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Found 3 results

  1. Search & Rescue Vessel Hermann Marwede Platinum Edition (05198) Revell 1:72 - Limited Edition The Hermann Marwede is the largest rescue vessel operated by the German Society For Sea Rescue or Die Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) to give them their correct German title. Like many such organisations of its type the DGzRS receive no government funding but rely on voluntary contributions to finance the organisation. The DGzRS was founded in 1865 by uniting many smaller organisations, and now celebrates its 150th Anniversary. It is interesting to note that during WWII they operated under the Red Cross and upheld their principles of rescuing anyone in distress. They have know grown into an organisation with 60 lifesaving vessels in 54 stations on the German Coastline. It is estimated over 82000 people have been saved by the organisation since its founding. Please visit the DGzRS website if you wish to read more about the organisation. The vessel was built by Fassmer in Berne and launched in 2003. She is 46m Long with a beam of 10.66m, a top speed of 25 Knots; with power being provided by three 9250 Shaft hp diesel engines each driving it's own shaft. The unrefuelled range is nearly 4000 Kms. The vessel features a fully equipped hospital unit, helicopter landing pad, fire-fighting water canons, and a stern launched rescue boat. The Hermann Marwede is stationed on the island of Helgoland. The vessel is named after Hermann Marwede a co-founder of the Becks Brewery (very apt for sailors), he was a past president of the DGzRS. Construction of the vessel was in the main funded by donations from the Marwede family. The Kit The first thing you notice about the kit is the sheer size of the box. It has to be this big to contain all of the plastic! Filling one side is a single piece hull, a further 8 sprues of white plastic, and one clear sprue. Construction starts inside the main hull with the fitting of the two bow thruster units. These each have their individual propellers fitted before the units are mounted to the hull. Then on the outside of the hull the three shafts, their propellers and individual rudders are fitted. The bow anchor is also fitted at this time. Once the outside of the main hull is finished it can be mounted on the supplied stands to aid the rest of the construction. The forward hull sides along with the forward railings are then fitted. Life-rafts are fitted to the rear bulkhead of the main deck. The main deck forward and aft is added into the hull at this stage, along with the stern bulkhead of the vessel. The instructions have the modeller adding the hull fenders at this stage. Though as these are a different colour to the main hull they are perhaps best left until last? Once the decks are in place construction moves to the aft main deck, and in particular the launching ramp for the fast rescue craft with work being done in this area to construct where the rescue craft will sit. The main deck railings are the next to be added, with smaller sections on the stern of the vessel. Once the railings are fitted a whole host of deck fittings need to be added on. Winches, bollards, deck hatches, life rafts, and an anchor windlass are all to be fitted. Next on the construction agenda is the upper deck house. This is assembled along with the ladders and railings which lead down to the main deck. A main towing winch is assembled and added behind the main deck superstructure. More railings and deck fittings are added at the deck house level. Next the pilot house / bridge deck level is added. Even though there is glazing all around this there is no interior at all provided. In this scale I would suggest this something Revell missed. Once this section is complete the deck mounted crane can be assembled. The next major area for construction (and the last) is the deck house / helicopter landing pad which is built over the fast rescue boat launching area. The plastic does a good job of simulating the steel texture of this area, though some sort of photo-etch would have been much better. The area also has its railings and ladders added at this time. Moving back to the main structure three fire-fighting cannons are assembled and installed behind the bridge. Three search light units are assembled and added to the forward top of the bridge. Then a whole host of aerials, antenna, and other items are added to the bridge roof. The last item to be added in this area is the mast arrangement. This also carries a wide range of radar antenna, navigation lights, and other aerials which all need to be added. The completed mast can then be installed onto the vessel. The last items for construction is the fast rescue craft, and the stern door which opens to allow it to be launched. In this scale the fast rescue boat is a kit in its own right. The main hull is split into upper and lower sections. Once these are together the deck house is built up on top of the boat. A full interior control section is supplied as this can be seen from the partially open rear area and rear mesh screen. Again the plastic here gives a good impression in this scale but a touch of PE would go a long way. Once the launch is completed it can be mounted in the vessel or used separately in a diorama setting. Decals The decal sheet is fairly small considering the size of the kit. The decals in this boxing are printed in Italy so there should be no Issues. The Platinum Parts This is what this boxing is all about. I know Eduard had made some PE sets for this kit and that's what I was expecting in the box; however it would appear these are new seta from Revell. There are two large Nickel frets, a large brass fret, and a smaller Nickel fret of PE parts. As well as this there are a whole host of brass parts as well. These are all accompanied by a set of colour CAD instructions for their construction and placement. As good as these instructions are they layout is not flowing and some parts on the frets I fail to find on the instructions? The PE parts are mainly for the Doors, Window frames, ladders, bulwark details, structure details, bridge protection bulwark, masts, hatches capstans, aerial frames, fire fighting monitors, and life rafts. There are some parts marked not for use on the PE set 1, these look to be errors only noticed later and corrected on the 4th small fret. No details for the railings or more surprisingly the heli deck, or small rescue boat are in