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  1. Soviet/Russian Ejection Seat Handles (49911) 1:48 Eduard Those red handles that enable pilots to take the quick vertical exit from their aircraft in the event of catastrophe must be one of the most welcome sights at the time. A swift pull of the handles and a few seconds later you're dangling at the end of your parachute, hopefully safe from harm other than a sprained ankle (other landing injuries are available). This one includes lots of types of handles, and as usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. The set is nickel-plated and pre-painted, predominantly with red, but with a smattering of black and white here and there. There are four basic types of seat catered for, with subvariants having slightly different handle designs, with a total of 26 sets (you can see the suggested aircraft in the pic above). Each one folds along the line of symmetry so that the colour is on both sides, and some of the two-handled variants are bent to a slight angle vertically, presumably to allow an easier grip by the pilot. As well as each type having the suggested aircraft etched under/over it, the instructions also show the location on the seat that the part should be glued, which can be done after painting, as the plating represents the bare metal sections of the parts. A quick and useful upgrade to the detail of any ejection seat, regardless of whether the canopy is to be open or closed. highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Eduard MiG-21MF Interceptor Profipack (70141) 1:72 Eduard The Mig 21 has the distinction of having been produced in greater numbers than any other supersonic jet fighter aircraft in the world. It has seen service with dozens of counties globally and has seen action in Vietnam, the Middle East, Yugoslavia, Cuba and during numerous conflicts in Africa. The design was even copied by the Chinese, where it is known as the Chengdu J-7. The MF is the export version of the SM (itself an upgraded version of the MiG-21S) with modernised radar and avionics and an upgraded R13-300 turbojet engine. This particular variant has seen service with many Soviet states and their post-Cold War descendants. Czechoslovakia had a substantial quantity that were split between the Czech Republic and Slovakia following the Velvet Divorce, eventually to be replaced by Saab Gripens and Mig-29s respectively. This is the first mainstream boxing of Eduard's long anticipated all-new 1:72 MiG-21 kit. I have been waiting years since this kit was first announced and I'm happy to say that it doesn't disappoint... but more of that later. As the kit is part of Eduard's Profipack line, it is supplied with photo etched details, masks and a generous selection of marking options. The kit is spread across three sprues of grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The parts are classic modern Eduard; beautifully moulded, with fine, crisp panel lines and fastener detail where appropriate. If you're seriously into your MiGs, then you may care to note that this kit apparently represents the Gorky produced MiG-21MF, manufactured after the Moscow factory re-tooled for the MiG-23. In common with many kits of single-seat jet fighters, the cockpit is combined with the nose gear bay. The cockpit itself comprises a floor which is combined with the roof of the nose gear bay, separately moulded sidewalls, rudder pedals and a control column, in instrument panel which can make use of decals or the included photo etched details, and front and rear bulkheads. Photo etched parts are provided for the sidewalls as well as the instrument panel, and again decals are provided as an alternative to the photo etched parts. The KM-1 ejection seat is broken down into three parts and is very nicely detailed. As this is a profipack edition, there are pre-painted photo etched details provided for the seat harnesses. Other parts that have to be assembled before the fuselage halves can be combined include the main landing gear bays and the jet exhaust pipe. The former is comprised four parts including the front and rear bulkheads. There is plenty of moulded detail here and it should take a wash quite nicely. The engine exhaust pipe includes a representation of the rear of the engine moulded into a bulkhead, as well as a single piece forward exhaust tube, the afterburner ring, and a two-part aft exhaust tube. As you will have seen from the photographs above, this kit is unlike most other MiG-21s as the lower wing is moulded as a single span, joined by the central section of the lower fuselage. To this part, the upper wings must be added before being joined to the now-complete fuselage. The dorsal spine of the MF - which includes the vertical tail - must also be added at this stage, along with the outer part of the jet exhaust and the air intake outer ring. Several cockpit components, such as the instrument panel coaming and HUD unit must also be fitted at this stage. Being as this is a profipack edition, the plastic 'odd rods' IFF array on the fin and below the nose can be replaced with photo etched parts. The slab elevators are, of course, moulded as solid parts, but the ailerons and blown flaps on the main wing are seperate parts. Optional parts are included for open or closed airbrake configurations, and of course there are a plethora of scoops and intakes to add detail to the fuselage. The landing gear on these kits is well detailed. The single nose wheel is clamped in place by a two-part gear leg and the wheel itself features a seperate hub. Two gear bay doors sit at either side of the narrow bay, linked to the fuselage by a pair of hinge tabs with some detail moulded into the inside. The strakes immediately aft of the nose gear bay are provided on both the plastic frame and the fret of photo etched parts. The main gear is a single strut for each leg with a separate hydraulic extender. The wheels have separate hubs and you get a lovely set of pre-cut tape masks to help you paint them. The main gear doors are nicely detailed and included separately moulded parts for the hydraulic mechanisms. The canopy is moulded in two parts and finishing details are provided on the fret of PE parts (including vanes for the pitot probe). The pre-cut tape masks cover not just the canopy but the dielectric panels too. The kit includes a comprehensive set of external stores, including: 1 x 800L external fuel tank 2 x 490L external fuel tank 2 x RS-2US missiles 2 x R-3S missiles 2 x R-13 missiles 2 x RATO units. A generous five options are included on the decal sheet: Polish Air Force: production number 96007600, No. 7600, 11 Pułk Lotnictwa Myśliwskiego, Mierzęcice, Poland, early 1990s. This airfraft is finished in overall silver; Czech Air Force: prodction number 96004017, No. 4017, 9.slp/ 9. sbolp, Bechyně, Czechoslovakia, early 1990s. This aircraft is also finished in overall silver; German Democratic Republic (East German) Air Force: production number 96002170, No. 784, Jagdfliegergeschwader 3, Preschen, late 1980s. This aircraft is finished in a two-tone green disruptive camouflage over light blue; Romanian Air Force: production number 96006721, No. 6721, Regimentul 71 Aviaţie Vânătoare, Câmpia Turzii Airbase, 1990. This aircraft is also finished in overall silver; and Malian Air Force: production number 96005512, No. TZ-356, Senou Airbase, The Republic of Mali, 2006. This aircraft is finished in an interesting scheme comprising two shades of brown and two of green over a light blue underside. The decals are well printed and a full set of stencils are included. I expect it will take a week to apply all of them! Conclusion It has been a long time coming, but Eduard have at last given us the definitive MiG-21MF in this scale. The kit is a thoroughly modern tooling of an important and iconic aircraft and appears to be accurate in both outline and detail. The engineering does not seem to be as complex as some recent Eduard kits, but it is still rich in detail. The decal options are comprehensive (the inclusion of an African scheme is particularly welcome) and the usual plethora of aftermarket parts are already available. My only gripe is that on all of the review kits I have received, there have been multiple