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  1. Now that I finished my build for the Fw 190 group build, I thought it'd be time to start the single remaining kit in my stash, Revell's 1:32 Bf 109G-10 Erla. Colour scheme will be of Yellow 7 from JG300 at the end of the war in Europe. I'll be following Eduard's painting instructions for this aircraft. Boxart: Eduard's painting instructions. Photo of the real aircraft. Cockpit and propeller done. I managed to break the clear fuel pipe that goes into the cockpit, but that was fixed with a but of glue. More progress tomorrow!
  2. "Oh, the excitement, yet another Bf 109 build" I can almost hear you think. Admittedly, it is not the most original subject to depict but I've always had a soft spot for the Bf 109. I will be building two 1/72 kits, Airfix's Bf 109E-4 and Eduard's Bf 109E-3. The Airfix kit will represent White 7 of 3/6 orlyak the Royal Bulgarian Air Force circa Summer 1942 using decals from Kora's Bulgarian Eagles Part II. This is intended as a gift for a close childhood friend of mine who's late grandfather had passed him a 1/72 scale Emil that was given by German soldier who server in Bulgaria during the Second World War. Unfortunately, he lost it some years back during one of those hectic moves when the family increases and I know he cherished it as a family memento. I was hoping to complete the kit for his birthday next week but given my glacial building pace, there's no chance of that. I built another of Airfix's 1/72 Emils back in 2021, as White 6 of 3/6 orlyak, so am I know what to expect and, hopefully, what mistakes not to repeat. This will be displayed with the canopy closed so there won't be any super detailing effort inside but I am tempted to try to add riveting. Airfix's plastic is very soft, though, so might not work out. The second kit is Eduard's new Profipack boxing of the Special Hobby plastics. I've read superlatives about the Special Hobby 109Es but they seem to be quite complex kits that require some planning and precision to assemble properly. I am really tempted to try and build it in such a way to allow removing the engine and machine gun block top covers. Still undecided on what marking option to choose but it will be a Luftwaffe bird. This will also be the first time I will be using Eduard decals and if I understand correctly from my research, Eduard's decal transfer film can be removed once they dry so only the pigment remains? Here's my start off point. As I mentioned above, I am going to be working at a glacial pace. Unfortunately, things have been hectic on the personal front ever since the pandemic began and this is an attempt to start hobby project that I can focus on, and to break a habit of not asking for help or advice when needed. Well, off we go!
  3. 1/48 Avia S-199 (post war Bf 109) is planed for next two or three years. source: http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=4005#p1897662 downscale to 1/72 is planed too (like all Eduard projects) but more years in future.
  4. Finished this kit yesterday. The model came with bonus resin tyres from Hasegawa, which also came with the regular plastic ones. I used Revell Aqua colours and several brushes to complete this aircraft. The original kit decals were completely unsuable, cracked beyond redemption. Luckily I was able to count from my spares box to complete this paint job.
  5. I'd like to start a 1/48th Zvezda Bf109F. When I built Hasegawa G variants before, the instruction indicated modellers to scribe a panel line on upper wing as below: For F variants, this panel line is not required. However, Zvezda's "F" has this line. I checked my reference, there is not such a detail on Kagero Topdrawing and Aero Details for "F", but on Valiant Wings publishing, both "F" and "G" share this line. So, should I fill and sand? I tried to check hhotos of actual aircrafts but could not confirm it. Is it a modification on later variants (G~K) ?
