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Found 11 results

  1. KDA-1 (Q-2A) Firebee US Drone (48402) 1:48 ICM People think drones are a new thing for the military but in reality they are not. The Firebee was developed by Ryan for the new USAF in 1948 as a jet powered gunnery target with the first flight being in 1951. The USAF Designation was Q-2A, and when the US Navy bought them they designated them KDA-1. The original Firebees were air launched from a modified A-26, or ground launched using a RATO system. The system was later used by the US Army as well. Q-2Bs were fitted with a modified engine for higher altitudes. They were developed over time with the KDA-4 being the main USN version, however differences were mainly internal. The Royal Canadian Air Force purchased 30 KDA-4s which were launched from an Avro Lancaster Mk.10DC. The Kit This kit is a brand new tool from ICM, no doubt as a tie in for their new tool 1/48 Invaders as a Drone controller is due out. They will make interesting models though in their own right, or can be added to other models. The kit arrives on one sprue for the Drone (with 2 in this boxing) The model will be just over 100mm long when built. Here unlike the original boxing there is no ground trailer in the box so these will just be for hanging from a kit as the pylons are on the sprue. Construction is fairly basic and starts with the full length intake/exhaust for the engine. The rear engine part is installed inside the tube and it can then go together. At the front a forward baffle/bulkhead goes in and then the nose bullet goes in front of that. This can then be installed in the main body and it can be closed up. The left and right main wings are two parts upper & lower, these have a V tab on them for where they join inside the main body. The tail planes are single piece. Tip tanks go on the end of each main wing, with arrow shaped end caps on the tail planes. A faring goes on the top of the drone. Decals Three options are provided for on the decal sheet: US Navy XQ-2 Prototype Red/White as seen on the box art. USAF Q-2A Firebee 1951 - Overall Red. USN KDA-1 Firebee 1960 China Lake - Yellow/Red The decals look nicely printed. Conclusion This is a good looking kit which will look good hanging under a model, or built as a standalone model. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  2. BQM-34A (Q-2C) Firebee with trailer (48401) 1:48 ICM People think drones are a new thing for the military but in reality they are not. The Firebee was developed by Ryan for the new USAF in 1948 as a jet powered gunnery target with the first flight being in 1951. The USAF Designation was Q-2A, and when the US Navy bought them they designated them KDA-1. The original Firebees were air launched from a modified A-26, or ground launched using a RATO system. The system was later used by the US Army as well. Q-2Bs were fitted with a modified engine for higher altitudes. They were developed over time with the KDA-4 being the main USN version, however differences were mainly internal. The Royal Canadian Air Force purchased 30 KDA-4s which were launched from an Avro Lancaster Mk.10DC. In the late 1950s the USAF Awarded Ryan a contract for a new second generation Firebee this would become the BQM-34A or Q-2C. This was a bigger airframe with longer wings. One of the main recongition features was the fact the original nose intake was replaced by a chin intake for the new Continental J69-T-29A turbojet. As well as the USAF and USN the US Army had a ground launched (With Rocket assist) designated the MQM-34D, this version having a longer wing than the USAF & USSN ones. The main launch aircraft for these new drones was the DC-130. While initial production ended in 1982 the production line was re-opened in 1989 to produce more targets. These BQM-34S featured improved avionics and a new J85-GE-100 engine. The Kit This kit is a brand new tool from ICM, following on from their original kit. Like that a trailer is also supplied. These will also no doubt be a nice addition to one of their Invader kits at some point The kit arrives on one sprue for the Drone, and a second for the trailer. The model will be just over 145mm long when built. Construction is fairly basic and starts with the full length intake/exhaust for the engine. The engine is installed inside the main body and it can be closed up, a triangular inert goes in the top. The left and right main wings are single parts, these have tabs on them for where they join inside the main body to lock together. The tail planes are also single part with tabs again to lock in place. single piece. End plates are added to the tail planes and the rudder goes on the top. The ground handling trolley is more complicated than the original. the main U support frame is built up then this adds to the side rails with a rear cross member for strength. Two axle supports go on, and then the wheels fit to these. A tow bar adds to the front. Decals Three options are provided for on the decal sheet: USN BMQ-34, Naval Base Ventura County (overall red as the box art) USN BMQ-34, 36 Mission markings. (Red with Yellow wingtips and a checker board tail) USAF BQM-34, Wallace Air Station. (Red with Yellow wingtips) USN BQM-34, circa 2000s in overall white. The decals look nicely printed, in register with no issues. Conclusion This is a good looking kit which will look good hanging under a model, or built as a standalone model. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  3. KDA-1 (Q-2A) Firebee with trailer (48400) 1:48 ICM People think drones are a new thing for the military but in reality they are not. The Firebee was developed by Ryan for the new USAF in 1948 as a jet powered gunnery target with the first flight being in 1951. The USAF Designation was Q-2A, and when the US Navy bought them they designated them KDA-1. The original Firebees were air launched from a modified A-26, or ground launched using a RATO system. The system was later used by the US Army as well. Q-2Bs were fitted with a modified engine for higher altitudes. They were developed over time with the KDA-4 being the main USN version, however differences were mainly internal. The Royal Canadian Air Force purchased 30 KDA-4s which were launched from an Avro Lancaster Mk.10DC. The Kit This kit is a brand new tool from ICM, no doubt as a tie in for their new tool 1/48 Invaders as a Drone controller is due out. They will make interesting models though in their own right, or can be added to other models. The kit arrives on one sprue for the Drone, and a second for the stand. The model will be just over 100mm long when built. Construction is fairly basic and starts with the full length intake/exhaust for the engine. The rear engine part is installed inside the tube and it can then go together. At the front a forward baffle/bulkhead goes in and then the nose bullet goes in front of that. This can then be installed in the main body and it can be closed up. The left and right main wings are two parts upper & lower, these have a V tab on them for where they join inside the main body. The tail planes are single piece. Tip tanks go on the end of each main wing, with arrow shaped end caps on the tail planes. A faring goes on the top of the drone. The ground handling trolley is one main base part to which the 3 wheels are added. On top there is a rear A frame support and a front inverted U. The drone hangs from the front support and sits on the rear one. A pylon Decals Three options are provided for on the decal sheet: US Navy XQ-2 Prototype Red/White as seen on the box art. USAF Q-2A Firebee 1951 - Overall Red. USN KDA-1 Firebee 1960 China Lake - Yellow/Red The decals look nicely printed. Conclusion This is a good looking kit which will look good hanging under a model, or built as a standalone model. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Hello, Here's my just finished 1/72 Ryan BQM-34A Firebee. It's the Plusmodel kit, they do several boxings of this kit and this version comes with a little resin and PE transport dolly. The Firebee itself is injection molded. It's a simple little kit, the whole thing took me about a week to finish. The kit allows you to do it as several USAF ones, all in the same scheme just with different serials, a white and black US Navy one, and this brightly coloured US Navy one. Painted with Tamiya and MRP paints. Thanks for looking, I hope you like it.
  5. This is my 1/72 Gyrodyne QH-50C DASH (Drone Anti-Submarine Helicopter) 3D printed by Shapways. My understanding is that these were used as anti-submarine homing torpedo delivery devices for ships had sonar and other submarine sensors but that were too small to carry a full size helicopter such as a SH-3 Sea King. As anyone that has tried to fly an RC helicopter can attest they were very hard to fly, especially with 1960's technology, so they were somewhat dangerous and accident prone and were eventually replaced by SH-2 Seasprites. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyrodyne_QH-50_DASH for more information. It comes from Shapeways as a 3d printed block: with an instruction sheet The block also has a template for the wire used for struts, and the landing gear You just need to supply the .02 wire, .01 wire and decals. I could not find any suitable .01 wire so I either left it out or used the .02 wire. Once separated from the block you have the following parts Because of the way the 3D printing process works all of the hole for the wires are "printed" into the pieces and just need to be cleaned out of the printing powder with a small drill bit. Also because of the printing process the parts have some striations and are little grainy. After printing they tumble them to clean and polish them smooth but this doesn't get into all the nooks and crannies of the block so some clean up is required. Because of this I used Eduard Brassin Mk. 44 torpedoes rather end the one supplied. Assembly was straight forward. I used CAA glue and epoxy. And hear is the results. Here it is between an SH-3 and SH-2 for size comparison Next up is the Olimp/ProResin Edo OSE-1 floatplane. Enjoy
  6. Just finished this, the 1/72 Attack Squadron resin kit of the autonomous Fire Scout helicopter. It's small in this scale but really well cast with PE for some of the smaller parts. The kit is now sold under the Brengun label.
  7. This is the next to last installment of my "Large" drone project. These are the smaller large drones and since they are so small and they all get the same color I built them all together. They are the RQ-2A Pioneer, RQ-5B Hunter, RQ-7B Shadow, MQ-8B Fire Scout and the MQ-8C Fire Scout. The first 2 are by Unicraft (spit) and the last 3 are from Attack Squadron. To keep any post from getting too big I will add a post for each model to this thread. Starting with the RQ-2A First some general comments. These range from really tiny to just small in size, they are pretty monochromatic, and they are all resin. Given that they were very quick builds. I am not going to belabor the poor quality of the Unicraft kits other then to say that as far as resin kits go, they are the bottom of the heap. For more details seem my WIP thread on their YO-3 at In stark contrast the Attack Squadron kits are really excellent and a pleasure to build. They had real detailed step buy step instruction and great decals. It is just a pity they are no longer in production and I just hope that their new owner, Brengun, can keep up the quality. But enough droning on and on to the pictures.