parts detached from the frames before they have even been removed from the bag. I guess this is the price one pays for small attachment points, but make sure you check your bags carefully for stray parts when you received your kits. Other than that, this superlative kit can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Resin Detail Sets for Eduard MiG-21 MF Interceptor/Fighter-Bomber 1:72 Eduard Eduard's all-new MiG-21MF was one of the most hotly anticipated kits in 1:72 scale for some time. Now it is finally here, we can see that the kit doesn't disappoint. It is both accurate and well detailed and has made a lot of modellers of Warsaw Pact subjects very happy. That's not to say it can't be improved, however, thanks to the possibilities offered by resin replacements for some key components and sub-assemblies. MiG-21MF Interceptor Cockpit (672180) This set provides a complete replacement cockpit for the interceptor variant of the kit. The set comprises a complete cockpit tub (which replaces a multi-part version supplied with the kit), an instrument panel, coaming, control column, HUD unit and ejector seat. A small fret of photo etched parts is provided and this contains smaller details including harnesses for the seat, details for the instrument panel (which is otherwise devoid of cast detail). A small sheet of plastic film is provided for the HUD screen itself. While the plastic cockpit provided with the kit is no slouch when it comes to detail, there is only so much that can be achieved with injection moulded polystyrene. This resin version is a considerable upgrade over the plastic version and is well worth consideration. MiG-21MF Fighter-Bomber Cockpit (672179) This set provides a replacement resin cockpit for the fighter bomber version of the kit. It is identical to the set reviewed above for the interceptor, but includes a different tub and coaming complete with equipment used for bomb aiming and delivery. MiG-21MF Exhaust Nozzle (672181) This set manages to achieve the feat of improving on the parts provided with the kit while simplifying construction. The replacement resin jet pipe comprises just three resin parts and a small fret of photo etched components which represent a more detailed version of the afterburner flame holder. The replacement assembly simply slots into the kit fuselage with no cutting or surgery required. MiG-21MF Wheels (672182) This set is intended as a like-for-like swap for the kit wheels. A choice of two different main wheels are provided, although the instructions note that one type was rarely used on the MF, along with two identical nose wheels. This means you actually get enough wheels for two complete kits. As is the norm for a set of this type from Eduard, pre-cut masks are also provided to aid painting. These wheels, with their realistic tyre treads, offer a significant upgrade over the kit parts. MiG-21MF Airbrakes (672193) This set provides both fore and aft airbrakes. The former will require the equivalent kit parts to be cut away, while the latter parts are a straight swap for the kit versions. This is an all-resin set, with no photo etch parts required. MiG-21MF Big Sin Set (SIN 67215) This set brings together a number of resin sets in one money saving package. inside the box, you get the following resin replacements: cockpit exhaust nozzle undercarriage wheels fuselage / wing pylons The overall package is around 25% cheaper than buying al of the sets on their own. MiG-21MF Masks (CX511) In a departure from the normal pre-cut masks offered by Eduard, this set omits masks for the wheels (as they have separately moulded hubs) and instead provides masks for the various dielectric panels dotted around the jet. The canopy is, of course, also covered. Conclusion Eduard can hardly be accused of shyness when it comes to providing aftermarket for one of their marquee releases of the past 12 months. It's great that Eduard's approach caters for both the casual hobbyist (through the weekend range of kits) and the committed enthusiast through this extensive range of detail upgrades. The quality of the items on offer is excellent, with each offering considerable enhancement over the plastic equivalents. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Boulton Paul Defiant NF.I updates (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Airfix have rereleased their popular 1:48 Defiant as its Night Fighter equivalent, and this is the kit that these parts are intended for. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49908) This first set is a general airframe improvement package, consisting of two frets, one of which is nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass for the constructional elements. It provides substantial upgrades to the cockpit, including sidewall detail, laminated pre-printed instrument panels, plus controls and weapons detailing for the turret. The canopy is detailed with a windscreen hoop with integral rear-view mirrors, while underneath the airframe the radiator is skinned with mesh, the main gear bays receive skins to the sidewalls, and the landing gear legs themselves are treated to additional detail, plus new oleo-scissor links. Bay doors are skinned with more detailed surfaces, and additional detail is added within the bays. Finally, a rudder control linkage is installed in the tail after removing the nub from the rudder leading edge. Zoom! Set (FE908) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE909) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the set of crew belts for the pilot, you also get just a simple lap-belt for the poor old gunner. Landing Flaps (48958) This single fret of brass will allow you to build your model with dropped flaps for a bit more visual interest, regardless of whether they were seen that way in real life or not. You will need to remove some areas of the upper and lower wing, as the flaps aren't separate on the kit, although the ailerons are. With these parts removed as per the diagrams, it is relatively straight forward to fold up the bays and the flaps, with only a few lengths of 0.7mm wire or rod from your stocks needed to depict the hinge-point. Each rib is twisted and bent to lie in a pre-etched track, with one separate rib that couldn't be etched captive due to a change in the trailing edge profile. I really like these sets, and they really aren't as hard to do as you'd think. Masks (EX601) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy and turret, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Heinkel He.111H-6 Upgrade & Mask Sets 1:48 Eduard - For ICM Kit Promptly after completing a well-loved series of newly tooled Dornier Do.17/215 kits in this scale, ICM have now turned their attention to the Heinkel He.111. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Nose Interior (49904) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles that will be prominent within the greenhouse are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; seat details; canopy internal structure; additional instruments; gun sights and extra details, and even a bomb sight also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE904) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Radio Compartment (49905) Two frets are included, one small nickel plated and pre-painted, the other larger one in bare brass. It involves a heavy upgrade to the level of detail within the compartment, adding racks for ammo; stowage boxes; racking; partial bulkheads; a huge range of radio boxes and other equipment; gun sights and ammo embellishments; a framework with instruments around the top gun hatch, and a base for the nearby antenna. Exterior (48957) This set is provided as a large fret of brass, with an additional smaller one. This creates a new internal skin for the box-shaped bays, with additional structural details added throughout. It also extends and details the firewall behind the engine that is seen from within the bay, adds some small parts to the landing gear legs, as well as brake hoses. There are parts for the bombs and their braces. Seatbelts STEEL (FE905) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the pilot's four-point crew belts, you also get two sets of lap belts for the other crew, plus a set of webbing for the top gunner's position. Masks (EX598) Supplied on two sheets of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the rather pane-fully faceted canopy (see what I did there?) and other glazed parts, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the main and tail wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort, plus a landing light mask. Review samples courtesy of