  6. The Messerschmitt Bf 109 continued to soldier on after the war in a number of places, including Eastern Europe, Czechoslovakia, Spain and Finland. Four of them were painted in high visibility markings for a race at an airshow. Since the spectators were in the center of the track and only saw one side of there planes, only the port side was painted. This is the superb Tamiya kit, riveted, with additional details. These include a Rob Taurus vac canopy with added details, riveting the entire airframe, tall tailwheel strut from a Fine Molds 109 G-10, brake lines, etc. I have to say, this one was a lot of fun. Not sure if there was ever a more garish 109, well maybe the Swiss one with the huge shark mouth (hint), but this one will stand out on the shelf. I had to resort to the iPhone 11 for these photos. The old digital camera is giving up the ghost. It will no longer focus properly and the shots lack definition. The phone camera has a level of vibrancy that was never there with my digital camera, but depth of field suffers. Does anyone have a camera recommendation? Anyway, on to the photos. I apologize; there are a lot of them. Got carried away with the phone.. IMG_7438 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7436 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7439 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7440 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7441 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7443 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7445 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7444 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7448 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr IMG_7447 by Barry Numerick, on Flickr
  7. Messerschmitt Bf 109E-1 "JG.77" (AZ7805) 1:72 AZ Model Kits The BF 109 has inherited quite a legendary status and when you look into its service career, it's certainly obvious why. Viewing the design in retrospect, it looks just like a typical fighter of the WWII era, but it was more than that, it was the very platform that the single seat fighter format was born from. Powerful engine, monocoque airframe, all metal construction, enclosed cockpit and retractable gear this was unheard of before hand, it was radical, not typical in the 1930's. Its birth wasn't perfect however, to achieve its performance, some sacrifices were made, particularly in the landing gear arrangement and high wing loading having a negative effect on landing speeds compared to the competition at the time. This inherent design issue was never fully cured and it's estimated that at least 10% of all 109's were lost in take off accidents. Early models (A-D) were powered by the Junkers jumo engine with outputs of around 700hp. The aircraft was first used in combat during the Spanish Civil War where many lessons were learned and these would be later put to good use in battles over France and Britain. The E or Emil model broke the mould in 109 development by changing to the more powerful Daimler Benz DB 601 engine of around 1080hp, a significant step in performance and also in armament due to the introduction of 20mm cannon. By 1939, all earlier variants had been replaced in frontline service. As the variants progressed, so did the level of armour protection for the pilot. Another critical element to improve survivability was the use of twin radiators with cut off valves meaning that if one radiator was damaged, the other could be used to keep it airborne. The Emil was the primary Luftwaffe fighter until 1941 when the F model became widely available with more powerful engine although a few managed to see combat in the Battle of Britain. For an aircraft that broke the mould with fighter technology and performance in the mid 30's, it's evolution meant that whilst it's design had exhausted improvement capability towards the end of the war, it stayed in operational use until 1965 in Europe in the guise of the Spanish licence built HA 1112 using the Merlin power plant. During its 30 year career, more than 33,000 were built, a record that will probably never be beaten. The Kit This is a new decal issues, for their brand new tool kits from 2020 from. The quality is first class with crisp moulding and fine engraved panel lines. Given the small size of the real aircraft, in 1/72 the model is quite diminutive, but seems well detailed. There are many parts on the sprue including a full set of wings, different wheels, and different spinners so no doubt other marks can be built from the box, and either way the modeller will have lots of spare parts. Construction starts with the cockpit. The floor and rear bulkhead are moulded as one. The seat is added alongside the control column with belts being provided as decals. The front bulkhead with the instrument panel goes in, here the instruments are provided as decal. The prop is constructed next with different spinners for the E and E-1. The cockpit then goes into the right fuselage. Up front there is no engine but a lower plate for the radiator and a pair of exhausts. Once these are in the fuselage can be closed up. Now we move to the wings with the radiators being fitted in before the wings are assembled. There is a single lower wing with split left and right uppers. Once assembled this can added to the fuselage. The main landing gear is ten assembled and added, followed by the tail wheel. Moving back to the top of the aircraft the front engine cover/gun area can be added along with the pilots head armour. The prop can be fitted along with the engine intake and the canopy. On the underside a carrier for a bomb, or different carrier for a fuel tank can be added as needed. The last items to be added are the tail planes along with their supporting struts. Markings The glossy decal sheet is printed in house and looks sharp and in register. There are three decal options available from the decal sheet, all from JG.77 (no surprise there) Conclusion It is good to see a new tool out of this most famous