  8. Gloster Meteor U.16/U.21 Drone Conversion set 1:48 Red Roo Models The Meteor like many operational aircraft found a new lease of life following its retirement from front line operational duties as a drone aircraft. These acted as both manned and unmanned target for the military. In the UK these flew as the U.16 and in Australia the U.21 as conversions of the F.8. The wingtips were modified, the nose was changed and various aerial fits were made. The cannons were removed as the spaces were used for additional electronics. The conversion from Red Roo features a new nose cone, wingtip extensions and pods, plus various different lengths of wire for the aerials. While the conversion was originally for the Classic Airframes kit it will fit the new Airfix Meteor. The new nose fits the fuselage well but the modeller will have to thin the resin of the replacement nose in order to accommodate the front landing gear assembly. The modeller will also have to remove the kit wing tips, and the cannon fairings. Decals in the form of serial numbers are provided for WK797, WH460 & WE902 of the RAF. Also A77-884, A77-207 & A77-882 of the RAAF. Conclusion This is a great little conversion from Red Roo which enables one of these 6 Australian Drones to be built, or any other U.16/U.21 with the modeller's own decals. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. North American/Fiat QF-91C In 1961 the US DoD authorised the loan of two Luftwaffe Fiat G.91s for trials by the US Army. These were flown alongside Douglas A4D-2 Skyhawks and a Northrop N-156 (F-5 prototype). One was an Italian built G.91R-1, c/n 0052 that served with the Luftwaffe (BD+102) whilst the other was a German built G.91R-3 (c/n 0065) Luftwaffe EC+105. Although all three types were highly regarded none were deemed suitable for the role of Close Air Support or Forward Air Controller. Rumours abound that this decision was based on political grounds as the US Army could not be seen to fly foreign, (G91), Navy (A4D) or High performance USAF types (F-5) .... In 1965, however, with the US deeply embroiled in the Vietnam war the lack of a dedicated CAS aircraft to replace the venerable A-1 became far too visible. With the USAF reluctant to give up it's F-100s, even though they themselves needed replacement, the US Army dusted off it's reports and looked again at the G91, albeit now in the new Y variant, much favoured with it's twin engines and greater performance. New trials once again proved the validity of the dedign and with minor changes the type was authorised for production under license by North American Aviation. By 1970 the type had virtually replaced to A-1 and had also been adopted by the Airforce as a F-100 replacement. It went on to have an excellent service record both in combat and peacetime up until it's withdrawal in the late 1980s. It was not the end though and many airframes had a 2nd life awaiting for them. Post Vietnam cutbacks meant the conversion of F-102,106 and F-4s to the unmanned drone role was under threat. North American jumped in and utilised the experience acquired from the successful QF-86 and QF-100 programs to offer a lower cost solution. Slowly the ranks of F-91Cs sunning in the desert shrank as the majority of airframe not allocated to museums or the spares pile, were returned to flying condition with the ubiquitous bright red markings associated with their new lease of life. Some were mostly grey, others mostly green, a few had 2 or 3 colour camouflage, and a rare couple had special schemes. One thing was agreed upon by all - even the anonymous birds looked spectacular in their new feathers.
  10. So despite emptying a tin of enamel paint over my leg while doing so, I ended up finishing this rather small build, an Italieri RQ-1 Predator UAV. Parts of the kit lacked a bit in quality (looking at the propeller blade) but still, could have been worse and I'm quite happy with the neat way it has turned out. Was painted with Humbrol 127 Ghost Grey enamel, tamiya acrylics and Citadel Devlan Mud wash.
  11. Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird with D-21B Drone Hasegawa 1:72 Rather than repeat the great review done by our very own Paul AH HERE this review will concentrate on the drone as the SR-71 is exactly the same. The kit does come in a very attractive open top box with an artists impression of the aircraft, complete with drone, at speed climbing through the clouds. Inside you get the upper and lower halves of the fuselage/wings plus two sprues of black styrene and one small sprue of clear styrene. The plastic is really quite hard and brittle which doesn’t bode well for cutting out. Being the same kit as the Gravestone version the build of the parent aircraft is exactly the same. The only difference in this version is the inclusion of the D-21B drone. Which is assembled from upper and lower fuselage sections with the wings pre-moulded just like the SR-71. To this assembly the exhaust nozzle is fitted aft along with the fin, whilst at the front the two piece nose section with pre-moulded pitot probe is fitted at the front. The pylon on which the drone is mounted is a two piece affair which went assembled is fitted to the parent aircraft through two slots that need to be opened up before the main fuselage pieces are glued together. The slots are well marked on the inside so shouldn’t prove too much of a problem to open and clean up. With the pylon in place and both aircraft and drone painted up the drone can be fitted in position. Decals The decal sheet not only provides the cockpit instrument panels and side consoles, but also a complete set of wing walk stripes, stencils and insignia. The choice of two aircraft can be built these are:- • US Air Force Test Aircraft 17950 with D-21B Drone 507 based at Area 51with both aircraft in overall black scheme • US Air Force Test Aircraft 06940 with D-21 Drone based at Area 51 in silver and black scheme with the drone overall silver with the nose and wing leading edges in black. Conclusion This is not the most complex kit in the world to build but it will require a good paint job to bring out the interesting nature of the beasts. I personally prefer the silver scheme as it contrasts nicely with the all black model normally seen. I’m not sure of the plastic Hasegawa use in this kit as it does seem extraordinarily hard compared with their other kits and I’m not sure how well it will react with normal liquid poly that I use. Still, it’s an interesting subject and will look good in any collection. Walkround photos available HERE Review sample courtesy of UK distributors for
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