  6. P-51D Gun Bays (Early & Late) (648397) 1:48 Eduard for Airfix Kit This set contains resin & PE to fit gun bays the new Airfix kit. The set contains parts for early and late gun bays. As well as the bays there are the guns and ammo belts. Decals are provided for the loading instructions inside the doors. Some surgery to the kits wings is needed, through note a lot, mainly just removing the panels. This set should get good results and would suit some kind of loading diorama. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Fw 190A-3 (48956) 1:48 Eduard This set contains some small cockpit items, wheel well details, new gear doors, leg brake lines, gun panel details, and cockpit canopy details. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Fw 190A-3 fighter (82144) 1:48 Eduard ProfiPACK edition. The Fw 190 came on-stream in 1941 and gave the RAF a shock with its superior performance to the older Bf.109 that it was mistaken for by many a hapless Spitfire pilot. The visionary designer Kurt Tank stripped down the aircraft as much as possible to give it the speed and manoeuvrability advantage the German Luftwaffe needed, which resulted in a small but pugnacious design with a twin-bank radial engine buried in a close-fitting nose cowling that could out-fly a Spitfire Mk.V in most respects below 20,000ft. The initial Fw 190A, they went from A-1 sub-variants, through A-2 with an improved engine and weapons, the A-3 with another power improvement and the ability to mount more external weapons, as the versatility of the airframe was realised. The A-4 was little different, with more armament options that could be fitted in the field, and after that came the A-5 all the way up to the A-10, and in ground attack versions we had the F, with the high altitude variant designed D, with the G replacing some of the later A variants that had either long-range tanks or specialist armaments fitted. The A-5 was developed when it was found the airframe was capable of carrying more weight than it was designed for. The engine was moved forward 6 inches, thus moving the centre of gravity forward allowing more weight to be carried further aft. The Kit The newly tooled early Fw.190A series has added much to Eduard's existing line of Fw 190 variants, and with tooling advancement used to improve the model, it is an excellent choice for anyone wanting a Butcher Bird for their collection. The ProfiPACK boxing includes extras to improve on the already excellent detail, and arrives in the traditional orange-themed box, which is adorned with a painting of the iconic Butcher bird engaged with a Spitfire. Inside are five grey/blue sprues, one clear, a fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, a small sheet of kabuki tape masking material, two decal sheets and the instruction/painting guide in glossy colour printing. Due to the pick-n-mix nature of the sprues there will be a fair quantity of spares left after construction, which are marked on the diagrams with a pale blue overprinting. Construction starts in the cockpit, which is augmented with pre-painted PE side consoles and instrument panels, but also retained are the decals that can be applied to flat panels, as well as the engraved panels for those that prefer to paint their details manually. The tub includes the sharply pointed rear deck, to which you add the rear bulkheads, control column, seat, plastic or PE rudder pedals, pre-painted seatbelts and sundry other parts in styrene and PE. In order to close up the fuselage the cockpit assembly is inserted along with a bulkhead that closes up the front of the tub, two exhaust inserts in the cowling, and the engine assembly, which is only an approximation of the front row of cylinders, plus the reduction gear, as not much will be seen once the cowling is in place. The lower wings are full width, and have a spar fitted that runs to the ends of the gear bays, with detail on the face visible through the apertures. This is augmented by the wheel trays, various ribs and the cannon barrels that protrude through, with the upper wings added after painting of the bay roof detail that is etched into their underside. The completed wing assembly is then offered up to the fuselage, and the missing sections of the cowling with exhaust stubs, gun barrels and troughs are added to the top and bottom of the nose. The two-piece ring finishes the front cowling, and the flying surfaces are glued into to place, including separate rudder and ailerons, and fixed elevators. Two types of tyres are provided for the main gear, which have separate hubs, and fit onto the peg on the ends of the strut, with separate oleo-scissors and captive bay door parts. The retraction gear is installed on the inner side of the leg, and the centre doors fit to the central bar that splits the bays. The tail wheel slots into the rear, crew step, gun barrels and pitot probes are installed, then the three-bladed paddle prop is completed with spinner and fan behind it, with a peg at the rear fitting into a corresponding hole in the engine front. Different open and closed canopies are provided, and are outfitted with head armour before being added to the airframe along with the windscreen part. The last touch is to add the gear-down indicator pegs to the tops of the wings, which are made from tiny PE parts. If you are rigging the aerial wire to the tail, remember that if you pose the canopy open, the wire can appear relaxed, although many photos also show it taut, so check your references. Markings This ProfiPACK edition gives you five decal options, with plenty of variation between them, and don’t forget that you also have masks for the canopy and the wheel hubs to ease your painting job, which is always nice. From the box you can build one of the following: A. W. Nr. 2278, flown by Uffz. Erich Pflaum, 2./ JG 51, Ljuban, Soviet Union, September 1942 B. W. Nr. 5227, flown by Fw. Karl Willius, 3./ JG 26, Saint-Omer, France, August 1942 C. W. Nr. 257, flown by Hptm. Joachim Müncheberg, CO of II./ JG 26, Abbeville-Drucat, France, May 1942 D. W. Nr. 432, flown by Oblt. Erich Rudorffer, CO of 6./ JG 2, Beaumont-le-Roger, France, August 1942 E. W. Nr. 418, flown by Oblt. Robert Olejnik, CO of 4./ JG 1, Woensdrecht, the Netherlands, June 1942 Conclusion With a good selection of decal options, highly detailed plastic and some PE, this is a lovely kit that will give you plenty of modelling fun. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. As I said in the GB thread, my original plan was to make a figure, I wanted to make a model of my Great Grandfather who succumbed to wounds at Gallipoli in 1915. He was serving in the Hampshire Regiment which were part of the Irish Division. Sadly I lack the skill for such a model which I would really want to do justice so it will have to wait for when I have more time! Being a sucker for punishment, I've dug a biplane out of the stash, I bought the 1/48th Eduard Hanriot HD-1 in Italian markings many years ago when I had a fit of enthusiasm for WW.I subjects, I was drawn by the very colourful markings which to my mind are synonymous with WW.I. It includes some resin, PE and masks. The Western Front rightly gets a lot of attention but this was the first world war and I thought I'd commemorate the fighting which went on in an oft forgotten front but in addition to the main protagonists, Italy and Austria-Hungary, it also dragged in combatants from other nations such as the GB, Germany and the USA. Enough of my waffle, here's the kit and the few references I have on the type (though to be fair, the Windsock datafile and the kit seem very comprehensive). I haven't decided on which of the kit markings I'll be doing yet, the one on the box top is quite attractive but there are also a couple of very nice silver-doped schemes I like too, choices, choices!