aircraft. I am no 109 expert but it looks to be a well detailed and engineered kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Messerschmitt Bf 109E-7 Trop "Braving Sand & Snow" (SH72462) 1:72 Special Hobby The BF 109 has inherited quite a legendary status and when you look into its service career, it's certainly obvious why. Viewing the design in retrospect, it looks just like a typical fighter of the WWII era, but it was more than that, it was the very platform that the single seat fighter format was born from. Powerful engine, monocoque airframe, all metal construction, enclosed cockpit and retractable gear this was unheard of before hand, it was radical, not typical in the 1930's. Its birth wasn't perfect however, to achieve its performance, some sacrifices were made, particularly in the landing gear arrangement and high wing loading having a negative effect on landing speeds compared to the competition at the time. This inherent design issue was never fully cured and it's estimated that at least 10% of all 109's were lost in take off accidents. Early models (A-D) were powered by the Junkers jumo engine with outputs of around 700hp. The aircraft was first used in combat during the Spanish Civil War where many lessons were learned and these would be later put to good use in battles over France and Britain. The E or Emil model broke the mould in 109 development by changing to the more powerful Daimler Benz DB 601 engine of around 1080hp, a significant step in performance and also in armament due to the introduction of 20mm cannon. By 1939, all earlier variants had been replaced in frontline service. As the variants progressed, so did the level of armour protection for the pilot. Another critical element to improve survivability was the use of twin radiators with cut off valves meaning that if one radiator was damaged, the other could be used to keep it airborne. The Emil was the primary Luftwaffe fighter until 1941 when the F model became widely available with more powerful engine although a few managed to see combat in the Battle of Britain. For an aircraft that broke the mould with fighter technology and performance in the mid 30's, it's evolution meant that whilst it's design had exhausted improvement capability towards the end of the war, it stayed in operational use until 1965 in Europe in the guise of the Spanish licence built HA 1112 using the Merlin power plant. During its 30 year career, more than 33,000 were built, a record that will probably never be beaten. The Kit This is a brand new tool for 2020 from Special Hobby, in collaboration with Eduard. The quality is first class with crisp moulding and fine engraved panel lines. Given the small size of the real aircraft, in 1/72 the model is quite diminutive, but seems well detailed. Construction starts with the cockpit. The rear bulkhead attaches to the floor with the rudder pedals going in as well. The front lower bulkhead is made up and installed onto the floor followed by the instruments panel and the coaming in front of it. The instruments being provided as decals. Into the cockpit go the flight controls and flap wheel, followed by the seat. The belts being provided as decals also. If the modeller is going to display the cover for the guns in front of the cockpit open then full guns are included, if you are doing this closed then only partial ones need to be added. Next up the engine is assembled which seems quite detailed for the scale, the bearers attached and it fitted to the firewall. Inside the main fuselage halves the exhausts are fitted along with the tail wheel and then the whole thing can be closed up. Separate engine and gun covers can be added, or left off as needed. For the tropical version the longer filter is added to the intake. After the tail surfaces are attached to the main fuselage then we can move onto the wings. The lower wing is a single part with left and right uppers. The wheel wells are all boxed in on the lower. To the middle of the lower wing the radiator is first added. The top wings can then go on. All the wing control surfaces are separate parts. To finish the wing the under wing radiators are added. The wing can then be joined with the fuselage. The canopy parts can then be added, along with the head armour. The slats can then be added to the main wing in either the open or closed position as needed. At the front the prop and spinner goes on. Last up for the main parts, the main landing gear is made up and added. A few detail parts now can be added to finish of the kit, the aerial mast, pitot tubes, balance horns,; and even an engine starting handle if you wish to install it. Markings The glossy decal sheet is printed in house and looks sharp and in register. There are four decal options available from the decal sheet; W.Nr 6389. White 9 1.(J)/LG2, pilot Oberleutnant Erwin ‘Ceasar’ Clausen, Mariupol, Germany-occupied Ukraine, the Soviet Union, December 1941 chevron/A, Stabschwarm I./JG 27, pilot grupenadjuntant Oblt. Ludwig Franzisket, April 1941. After being transferred to North Africa, Franzisket's machine still remained in its original scheme of RLM02/71. White 10, I./JG27, pilot Fw. Günther Steinhausen, Ain-el-Gazala, Libya, August 1941 W.Nr.4964, S9+DR, 7./ZG1, El Alamein, Libya, August 1942. The starboard side wing was a replacement still bearing European camouflage colours. Conclusion It is good to see a new tool out of this most famous aircraft. I am no 109 expert but it looks to be a well detailed and engineered kit. Highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  9. Hello guys, here are the photos of my most recently completed model, Revell's 1:32 Bf 109G-6 in 1:32. The kit used was the 1:32, 2014 tooling, Revell Bf 109G-6 Late/Early. So far, this my third boxing of the Revell 109G I've built. Parts had some flash, especially in the exhaust area and the armoured headrest. The aircraft shown is the Bf 109G-6 when Erich Hartmann was Kommandeur of I/JG53 in Veszprèm, Hungary, February 1945.