the set. Perhaps they are relying on the modeller finding the Eduard sets for these? As well as the PE sets Revell offer 37 brass parts with the kit. These include 16 mast lamps, 4 antennas, 3 mast poles, 2 capstans, and 1 each of a horn, light, hook, staff, rigging pole, and fire pipe. All of these brass items look to be first class. Some of these will combine with the PE items for the masts to make them stand out. Conclusion Even though the kit is oldish now this is only its third release so the molds are as good as ever. The inclusion of the PE and Brass bring this more into line with what serious modellers are expecting these days, however it does feel like some areas have been ignored with these sets. Recommended if you want a kit of this vessel with the additional PE and brass parts. Currently, Revell are unable to ship to the UK from their online shop due to recent changes in import regulations, but there are many shops stocking their products where you can pick up the kits either in the flesh or online. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit
  2. Search and Rescue "Good Bye" Set 1/72 Revell (05683) For decades, the sea rescue cruisers of the Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) and the Sea King helicopters of the German Navy have been part of the Search and Rescue (SAR) service in all weather conditions on the North and Baltic Seas. One of the most enduring aircraft of the post-war period, the Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King flew for the first time in 1959. Although no longer in production, the Sea King continues to serve with air arms around the world, including those of Canada, Germany India, Ireland, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom. Just as they had done with earlier Sikorsky designs such as the S-55/H-19 Chickasaw (produced in the UK as the Whirlwind) and S-58 Choctaw (Wessex), Britain’s Westland Helicopters secure a licence to produce the Sea King not long after the aircraft made its first flight. Westland’s first variant was the anti-submarine HAS.1. This was followed by the heavily modified troop carrying version, initially produced as the Commando for the Egyptian Air Force, but also used by the Royal Navy where it was known as the HC4. Other UK produced Sea Kings included the HAR3/3A search and rescue helicopter, and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) variants. The Mk.41 Sea King depicted by Revell in this kit was the export version of the HAS.1 supplied to the German Navy in the mid-1970s. The Berlin was operated by The Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) or German Maritime Search and Rescue Association. From 55 stations in the Baltic and on the North Sea Coast they operate a fleet of vessels for maritime Search and Rescue, It is financed entirely by donations. The Berlin was in service from 1985 to 2017 and one of the most powerful sea rescue vessel with a Diesel power train developing 1200KW. The vessel has since been replaced by a new one with the same name. Search and Rescue Vessel "Berlin" Here Revell have re-boxed their 1988 kit of the Berlin. As well as the hull casting there are 6 sprues of white plastic and a clear sprue. The first thing to be built up is the supplied stand to display your model on. Next up on the lower hull rudders and propellers are added on. Now the hull can be flipped and the main deck attached. To this is added the main deck house is built up and added. To the top of this is added the bridge where the vessel is controlled from. Next up is the main mast which holds the antennas and radars. At the rear of this top deck the firefighting cannons are built up and added. On the fore deck the bulwarks go on and then railings on the top o them. The railings are straight and will have to be bent to shape using hot water. The rest of the railings and fenders go on down the sides. On the aft deck fittings go in place for the rear launched smaller rescue boat. Once all the fittings are in place the actual smaller boat can be built and added in. One marking option is provided for on the decal sheet which is from Cartograf so there will be no issues with it. The option is for the Berlin, there are also declas for the stand. The Sea King Here Revell have re-boxed their excellent kit, the SAR 45th Year boxing was released in 2012 and the tool is still good today. It is comprised of just over 150 parts moulded in light grey plastic. The kit is pretty modern, having been tooled in the late nineties. As such, it dates from a period during which Revell were enjoying something of a purple patch, churning out some outstanding kits in 1:72 scale such as their Panavia Tornado, McDonnell Douglas Phantom II and General Dynamics F-16 to name just three. The mouldings are clean and crisp and there do not appear to be any flaws in the plastic. Surface detail is comprised of fine, recessed panel lines and delicate, raised rivet detail, which replicates the skin of the Sea King very accurately. The kit is equipped with a well-appointed cockpit, comprised of the pilot’s and co-pilot’s seats, centre console, cyclic and collective controls and yaw control pedals. The rest of the cabin is equally nice and includes additional crew seats and folding passenger seats. There are a number of additional interior parts marked ‘not for use’ on the sprues that can be used to build other versions of the Sea King. The optional cabin windows are flashed over and so some plastic must be cut away in order to build the Mk. 41 depicted on the decal sheet. The choices don’t stop with the interior, however. Revell have provided plenty more options on the sprues. There is a choice of engine intake guards (including, of course, the option not to fit them at all) and five or six blade tail rotors. You also have the option of both the small upper fuselage radome and the larger radome fitted to the HAS.5/HU.5 and HAS.6. There are plenty of other options too, but you’ll need to pore over your sources if you have a particular aircraft in mind, as not all of them are dealt with in the instruction manual. The main rotor blades are of the later, composite type, but Revell have provided a diagram which shows you how to backdate them to the earlier, metal type. The rotor head is very nicely detailed. If I have one gripe with this kit, it’s that it doesn’t include the option to depict the rotors in the folded position without some surgery. This is by no means a deal breaker, but it would have been