  10. Aero L-29 Delfín (8464) 1:48 Eduard Weekend Edition Designed in Czechoslovakia in the 1960s, the Delfín was a two-seat military jet trainer used by the Warsaw Pact countries that is still in operation with some countries and in private hands today. It is simple in construction and cheap to operate, with a good safety record due to its pleasant handling characteristics, which endears it to the cost conscious and anyone wishing to stay alive. Over 3,600 were made, and due to their use by the Soviet Air Force, they were dubbed "Maya" under the NATO reporting coding. As well as flight training, the Delfín is equipped with hard points to allow it to be used in weapons training, which has inevitably led to it being used in action on occasion most notably during the Yom Kippur war, but also in other "low level" conflicts over time. It has been gradually replaced by the L-39 Albatros, but still finds use with private operators for air racing, experimental flights as well as joy-rides. The Sasol Tigers in South Africa fly the L-29 as an acrobatic team, and the low cost of ownership has made it a popular entry into jet-powered flying. The Kit As well as making their own kits, Eduard are making a name for releasing other manufacturers kits with their own Eduard parts and decals. This is such a kit using the AMK plastic. In the box there are five sprues of medium grey styrene, a small sprue of clear parts, and a glossy instruction manual with painting instructions on the rear pages. The tooling is good quality, with perhaps only the engraved panel lines appearing a shade wider than I would have liked, although by the time they are primed and painted, it probably won't notice. Construction starts with the cockpit, and a pair of ejection seats are built up from a two-piece frame to which the seat cushion and back cushions are added. Belts are provided on the decal sheet. The rear-seat has the canopy breaker framework removed, so make sure you place it in the rear cockpit once you're ready. The cockpit is a single tub into which the central bulkhead and instrument panels fit, along with the front coaming and two control columns that reflect its trainer status. Decals are supplied for the instrument panels. A pair of ejection seat rails are added to the back of each cockpit area, the rear set being cut shorter and adding a pair of shrouds around the rear-seater's shoulders. The nose gear bay has to be built up next along with the single engine exhaust, as both of them are trapped inside the fuselage with the cockpit. The exhausts have a fine pen-nib tip to them, which is well moulded, with the exhaust trunking made from two halves and a rear-face to the engine itself at the end. The cockpit sidewalls are moulded into the fuselage halves, and are well done with a single extra part added to each side before the cockpit is installed. The nose-gear bay is also detailed with ribbing, plus various pressure bottle that add some extra interest and colour, as they are painted light blue. The fuselage closes around the three assemblies, with the cockpit rear having an insert behind the rear seat, and the engine supported by moulded in bulkheads with cut-outs that ensure it is correctly seated. Eduard's bunny pops up to remind you to add nose weight under the cockpit to prevent a tail-sitter, but if you plan on leaving the nose bay closed, you can add more there too. A clear blast-screen fits between the two cockpits, framed by a very delicate hoop that is built into the fuselage halves, so take care handling! The wings have the flap sections removed, and if you plan on modelling them retracted, all you need to do is remove the actuator rods from them and glue them in place. If you plan on having them deployed, leave the rods on.The intakes on the Delfín are in the wing roots and are simply curved into a central tunnel to feed the engine. The intake lips are moulded into the wing roots, and a curved part with splitter is then added into the gap behind them. The splitter plate is added to the sides of the fuselage, and a shield-shaped hole in the side of the fuselage allows the intake trunking to disappear into the darkness never to be seen again. Pitot probes are moulded into the wing halves, and I'm probably going to knock those off with my clumsiness too. A clear landing light is added to the underside of the port wing and formation lights are added to both wing tips, after which the wings are glued to the fuselage, with surprisingly short tabs but a large mating surface that make it wise to check everything it aligned properly before you leave the wings to set up. The main gear bays are moulded into upper wing skins, and detail is good, although some additional wiring would probably add more life. The mouldings are quite large, but there don't seem to have been any sink-marks on the upper surface, which is nice to see. There are a few shallow sink marks on the flaps though, but as they're on a flat surface, that shouldn't take more than a few minutes to resolve. The L-29 has a T-tail, which has a single full-width elevator, which is represented as a separate part, as is the rudder, which is made up from separate halves. This gives plenty of options for offset surfaces that give the aircraft a more candid look once complete. The landing gear parts are well detailed, with twin brake hoses running down the main legs, separate hubs to the main wheels, and retraction jacks that key neatly into both gear legs and the bays. The nose gear has a Y-shaped location/pivot point, plus a long retraction jack that extends high up into the nose. Gear bay doors are also well detailed, with the outer mains captive to the gear legs and inner doors hinging toward the centre line with retraction jacks added. The nose gear bay has a sliding rear door that sits flush with the underside of the fuselage, and a front door that hinges forward to deploy the gear, and then closes behind it. The Delfín has scabbed-on air-brakes that sit on the fuselage skin, and hinge out to slow the aircraft down using retraction jacks that sit within a small bay on the side of the fuselage. This is represented well by a pair of styrene parts with moulded in lightening holes on the inner face that sneakily hide some well-placed ejector pin marks. There is a bit of flash here on my example, which I will cut off using a new blade on my scalpel, so nothing untoward. The hinges are PE parts that affix to the leading edge of the brakes, and slot into two small depressions on the side of the fuselage. A pair of drop-tanks are provided for the underwing plyons. The canopy and nose bay cover can be posed open or closed, with the nose bay cover hinging forward on a substantial tab. The canopy is supplied as a three-part arrangement, with a fixed windscreen glued to the front, a side-opening front canopy with optional retaining strap if you pose it open, and a sliding rear canopy with a small bulkhead behind the cockpit opening. All parts are well moulded with defined framework, and are crystal clear, so with careful masking and painting should perform well. Markings One of the main things for this weekend boxing is the decals. There is a large sheet for the Tiger Stripe markings, a smaller sheet with national markings; and a third sheet for the airframe stencils. Markings for two aircraft are provided; 2853, 1st Flight, 11th Fighter Regiment, Czech Republic, 1993 (The Tiger stripped airframe) 1928, 3rd Air Base Malacky, Slovakia, 1993 Conclusion A welcome release from Eduard of the great AMK plastic with some great decals. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Bf.109G-2 Weekend Edition (84148) 1:48 Eduard The G variant of the 109, colloquially known as the Gustav was one of the primary fighters available to the Luftwaffe during the closing years of WWII, and saw extensive active service, all the while being upgraded to combat the increasing Allied superiority in the air. Happily for the Allies, the supply of experienced pilots was fast running out, so as good as the upgrades were, they couldn't make an appreciable difference to the outcome. The G-2 differed from the initial G-1 insofar as it eschewed the pressurised cockpit, and it was sometimes fitted with different head armour for the pilot. The Kit The G-2 is the latest of Eduard's series of Gustavs, which seems to be expanding nicely. Given the aforementioned differences between the sub-variants, there's not a huge amount of differences between the airframes The flying surfaces are all mobilised and capable of being depicted deflected one way or t'other, and Eduard have now released a set of hyper-detailed flying surfaces (648310) for the G series. There is a choice of tyres for your decal options. Another choice is offered for the clear windscreen part, with a common square profile canopy and fixed rear portion with the earlier larger aerial mast, which has the usual post for your choice of rigging material at the tail-end. With the prop added, it's just a case of choosing whether or not to add the additional armament in the shape of underslung cannons in gondola cowlings outboard of the landing gear bays. Markings As seems to be the case with weekend boxings, there are two decal options included on the larger decal sheet, and a set of stencils on the other sheet, which will allow you to build one of the following: Bf 109G-2/R6, flown by Hptm. Horst Carganico, CO of II./JG 5, Salmijärvi, Finland, May 1943 Bf 109G-2, flown by Maj. Hannes Trautloft, CO of JG 54, Eastern Front, summer 1942 The stencils are shown on a separate placement guide on the back page of the booklet, and both sheets are printed in-house on their by-now familiar vibrant blue paper, with good colour density, register and sharpness. In use these decals settle down well with a little solution, and the carrier film is closely cropped and slightly glossy. As always, there are some removable Swastikas at the corner of the main sheet, and some two-part decals that can be made into a Swastika by the modeller in territories where that's a difficult subject. Conclusion A very nice rendition of the G-2,with suitably disparate schemes that should appeal to many out of the box. The surface detail on these kits is by now legendary. The availability of the Weekend box makes for an affordable kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Resin and Photo Etch Detail Sets for Eduard/Hasegawa B-24 Liberator 1:72 Eduard Hasegawa's Liberator is easily the best kit of the type available in 1:72 scale. It is more modern and more precisely engineered than the ageing Minicraft/Academy kit and streets ahead of Airfix's venerable offering. It's selection by Eduard as the basis for their recent 'Riders in the Sky' limited edition Coastal Command release was very welcome indeed, particularly so given than Eduard's previous Liberator releases were based on the aforementioned Minicraft kit. Alongside the kit, Eduard have released a predictably comprehensive range of resin and photo etched goodies to further enhance the superlative kit. B-24 Engines (672171) This set includes four Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp turbo-supercharged radial engines. Despite the imposingly large box, the engines themselves are very simple. Each unit comprises the 14 cylinder engine, plus a separately cast magneto, as well as photo etched details for the ignition wiring. The casting is up to the usual Eduard standard and the end result will be superior to anything that could be achieved with injection moulded plastic. B-24 Bomb Bay Rocket Projector (672177) This impressive set provides the 3 inch rockets used with some Coastal Command Liberators, as well as the associated projector racks. The structural parts, as well as the rockets themselves, are cast from resin while photo etched brass provides a supporting role in the form of additional details for the rocket exhausts, ignition wiring, cross-braces etc. The set isn't as complex as it first seems, but the rockets are very fragile and particular care will need to be taken when removing them from their casting blocks. B-24 Bomb Bay Doors (672183) This simple set includes replacement bomb bay doors, as well as cogs for the door open/close mechanism. The parts are well cast and will offer a modest upgrade over the plastic parts provided with the kit. This set makes a good companion to the rocket set detailed above, but would clearly be of no interest if you intend to finish your model with the bomb bay doors closed! British 250lb Depth Charges (672172) Another simple set, this one provides six Mark VIII 250lb depth charges of the type used by Coastal Command on the Liberator. Each depth charge is a solid resin part, which must simply be painted Dark Green and have the included decals applied. Once complete, they will add a nice finishing touch to your Coastal Command Liberator. B-24 Wheels (672170) This set is intended as a like-for-like swap for the kit wheels. A choice of two different nose wheels are provided, as well as main wheels with optional resin and photo etched wheel hubs. As is the norm for a set of this type from Eduard, pre-cut masks are also provided to aid painting. These wheels, with their realistic tyre treads, offer a significant upgrade over the kit parts. B-24 Turbochargers (672178) The Twin Wasp used in the Liberator employed a turbocharger to supply compressed air to a mechanical supercharger. These turbochargers are one-piece items that offer a simple enhancement to the kit parts. They are well cast and nicely detailed, but you will need to carve away the plastic equivalents, which in the case of the Hasegawa kit, are partly moulded into the middle section of the engine cowling. The end result should be worth it, however. Liberator GR Mk.V upgrade set(73627) The only non-resin set on offer, this package includes pre-painted details for the crew compartment and fills in some of the details on the flight deck that were not covered by the etch provided with the kit. Details are provided for radio and other electronic equipment, as well as rudder pedals, ammunition hoppers and belts for the machine guns, as well as cooling sleeves for the gun barrels. Conclusion Eduard can hardly be accused of shyness when it comes to providing aftermarket for one of their marquee releases of the past 12 months. While some might think the banquet of resin on offer to be rather over the top, one is not obliged to use the whole lot. Instead, one is free to pick and choose according to taste and the perceived value of each addition. Personally I would start with the excellent resin wheels and go from there. What cannot be denied is the quality of the items on offer, with each offering considerable enhancement over the plastic equivalents (where relevant). Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Panther A Updates (36390, 36391 & 36392 for Takom) 1:35 Eduard There has been a rash of new King Tiger [/i]AND[/i] Panther models lately in the dominant 1:35 scale, with Takom amongst the competing camps. These sets have been designed with their kits in mind to provide detail upgrades, scale thickness parts and the anti-magnetic mine countermeasure paste that is called Zimmerit. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package (the larger ones using Ziplok bags), with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Upgrade Set (36390) This general set is spread over two frets of brass, one of which is nickel-plated and pre-painted. As this is an kit that includes the interior, the majority of this set consists of parts for the many shell storage boxes adding tons of detail and scale fidelity to these areas, with the rest of the set dedicated to replacing all the driver's instruments, radio boxes etc. with laminated and painted faces that offer much more realistic finishes whilst reducing the workload on the modeller. Late Zimmerit (36391) Zimmerit paste was a mixture of wood pulp and cement to resist the placing of magnetic mines on the hull as a slight overreaction to their use on the Eastern front. It was applied with trowels to most vertical and near vertical surfaces in a pattern, some of which were specific to the factory the vehicle was built in. This set is on two larger PE frets, and uses a thinner gauge of brass to make it conform better to the model. The sections are tailored specifically to the Takom kit, and this includes the kugelblende armour around the bow machine gun, which is best rolled to shape on a soft surface using a good sized marble or other hard ball to obtain the correct curvature, so lots of trial fittings will be appropriate there. Annealing the part will assist in this, making the brass more malleable. Holes in the brass match the fixtures moulded into the exterior, which is most evident on the hull sides under the fenders and on the rear bulkhead, with separate parts for the stowage boxes and multiple sections around the exhausts. The curved front fenders have multiple strips of PE Zimm that fit between the stiffening ribs, and each of the side-skirts (Schürtzen) have a Zimmerit panel keyed to their specific shape and size. The mantlet is another curved surface, and you are shown how to attach the PE to these parts for the best fit, starting at the top centre and working your way around. A few small raised areas will need to be removed before it can be fitted. Exterior (36392) A single sheet of brass containing new track stowage racks; pioneer tool details and shackles; fire extinguisher cage; clasps for the rear stowage boxes; jack block box, and a complete new holder for the barrel cleaning rod tube, with clasps and new end-cap skins for ultimate detail. Review sample courtesy of