  10. Hello guys, After building the small Airfix Spitfire Mk.Ia in 72nd, I decided to go back to one of my favourite scales, 1:32. This time it's the turn for the Revell 1:32 Bf 109G-6. Markings will come from different sources: The heart with Ursula's name, so distinctive on each of Hartmann's aircraft, will be from the Academy 1:48 Ta 183. Lower wing crosses will be from the Hasegawa Bf 109G-6 (the ones with the black outline). The chevrons are from the kit decals. Tulips and yellow markings will have to be painted. Real life photo of the aircraft: Here are the first in-progress photos: Propeller done:
  11. The story so far: In order to keep it as at least a neutral country, the Third Reich offered Argentina a batch of 10 brand new Bf 109F-4s. These aircraft were numbered from I-101 to I-110. In order to improve the aircraft's performance, the Argentinian Air Force asked Messerschmitt to leave the 109s in bare metal, the only areas receiving some sort of "camouflage" being the fabric covered control surfaces. The Argentinian flag was painted in the rudder. The 10 aircraft were then given to the newly created Grupo 5 de Caza (5th Fighter Group) based at the Moròn Air Base in Buenos Aires. After the war, the ten 109s were scrapped. No remains were left. Footnote: This is a what if story, don't do as the Argentinian modellers did by believing it. Grupo 5 de Caza was also based at Villa Reynolds (San Luís, Argentina), and was established in 1966. They used the A-4 Skyhawks. I was inspired to make this what if after seeing a profile of an Fw 190A-4 in bare metal and with Argentinian colours. The kit chosen for this was the Weekend Edition of the Eduard 1:48 Bf 109F-4. Some fit issues, the instrument panel had to be trimmed so the fuselage halves could close properly. And the forward parts of the wheelwells needed to be sanded down so the upper wings could mate with the lower wings. Decals came from my spares box.
  12. Had Argentina officially sided with the Axis during 1942/43, which aircraft would the FAA had used: Bf 109F-4 or Fw 190A-2 (1942)/Fw 190A-5 (1943). Don't want a political discussion in the comments, just want to know which aircraft could have been used by Argentina.
  13. Messerschmitt Bf 109E-1 J/88 Legion Condor (SH72443) 1:72 Special Hobby The BF 109 has inherited quite a legendary status and when you look into its service career, it's certainly obvious why. Viewing the design in retrospect, it looks just like a typical fighter of the WWII era, but it was more than that, it was the very platform that the single seat fighter format was born from. Powerful engine, monocoque airframe, all metal construction, enclosed cockpit and retractable gear this was unheard of before hand, it was radical, not typical in the 1930's. Its birth wasn't perfect however, to achieve its performance, some sacrifices were made, particularly in the landing gear arrangement and high wing loading having a negative effect on landing speeds compared to the competition at the time. This inherent design issue was never fully cured and it's estimated that at least 10% of all 109's were lost in take off accidents. Early models (A-D) were powered by the Junkers jumo engine with outputs of around 700hp. The aircraft was first used in combat during the Spanish Civil War where many lessons were learned and these would be later put to good use in battles over France and Britain. The E or Emil model broke the mould in 109 development by changing to the more powerful Daimler Benz DB 601 engine of around 1080hp, a significant step in performance and also in armament due to the introduction of 20mm cannon. By 1939, all earlier variants had been replaced in frontline service. As the variants progressed, so did the level of armour protection for the pilot. Another critical element to improve survivability was the use of twin radiators with cut off valves meaning that if one radiator was damaged, the other could be used to keep it airborne. The Emil was the primary Luftwaffe fighter until 1941 when the F model became widely available with more powerful engine although a few managed to see combat in the Battle of Britain. For an aircraft that broke the mould with fighter technology and performance in the mid 30's, it's evolution meant that whilst it's design had exhausted improvement capability towards the end of the war, it stayed in operational use until 1965 in Europe in the guise of the Spanish licence built HA 1112 using the Merlin power plant. During its 30 year career, more than 33,000 were built, a record that will probably never be beaten. The Kit This is a brand new tool for 2020 from Special Hobby, in collaboration with Eduard. The quality is first class with crisp moulding and fine engraved panel lines. Given the small size of the real aircraft, in 1/72 the model is quite diminutive, but seems well detailed. Construction starts with the cockpit. The rear bulkhead attaches to the floor with the rudder pedals going in as well. The front lower bulkhead is made up and installed onto the floor followed by the instruments panel and the coaming in front of it. The instruments being provided as decals. Into the cockpit go the flight controls and flap wheel, followed by the seat. The belts being provided as decals also. If the modeller is going to display the cover