helpful, particularly as helicopters tend to take up a lot of space on the shelf! As an extra bonus, four Sea Skua anti-ship missiles have been provided as well. If you don’t want to use them when you build the kit, they will come in handy for the spares box. One marking option is provided for on the decal sheet which is from Cartograf so there will be no issues with it. The option is; Westland Sea King Mk.41 ’45 Jahre SAR’ of Marinefliegergeschwader 5, 2003; Conclusion A good chance to pick up both of these good kits from Revell in one box. Revell are also donating 1 Euro from each sale to the DGzRS. Recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  3. Search & Rescue Vessel Hermann Marwede Revell 1:72 The Hermann Marwede is the largest rescue vessel operated by the German Society For Sea Rescue or Die Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) to give them their correct German title. Like many such organisations of its type the DGzRS receive no government funding but rely on voluntary contributions to finance the organisation. The DGzRS was founded in 1865 by uniting many smaller organisations, and now celebrates its 150th Anniversary. It is interesting to note that during WWII they operated under the Red Cross and upheld their principles of rescuing anyone in distress. They have know grown into an organisation with 60 lifesaving vessels in 54 stations on the German Coastline. It is estimated over 82000 people have been saved by the organisation since its founding. Please visit the DGzRS website if you wish to read more about the organisation. The vessel was built by Fassmer in Berne and launched in 2003. She is 46m Long with a beam of 10.66m, a top speed of 25 Knots; with power being provided by three 9250 Shaft hp diesel engines each driving it's own shaft. The unrefuelled range is nearly 4000 Kms. The vessel features a fully equipped hospital unit, helicopter landing pad, fire-fighting water canons, and a stern launched rescue boat. The Hermann Marwded is stationed on the island of Helgoland. The vessel is named after Hermann Marwede a co-founder of the Becks Brewery (very apt for sailors), he was a past president of the DGzRS. Construction of the vessel was in the main funded by donations from the Marwede family. The Kit The first thing you notice about the kit is the sheer size of the box. It has to be this big to contain all of the plastic! Filling one side is a single piece hull, a further 8 sprues of white plastic, and one clear sprue. Construction starts inside the main hull with the fitting of the two bow thruster units. These each have their individual propellers fitted before the units are mounted to the hull. Then on the outside of the hull the three shafts, their propellers and individual rudders are fitted. The bow anchor is also fitted at this time. Once the outside of the main hull is finished it can be mounted on the supplied stands to aid the rest of the construction. The forward hull sides along with the forward railings are then fitted. Life-rafts are fitted to the rear bulkhead of the main deck. The main deck forward and aft is added into the hull at this stage, along with the stern bulkhead of the vessel. The instructions have the modeller adding the hull fenders at this stage. Though as these are a different colour to the main hull they are perhaps best left until last? Once the decks are in place construction moves to the aft main deck, and in particular the launching ramp for the fast rescue craft with work being done in this area to construct where the rescue craft will sit. The main deck railings are the next to be added, with smaller sections on the stern of the vessel. Once the railings are fitted a whole host of deck fittings need to be added on. Winches, bollards, deck hatches, life rafts, and an anchor windlass are all to be fitted. Next on the construction agenda is the upper deck house. This is assembled along with the ladders and railings which lead down to the main deck. A main towing winch is assembled and added behind the main deck superstructure. More railings and deck fittings are added at the deck house level. Next the pilot house / bridge deck level is added. Even though there is glazing all around this there is no interior at all provided. In this scale I would suggest this something Revell missed. Once this section is complete the deck mounted crane can be assembled. The next major area for construction (and the last) is the deck house / helicopter landing pad which is built over the fast rescue boat launching area. The plastic does a good job of simulating the steel texture of this area, though some sort of photo-etch would have been much better. The area also has its railings and ladders added at this time. Moving back to the main structure three fire-fighting cannons are assembled and installed behind the bridge. Three search light units are assembled and added to the forward top of the bridge. Then a whole host of aerials, antenna, and other items are added to the bridge roof. The last item to be added in this area is the mast arrangement. This also carries a wide range of radar antenna, navigation lights, and other aerials which all need to be added. The completed mast can then be installed onto the vessel. The last items for construction is the fast rescue craft, and the stern door which opens to allow it to be launched. In this scale the fast rescue boat is a kit in its own right. The main hull is split into upper and lower sections. Once these are together the deck house is built up on top of the boat. A full interior control section is supplied as this can be seen from the partially open rear area and rear mesh screen. Again the plastic here gives a good impression in this scale but a touch of PE would go a long way. Once the launch is completed it can be mounted in the vessel or used separately in a diorama setting. Decals The decal sheet is fairly small considering the size of the kit. The decals in this case are printed in Portugal instead of the usual Italian decals. I am not sure who printed these but the don't seem as sharp as the usual Revell fare. Conclusion This kit will build up to a large and imposing model in any collection. It is also a suitable kit for conversion to radio control if wanted. While the plastic gives a good impression in this scale the kit would benefit from photo etch in a lot of areas. Overall Recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit
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