  14. King Tiger Initial Updates (36386, 36387 & 36388 for Takom) 1:35 Eduard There has been a rash of new King Tiger models lately in the predominant 1:35 scale, with Takom amongst the competing camps. These sets have been designed with their kits in mind to provide detail upgrades, scale thickness parts and the anti-magnetic mine countermeasure paste that is called Zimmerit. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package (the larger ones using Ziplok bags), with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Upgrade Set (36386) This general set is on one square fret of brass, and includes detail parts for the commander's hatch; periscope blocks; padlocks for the hatches; new vision port armour for the front hatches, a host of new parts to detail the pioneer tools and their attachment points; fire extinguisher and jack block with mounts, and new mounts for the jack and track tools on the rear bulkhead. Zimmerit (36387) Zimmerit paste was a mixture of wood pulp and cement to resist the placing of magnetic mines on the hull as a slight overreaction to their use on the Eastern front. It was applied with trowels to most vertical and near vertical surfaces in a pattern, some of which were specific to the factory the vehicle was built in. This set is on two larger PE frets, and uses a thinner gauge of brass to make it conform better to the model. The sections are tailored specifically to the Takom kit, and this includes the kugelblende armour around the bow machine gun, which is best rolled to shape on a soft surface using a good sized marble or other hard ball to obtain the correct curvature, so lots of trial fittings will be appropriate there. Annealing the part will assist in this, making the brass more malleable. Holes in the brass match the fixtures moulded into the exterior, so little additional fitting will be required, but a small area near the rear mudflaps will need filling to give the zimmerit somewhere to adhere to. This is shown on the instructions to give you time to prepare the area. The mantlet is another curved surface, and you are shown how to attach the PE to these parts for the best fit, starting at the top centre and working your way around. The turret will need the lugs for hanging tracks removed before it can be fitted, and inserts are required for the early Porsche cupola, which projects from the side of the turret. A few small areas will also need filling such as the torch-cut lugs that give the joints more strength. Fenders (36388) Plastic fenders will never reach scale thicknesses, so brass is an ideal solution. The curved front fenders will need folding up into the correct curvature, and these also have strengthening ribs added to the inside, some of which might be best soldered, so that they don't suffer during handling during the rest of the build. An alternative angular set are provided that are suitable for two of the decal options, and these too would benefit from some soldering for strength. The side fenders are more simple, and should be bent to the same angles as the kit parts, with mounting blocks supplied to fit to the hull, which will be visible if you elect to show parts missing or damage, which often happened due to minor and literal fender-benders. The rear fenders are predominantly flat, with angled edges and triangular stiffeners, which would also benefit from soldering if you have the skills and/or soldering iron. Sometimes solder paste can be of use with small joints, and it's worth investing in a tube if you can track some down. one of the best uses for PE fenders is so that you can damage them in order to show an in-the-field likeness as is often seen in photos, as well as scale fidelity of the parts. Review sample courtesy of
  15. 1/72 - MiG-21 Fishbed family project was finally officially confirmed by Eduard http://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2015/info-eduard-2015-01CZ.pdf (english version soon) MF, bis and SMT versions expected first
  16. This aircraft was built from the Eduard premium kit with supplied brass etch and masks, only addition I made was the map in the cockpit. Painted with Mr Colour lacquer paints used with 400 leveller thinners. This interesting camouflage schemes were rendered on the aircraft of JG 54 by the unit’s ground personnel in the summer of 1940. They applied vertical to diagonal lines of RLM 71 in an attempt to darken the light blue fuselage sides. The standard scheme of 02/71/65 was applied, along with the quick identification attributes. The period scheme was applied to Yellow ‘13’, with which, on August 12, 1940, Lt. Josef Eberle managed to cross the Channel and belly land in France despite personal injury. The wingtips and fin of Eberle’s aircraft were painted RLM 27 Yellow, lighter than RLM 04 that the spinner, tactical number and background of the III./JG 54 emblem were painted. The bottom wing color RLM 65 extended marginally to the upper surface. Some sources erroneously identify this aircraft as an E-3. Despite having tempted fate once over the Channel, he was not as successful on October 9, 1940, when he lost his life in combat with RAF fighters. Thanks for looking
  17. Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies

    Heinkel He-111H-3 1H+FT

    This is one I should have photographed from the beginning but somehow just built instead. On the 12th of July 1940, this Arado built He111H-3 of III Gruppe / Kampfgeschwader 26 departed Stavanger Sola and headed south west to bomb targets in the Firth of Forth area (that's the big river estuary near Edinburgh for non-British). Making landfall at Leuchars (which was possibly the actual intended target?) in Fife, it was intercepted by Spitfires from 603Sqn at 12:55hrs at 10,000ft and driven north. The Heinkel reached Aberdeen at jettisoned its bomb load over the harbour area. These mostly landed on Hall Russell's ship yard and around the Footdee part of the city, killing several dozen civilians. The Neptune Bar (a grotty hole of a place, truth be told) was also hit! Pursued still by the Spitfires and probably surprised by a barrage of anti-aircraft fire from trawlers in the harbour and, I believe, guns at the Torry Battery site? Either way the aircraft was shot down in flames (there were many eye witnesses) and crashed into the newly completed ice rink building in the Garthdee area of the city - right beside what is now "Anderson Drive". One of the crew had evidently tried to bail out but his body was still half in the aircraft. Several crew members died, and were buried with military honours at the old Kirk cemetery which is about a mile north of Aberdeen's Dyce airport runway. In the Luftwaffe Crash Archive book Volume 1 by Nigel Parker, there are several more photographs included. The aircraft is wrecked, but there is just enough to confirm what seems to be a typical RLM70/71 over 65 scheme, with the fuselage demarkation in the higher position seen on reference photos (i.e. from leading edge of tailplane straight to trailing edge of wing). A photo of the underside of one of the wings loaded on to a wagon to remove from the crash site shows the letter "T" in black beside the cross, thus informing that this particular aircraft had the full 1H FT under the wings, not just a large "F" under each wing as is often seen. Knowing that, and that it was from III Gruppe, I knew it was very likely 70/71 over 65, with full lettering underneath, that the KG.26 emblem would be a black lion on a yellow field and that the propeller spinners and letter "F" on the fuselage sides were RLM04. I did look for a while but never did find a photograph of the whole aircraft intact. Be that as it may, I have gone with what I do know to be true on 12th July 1940. If someone does produce a picture that proves me wrong, I can build it again maybe The model itself is the old Revell 1/48 Heinkel He111H-6 kit which lived in my stash for many years. I understand this was one of the last toolings Monogram made and it has nice detail and nicely recessed panel lines. There were some moulding defects on the wing surfaces which needed some levelling, plus the usual sink marks in places and the fuselage was warped. This kit has a reputation for being a dog to build. Expectations suitably low, I found it better than I had prepared myself for it to be! It has an Eduard PE set inside it dressing up the cockpit a bit. With so much glazing the cockpit on this does matter so I felt it was worth putting