for the guns in front of the cockpit open then full guns are included, if you are doing this closed then only partial ones need to be added. Next up the engine is assembled which seems quite detailed for the scale, the bearers attached and it fitted to the firewall. Inside the main fuselage halves the exhausts are fitted along with the tail wheel and then the whole thing can be closed up. Separate engine and gun covers can be added, or left off as needed. After the tail surfaces are attached to the main fuselage then we can move onto the wings. The lower wing is a single part with left and right uppers. The wheel wells are all boxed in on the lower. To the middle of the lower wing the radiator is first added. The top wings can then go on. All the wing control surfaces are separate parts. To finish the wing the under wing radiators are added. The wing can then be joined with the fuselage. The canopy parts can then be added, with different types of head armour being provided for the different decal options. The slats can then be added to the main wing in either the open or closed position as needed. At the front the prop and spinner goes on. Last up for the main parts, the main landing gear is made up and added. A few detail parts now can be added to finish of the kit, the aerial mast, pitot tubes, balance horns,; and even an engine starting handle if you wish to install it. Markings The glossy decal sheet is printed in house and looks sharp and in register. There are three decal options available from the decal sheet; 6-123 - J/88 Legion Condor. Olbt Hans Schmoller-Haldy, Spain 1939 6-121 - J/88 Legion Condor, Lt Karl-Wolfgang Radish, Spain 1938/39 6-119 - J.88 Legion Condor, Hptm Siebelt Reents, Spain 1938/39 Conclusion It is good to see a new tool out of this most famous aircraft. I am no 109 expert but it looks to be a well detailed and engineered kit. Highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  14. I just finished these 11 models for the BF 109 Group build. Enjoy, Cheers Jes
  15. Hello guys, here are the photos of my most recent model, Revell's 109G-10 Erla in 32nd.
  16. Hello guys! I just received a notification from a domestic seller that my Bf 109G-10 Erla in 32nd scale from Revell is on its way to my local post office. The kit has markings for two versions: Erich Hartmann's last Messerschmitt, and Yellow 7. I'll be building it as Hartmann's machine and put it alongside his G-6 from Hasegawa. I learnt a lot from the G-6 Late & Early (from Revell too), and will apply my findings (such as loose landing gear struts and fragile tailwheel strut) into play with this model. I hope I don't slash the tailwheel strut with my hand this time. The model should be arriving next week if everything goes according to the delivery schedule. Until that, here's a downloaded photo from Google of the kit's boxart.
  17. Camouflage & Decals Messerschmitt Bf 109 A-F (9788366673212) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK The Messerschmitt Bf 109 is one of the iconic aircraft of WWII. It origins were from before WWII where it was first used in the Spanish Civil War by the German Air Force working on the side of the Spanish Fascists in what would prove to be training for WWII. The Bf 109 served through WWII going through many changes of the design including fighters and fighter bombers. The book is primarily colour profiles of the various different marks of the 109. There are 39 pages of profiles and a page listing model paints for the German RLM colours. These are listed in FS number, Humbrol, Gunze, Pactra, Aeromaster, Testors, Xtracolor and Lifecolor brands. As well as the Book there is an accompanying decal sheet. While the book contains the profiles there is no information accompanying the profiles as to the colours used on that aircraft. By Kagero's own admission in the preface the profiles used in the first 5 of these books have been previously published by them before. Future books will feature new material. Decals There is n the book a sheet of decals in both 1/72 & 1/48. The decals look well printed, glossy with minimal carrier film. I was surprised and disappointed to find out these only contained the national markings for Germany & Spain. I was expecting maybe a decal sheets to supply some of the markings to build a few of the aircraft in the profiles. As it is if you dont have these already in the spares box or decal stash then you will have to source these separately. Conclusion Sorry but a combination of recycled profiles along with a decal sheet only containing National Markings does not make me want to rush out for more of the same. Recommended only if you are a die hard 109 fan and must have this publication. I feel Kagero are riding on the coat tails of some excellent publications they have done in the past with this volume. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Messerschmitt Bf 109E-1 Emil (05-07) 1:48 Wingsy Kits The BF 109 has inherited quite a legendary status, and when you look into its service career, it's certainly obvious why. Viewing the design in retrospect, it looks just like a typical fighter of the WWII era, but it was more than that, it was the very platform that the single seat fighter format was born from. Powerful engine, monocoque airframe, all metal construction, enclosed cockpit and retractable gear this was unheard of before hand, it was radical, not typical in the 1930's. Its birth wasn't perfect however, to achieve its performance, some sacrifices were made, particularly in the landing gear arrangement and high wing loading having a negative effect on landing speeds compared to the competition at the time. This inherent design issue was never fully cured and it's estimated that at least 10% of all 109's were lost in take off accidents. Early models (A-D) were powered by the Junkers jumo engine with outputs of around 700hp. The aircraft was first used in combat during the Spanish Civil War where many lessons were learned and these would be later put to good use in battles over France and Britain. The E or Emil model broke the mould in 109 development by changing to the more powerful Daimler Benz DB 601 engine of around 1080hp, a significant step in performance and also in armament due to the introduction of the 20mm cannon. By 1939, all earlier variants had been replaced in frontline service. As the variants progressed, so did the level of armour protection for the pilot. Another critical element to improve survivability was the use of twin radiators with cut off valves meaning that if one radiator was damaged, the other could be used to keep it airborne. The Emil was the primary Luftwaffe fighter until 1941 when the F model became widely available with more powerful engine although a few managed to see combat in the Battle of Britain. For an aircraft that broke the mould with fighter technology and performance in the mid 30's, it's evolution meant that whilst it's design had exhausted improvement capability towards the end of the war, it stayed in operational use until 1965 in Europe in the guise of the Spanish licence built HA 1112 using the Merlin power plant. During its 30 year career, more than 33,000 were built, a record that will probably never be beaten. The Kit This is a brand new tool form Wingsy. It is a shorter run kit in that the production run is not as large as other companies and the sprues themselves are smaller, and there are not as many tiny parts as some kits. The qality of the moulding is first rate though, better in fact than some other 109s in my stash. Construction starts with the cockpit. The rudder pedals are built up and added to the cockpit floor, followed by the seat complete with PE belts. The trim wheels, control column and oxygen regulator are then fitted. The front bulkhead complete with oil tank is fitted. To both side panels detail parts are added. The instrument panel has the gunsight fitted. All instruments are provided as decals. The complete cockpit can now be assembled, Next up a few subassemblies of the propeller, prop boss and main landing gear are built up. The fuselage can then be closed up with the cockpit going between the two sides, the rear deck for the cockpit then going on, the rudder and tail wheel part fitting at the rear, and at the front an engine block, and the front top deck with the two machine guns behind it. At the front the boss for the prop is fitted. The last item to be added here is the engine air intake. We now move onto the wing. There is a single part lower wing, with left/right uppers. Before closing the wings up the wheel wells need to be built up. Once assembled the wing tips can be glued on. The wings can the be fitted along with the front under engine cowling and its oil cooler. The tailplanes are fitted at the rear, and the radiators are fitted to the wings. At the front the engine exhaust stubs are fitted to either side. All of the flying control surfaces are now added with the flaps, slats, ailerons and tail control surfaces being separate parts that the modeller can fit as they want. To finish off the wheels are put on their axles, along with the canopies (the pilots head armour being added from PE and plastic parts), aerials, pitot tubes and balance horns go on, they lastly at the front, the propeller. Markings The glossy decal sheet is printed by Decograf and looks sharp and in register. There are four decal options available from the decal sheet; Stab I./JG51 - Josef "Pips" Priller. Speyer, Germany 1939 WNr. 3356, I./JG51 Heinz "Pritzl" Priller Bar, Early Battle of France, 1939. II./JG26 Staffelkaptin Fritz Losigkeit Werl, Germany 1940. WNr 3413, 5./JG26 Lt Hans Krug, Marquise, France 1940. Conclusion It is good to see a new tool of this most famous aircraft, which should do well for Wingsy. I'm not a 109 experten, but it looks to be a well detailed and engineered kit. Highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  19. While I wait for the decals for my Ju 88C-6b from ICM to arrive (I haven't even cut plastic), I've decided to buy and build this kit. I've been looking up and down for it, and finally got it at a good price. I'll be painting it as Franz Dörr's Bf 109G-6 Late. This aircraft was stationed at Gossen in Norway until the end of WW2 in Europe in May 1945. As it's a common thing with Revell Germany models, the kit doesn't come with Swastikas, so I may have to source them from somewhere else (if I decide to put them when the decalling starts). Speaking of decals, they're printed "in Italy for Revell," so I assume that's Cartograf. I'll begin the kit tomorrow after coming back home from my Covid vaccination trip.
