully set up the airbrush next week for a primer coat to check for flaws etc to fix. Catch you all soon. Regards Simon.
  25. Thanks "hawkeye" Tbolt (link) ! Is Eduard to release soon a new tool (?) 1/72nd North American P-51D kit? Let's have a look at page 52 of this month Eduard Info Vol.20 May 2021. Source: https://www.eduard.com/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2021/info-eduard-2021-05-enrr.pdf V.P.
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