in a little bit of effort there. The rest is just OOB though. It's quite well known that the Revell H-6 isn't actually a H-6. I don't pretend to be very interested in German stuff generally but I believe the H-6 should have had broader chord propellers etc. Hence, what's in the box is really a H-4. Having little inclination to go OTT on research which invariably leads to wholesale disappointment with kits like this, I did try to find out what the differences were between a H-3 and a H-4. I can't tell the difference. I have seen photographs captioned as H-3s with and without the foward cabin windows glazed, and with and without the front of the gondola thing glazed. As I've no photographs of the specific subject aircraft intact, I decided I was bored with abortive searches and decided to build a model I forgot to take any photographs along the way which is a pity. The cockpit is painted RLM66, and everything else inside is RLM02. The engine nacelles were a bit of a pain but a combination of trimming the wing fairings on the nacelles, and ramming some packing in between the top of the wheel wells and the bottom of the upper wing skin to spread them apart almost 1mm improved the fit hugely. They still needed a fair bit of time with filler and sanding sticks. Actually, most of the major joins needed filler, sanding and Olfa cutter remedial work! To make things easier, I also bought an Eduard canopy mask set. It must have been a Friday afternoon job there though as a significant percentage of the individual masks were not for this kit and ended up being Tamiya tape cut with a scalpel - exactly what I hoped to avoid (because I hate masking glazings). I enjoy playing with different toning effects. I know there are some I simply do not like, but I am always happy to try different things to see if I like each model better than the last. Sometimes it pays off, sometimes it doesn't. This one went ok I think? Now, here's where it becomes embarrassing. I *thought* I had this memorised and plowed on with decals and even posted this damned photo online, only for my buddy Stew to contact me quietly and very diplomatically point out that I was an absolute idiot for not having Luftwaffe Crash Archive Volume 1 open when I painted and applied the decals. Remember that demarkation line above and the 1H FT under the wings? Yep, got the BOTH wrong! Argh! I could have left it at that point, but I'm me and frankly I'd sooner jump up and down on it that finish it with such a stupid mistake, let alone two such stupid mistakes! That then escalated a bit. Moving the demarkation upwards with carefully de-tacked Tamiya tape still pulled off all the lettering. The big "F" letters under the wings from the same decal sheet however were ab-so-flippin-lutely welded on. Typical! Still, it's all done now though and I'm down to daft fiddly bits and some weathering to finish. The KG.26 emblems are on their way from a major US retailer. Occassionally we feel guilty taking a Friday off order processing. It took this outfit (which shall remain nameless - so don't ask) almost two weeks to get round to lifting the decal sheet off the shelf to post it.
  18. And here, my little beauty: A Spitfire 1/72 from Eduard, a really detailed kit, just in plastic there is a lot of details. The Spitfire is my favorite warbird, and the model from Eduard truly honor the legendary Spit. The kit is the first one that Eduard released, Nº70121. Spitfire Mk.IXc Late Version. With a beautiful box artwork. I remember when I was a little kid, 4 or 5 years old, my late father gave me my first airplane toy: a metal made Spitfire. That was first sight love. My father teach me about WWII (my grandpa was a prisoner in the Mauthausen concentration camp, in Austria), and about model kits. Every model I make I always think in my father, but this model in special goes for him. So father, wherever you are, you can fly far away in this little Spit... Ricardo
  19. GBU-43/B MOAB (648348) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast bomb is a 21,600lb bomb developed by the US Air Force research laboratory. The bomb follows on from the BLU-82 which was developed during the Vietnam war to clear landing zones in the Jungle. Years later during the continuing war in Afghanistan the BLU-82 was used and this lead to the USAF looking to develop a modern version of a large bomb. Like the BLU-82 the GBU-43/B is delivered from a C-130 Hercules cargo aircraft. The newer bomb though is larger than its predecessor and more accurate. It is reported that the USAF had 15 of these weapons made. The one and only use in combat was in April 2017 in Afghanistan. It is believed they have not been used more widely due to the the worry of killing non combatants. It should be noted that the weapon is a conventional filled bomb not a thermobaric weapon as had been reported, and it is not a penetrator weapon either. The weapon is coloquailly know as the "Mother of all bombs" and it has been claimed to be the biggest bomb dropped. However this is all down to definition. The RAF Grandslam bomb weighed in at 22,000lbs so technically heavier than the MOAB, however the MOAB has 18,700Lbs of explosive fill to the Grandslams approx 11,000Lbs due to it being a penetrating weapon with a much heavier casing. Kit I will call this a kit rather than an accessory as it is a kit in its own right. It arrives on one of Eduard's BIGSIN type boxes and inside are 18 resin parts, 7 large sheets of etched brass and a small decal sheet. The kit is for the bomb itself and its large transport cradle. There are many folds to the etched brass and it makes you wonder if some of the parts would not be better in plastic or resin in this scale. The underside of the transport cradle is made up first, ten its flipped over. Next the support beams are built up and added to the top of the cradle. With interlocking side frames and longitudinal ones care will need to be made to get it all lining up. The bomb itself is fairly simple to make up consisting of three main parts, nose extended detenators and the rear fins. These can be made folded or extended. Care will be needed to remove these from the pour blocks. PE parts are added to the bomb when complete. Two sets of markings are provided. One for an example (hopefully innert) displayed at the Elgin Air Force Armament Museum in a striking John Deere Green colour scheme. A second is for a combat ready weapon. Dare I say it but it is the Mother of All Bomb Kits! It should make up into a good looking kit which no doubt will generate some discussion. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. Ready for inspection are my pair of 1:72 Spitfire's. The first being Airfix's Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1a, and the second Eduard's Spitfire Mk.IX (from its Royal Class kit). My aim was to compare the kits as I built them, simplicity Vs complexity at its greatest. The Airfix kit comprised a minimal amount of sprues, decals and instructions. The Eduard kit contained bags of sprues, pe, tonnes of decals and an instruction booklet to rival war and peace. Both kits went together well, both delivering problems when it came to securing the fuselage to the wings......tight fit is an understatement! That said, the rest of the journey was painless, and I am really happy with the results. Thanks for looking.
  21. I thought it time to tackle another Spitfire build (everyone loves building a spit.......right??), and couldn't decide which kit to go for so I have decided to build 2 at the same time (along with my Dornier build, already underway). So here goes......2 very different kits, one appearing simple, one sublime, but both recreating a Spitfire (although different variants). My first kit is Airfix's trusty Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1a, I plan to finish this build with the traditional half black underside and as an out of the box build. The kit comprises 2 grey sprues, all nicely detailed with little flash. There aid also a small clear sprue, and decal sheet. The second kit is Eduard's 1:72 Royal class Spitfire Mk.IX. This is part of a kit that gives you 4 Spits to build. The box contains beautiful colour instructions, 14 colour schemes and decals to choose from, pe parts, resin parts, beer mat and beautiful beer glass. I am planning to build Mk.IXe, as flown by Maj. Vasiliy A. Matsyevich, CO of 26th GIAP 1945 (partly because my son loves the paint scheme). There are 5 grey sprues, with no flash and lots of fine detail, and a clear sprue. There is also a small sheet of pe parts, resin wheels, a small decal sheet with common parts, and a larger one with specific decals. It looks a stonking kit, and I can't wait to get started.