  20. Messerschmitt Bf 109E-3 (SH72443) 1:72 Special Hobby The BF 109 has inherited quite a legendary status and when you look into its service career, it's certainly obvious why. Viewing the design in retrospect, it looks just like a typical fighter of the WWII era, but it was more than that, it was the very platform that the single seat fighter format was born from. Powerful engine, monocoque airframe, all metal construction, enclosed cockpit and retractable gear this was unheard of before hand, it was radical, not typical in the 1930's. Its birth wasn't perfect however, to achieve its performance, some sacrifices were made, particularly in the landing gear arrangement and high wing loading having a negative effect on landing speeds compared to the competition at the time. This inherent design issue was never fully cured and it's estimated that at least 10% of all 109's were lost in take off accidents. Early models (A-D) were powered by the Junkers jumo engine with outputs of around 700hp. The aircraft was first used in combat during the Spanish Civil War where many lessons were learned and these would be later put to good use in battles over France and Britain. The E or Emil model broke the mould in 109 development by changing to the more powerful Daimler Benz DB 601 engine of around 1080hp, a significant step in performance and also in armament due to the introduction of 20mm cannon. By 1939, all earlier variants had been replaced in frontline service. As the variants progressed, so did the level of armour protection for the pilot. Another critical element to improve survivability was the use of twin radiators with cut off valves meaning that if one radiator was damaged, the other could be used to keep it airborne. The Emil was the primary Luftwaffe fighter until 1941 when the F model became widely available with more powerful engine although a few managed to see combat in the Battle of Britain. For an aircraft that broke the mould with fighter technology and performance in the mid 30's, it's evolution meant that whilst it's design had exhausted improvement capability towards the end of the war, it stayed in operational use until 1965 in Europe in the guise of the Spanish licence built HA 1112 using the Merlin power plant. During its 30 year career, more than 33,000 were built, a record that will probably never be beaten. The Kit This is a brand new tool for 2020 from Special Hobby, in collaboration with Eduard. The quality is first class with crisp moulding and fine engraved panel lines. Given the small size of the real aircraft, in 1/72 the model is quite diminutive, but seems well detailed. Construction starts with the cockpit. The rear bulkhead attaches to the floor with the rudder pedals going in as well. The front lower bulkhead is made up and installed onto the floor followed by the instruments panel and the coaming in front of it. The instruments being provided as decals. Into the cockpit go the flight controls and flap wheel, followed by the seat. The belts being provided as decals also. If the modeller is going to display the cover for the guns in front of the cockpit open then full guns are included, if you are doing this closed then only partial ones need to be added. Next up the engine is assembled which seems quite detailed for the scale, the bearers attached and it fitted to the firewall. Inside the main fuselage halves the exhausts are fitted along with the tail wheel and then the whole thing can be closed up. Separate engine and gun covers can be added, or left off as needed. After the tail surfaces are attached to the main fuselage then we can move onto the wings. The lower wing is a single part with left and right uppers. The wheel wells are all boxed in on the lower. To the middle of the lower wing the radiator is first added. The top wings can then go on. All the wing control surfaces are separate parts. To finish the wing the under wing radiators are added. The wing can then be joined with the fuselage. The canopy parts can then be added, with different types of head armour being provided for the different decal options. The slats can then be added to the main wing in either the open or closed position as needed. At the front the prop and spinner goes on. Last up for the main parts, the main landing gear is made up and added. A few detail parts now can be added to finish of the kit, the aerial mast, pitot tubes, balance horns,; and even an engine starting handle if you wish to install it. Markings The glossy decal sheet is printed in house and looks sharp and in register. There are four decal options available from the decal sheet; Grupenkommander Werner Molders, III./JG53 France June 1940 Yellow 15, Uffz Karl Wolff 2./JG52 France August 1940 Yellow 1, Staffelkaptain Oblt Joesf Priller 6./JG51 France July-Oct 1940 Black 4, Ofw Anton Hackl, 5./JG77 Norway Summer 1940 White 13, Heinz Bar, 1./JG51 France Summer 1940 Masks Special Hobby also do masks for the kit. The masks are for the canopies and wheels. Conclusion It is good to see a new tool out of this most famous aircraft. I am no 109 expert but it looks to be a well detailed and engineered kit. Highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
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