  22. We've just got some cheap Eduard 1/48 Typhoons in stock for only £27 and some 1/72 Spitfire IX 'Longest Day' double kits in for only £18!!! On top of that we also have a number of Eduard Spitfire kits in for bargain prices in both 1/48 and 1/72! Please see the list below and click on the links for more info! 1/48 Typhoon - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk11117-148-hawker-typhoon-mk-ib-bubble-canopy-ltd-ed-6431-p.asp 1/48 Spitfire IXe (For Israel) £21 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk11111-148-supermarine-spitfire-mkixe-spitfire-for-israel-6044-p.asp 1/48 Spitfire IXc (early) Profipack £22.80 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk8282-148-supermarine-spitfire-mkixc-early-2874-p.asp 1/48 Spitfire IXe Profipack £21 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk8283-148-supermarine-spitfire-mkixe-3192-p.asp 1/48 Spitfire HF MK VIII Profipack £18.80 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk8287-148-supermarine-spitfire-hf-mkviii-profipack-6229-p.asp 1/48 Spitfire Mk IXe Weekend £12.80 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk84138-148-supermarine-spitfire-mkixe-weekend-3562-p.asp 1/48 Spitfire Mk XVI Weekend £12.20 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk84141--148-supermarine-spitfire-mkxvi-bubbletop-weekend-4819-p.asp 1/72 Spitfire Mk XVI Dual Combo £18.00 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk2117-172-supermarine-spitfire-mkxvi-dual-combo-5349-p.asp 1/72 Spitfire Mk IX Triple set £36.60 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk2120-172-the-boys-are-back-in-town---supermarine-spitfire-ix-triple-set-6003-p.asp 1/72 Spitfire Mk IX Dual Combo (Longest Day) £18 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk2125-172-supermarine-spitfire-mkix-longest-day-dual-combo-6414-p.asp 1/72 Spitfire Royal Class Quad kit set £40.00 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edkr013-172-supermarine-spitfire-mkix-royal-class-5224-p.asp 1/72 Spitfire F Mk IXc Profipack £10.50 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk70122-172-supermarine-spitfire-f-mkix-5444-p.asp 1/72 Spitfire Mk VIII Profipack £9.80 - https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk70128-172-supermarine-spitfire-mk-viii-profipack-6351-p.asp As you can see, not only Bargain Typhoons but more Spitfire offers than you can shake a huge stick at! thanks Mike
  23. B-2 Spirit BigEd Updates (BIG72136) 1:72 Eduard In case you're unaware, Eduard's Big ED sets are a great way to purchase all the sets you want for your model whilst availing yourself of a bulk purchase discount that can be quite tempting. The set arrives in a large cardboard envelope with the Big ED branding and a sticker in the top left that details what's inside. Within the envelope the sets are all still individually packaged to protect the frets from shuffling past each other and getting damaged until you're ready to use them. This time it's the new B-2 Spirit from ModelCollect (reviewed here) that receives their attention with five sets that add some impressive detail. Bomb Bay (72663) This large (A5) bare brass set contains a complete set of details for the main bomb bay, requiring all the raised details to be removed beforehand apart from the central spine, which is still skinned with new PE parts. The front and rear bulkheads are decked out with new skins and detail parts, the sidewalls have all new parts too, and the ribs along the roof of the bay are replaced by two-part PE ribs that have a T-shaped profile and curve to fit the shape of the bay. The front of the bay has spoilers added to disrupt the airflow enough to allow the bombs to drop out, and down the centre of the bay a set of stanchions along the spine of the bay holds the attachment beam for the centre bay doors, which gives the outward impression that it has two bays side by side. The kit's Multiple Ejector Racks that carry the bombs will need a small amount trimming from each end to cater for the two layers of PE on the bulkheads, with a scrap diagram showing where they should mount. Finally, a sheet of paper is included that has templates for the bomb bay doors printed in case you would like to make your own doors from thinner styrene for added realism. Either that, or you could opt for the Bay Doors set below. You will need some 0.3mm and 0.4mm wires, plus some lengths of 0.6mm styrene to complete this set, so check your stores before commencing work. Undercarriage (72664) This set completely replaces all the detail within the three gear bays, as well as the bay doors themselves. To maintain the strength of the assemblies however, the new PE skins are fitted within the existing kit bays, which must first have all their raised detail removed. More raised parts are added to the new skins for a more realistic look, with hinges and their pivot-points added to the bay sides. These are then attached to the new gear bay covers, which are laminated up and have extra parts attached to their inner skins, then linked to their hinge-points with styrene rod actuators from your own stock of 0.6mm rod. Bomb Bay Doors (72665) If you choose not to make your own doors from styrene, this set may be for you, as it completely replaces the kit bomb bay doors, and also adds all of the delicate framework that is simplified on the kit. The set is bare brass of A5(ish) size, and each door begins as a piece of flat PE that is laminated to a framework, onto which the new ribs fit, which are then attached to the actuator arms that are included in this set. You will need some 0.3mm wire to complete the job, so ensure you have some on hand. Interior (73624) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles that surround the pilots are the primary parts on the painted set, with new controls; ejection seat details and seatbelts; a complete new crew access tunnel and ladder is fabricated, and a pair of new intake lips are also supplied, which I guess are near the cockpit. Masks (CX504) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Typhoon Wheels & Exhaust Stacks (648412, 648413 & 648414 for Eduard/Hasegawa) 1:48 Eduard Brassin It's no secret that Hasegawa plastic is found in the latest Limited Edition from Eduard, which you can read about here, and Eduard can always improve on what's in the kit, which they already have done. For the truly detail hungry modeller though, they often release additional sets, which we have here. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Wheels Early & Late (648412 & 648413) Both these sets contain the same components, with the main difference being seen in the inner and outer hub shape, which although subtle is there. You get two resin main wheels with a high level of detail in the tyre and hub, plus a tail wheel in white resin, and masks for all three wheels (not pictured), so you can paint those demarcations easily. They're a big improvement on the kit parts, which are bland and a little over-weighted. Early Wheels Late Wheels Exhaust Stacks (648414) These are a simple drop-in replacement for the kit parts with just two pieces in the box, and nice hollow stacks as you can see from the photo. Simply cut them off their blocks and install them with a dab of super glue. Review sample courtesy of
  25. After Kovozávody Prostějov (link) Eduard is also working on 1/72nd Zlín/LET Z-37A Čmelák (Bumblebee) kits for 2019. Source: 3D renders published in Modelář magazine "Z-37 Bumblebee. The manufacturer is anonymous but should be domestic - "Z-37 Čmelák. Výrobce zatím zůstává v anonymitě, ale měl by být domácí"." and Scalemates link V.P.
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