Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Atlantic Models'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Forum Functionality & Forum Software Help and Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modeling using 3D Printing
    • 3D Printing Basics
    • 3D Printing Chat
    • 3D Makerspace
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • Amarket Modl
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • EBMA Hobby & Craft
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • fantasy Printshop
    • HMH Publications
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • MikroMir
    • Kingkit
    • Model Designs
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Paulus Victor Decals
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scalectronics - Lighting & Sound Solutions
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Starling Models
    • Test Valley Models
    • The48ers
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

  1. Well calling this one done it has not turned out as I had planned some mistakes crept in as I lost my inspiration of late. The thought of no shows to display for another year and the loss of some old work mates that had not been retired that long so it has got me thinking of other things and my mind has not been to focused on building models. Maybe I need a break work, eat, sleep repeat is not good for anyone . But did get some good news today for a change our local model club can start up 20th May with limited numbers so something to look forward to. Anyway enough of my mooning on I present my take on this kit I have seen some delightful versions done lately and a BIG thank you to Michal @socjo1 for the mountain of reference he shared with me and the effort he and others have put in trying to keep me on the straight and narrow. WIP below link https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235086089-hms-portchester-castle/ Name it name plate to the rescue again
  2. Finally got my hands on a 1/350 HMS Brave which I've been wanting since I got back in to modelling. This project is another of personal significance as my Dad was posted to Brave when I was born and I was the first person christened on the ship. Life at the minute means this one is probably going to sit on the shelf for a little while longer, but I'm so excited to have my return to modelling lined up after a bit of a hiatus starting a business.
  3. With the 8 month long build of County Class Cruisers coming to an end, it's time to move on. HMS Griffin - H31 will be the next, using the Atlantic models HMS Glowworm as base kit. HMS Griffin was one of 8 "G" Class destroyers, the most famous of which is HMS Glowworm due to it's fatal David and Goliath encounter with Admiral Hipper. Griffin was launched in 1935 and took part in the Norwegiain campaign early in the war before being transfered to the Mediterranean. She was transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in early 1943 and renamed HMCS Ottowa, seeing action at D-day and surviviing the war only to be scrapped in 1946. The G-Class was similar to the D and E classes before and the H and I classes that came after. Here are some pre war pictures that highlight her graceful lines She'll be portrayed in a paint scheme that she wore in lat3 1939/early 1940. There's a profile in Raven's "Warship Perspectives - Camouflage volume One". I've not been able to corroborate this profile with any wartime photographs. I have presumed that the colours are 507C and 507A (darker). There are pictures of her sister ships Garland and Grenade for a similar time period that closley resemble the type of scheme and this rather simple 2 colour scheme was common at early war. If anyone does have pictures - I'd be delighted to see them. Raven mentions that HMS Garland wore a visual IFF symbol on her foredeck consisting of a Type C1 RAF-type roundel. He postulates that others may have worn similar and this is a conceit that I'll use - Griffin will have a C1 roundel. It will add visual interest References will include the aforementioned book , my favourite of the whole series and the hardest to currently come by. I do hope that Dick @dickrd and @Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies will have a go at a more up to date publiction at some stage to highlight their wealth of research and re-interpretation of many wartime colour schemes. So let's examine the kit first which comes as HMS Glowworm. I'm not aware of any major structural differences between the 2 vessels. Glowworm comes with Pentad torpedo tubes which she alone trialled. Micromaster supply quad tubes. It's my first Resin kit and my first Atlantic models offering. The moulding is top notch and the hull comes as either water-line or full-hull - your choice. I'm going for waterline and like Berwick - she'll be at anchor There'll be a Micromaster 45ft launch alongside for visual interest - Thanks to Tom and Richard E for pointing me the way of steam tug Simla which is tempting but I feel will detract from the overall impact of Griffin. Those of you who are familiar with Peter Hall kits will appreciate the style of line drawn instructions and comprehensive Photoetch.... The superstructure parts are resiin and the smaller detailed parts - white metal Micromaster will have a big look-in including with more detailed replacement 4.7in guns Pennant numbers will come from the Atlantic models decal sheet And I obtained an Xtradecal sheet of C1 roundels - the only one that does a "C1" roundel that small. Sadly the C1 roundels are significantly out of register. I've ordered another sheet to see if it's replicated and if it is I'll have to think of an alternative There are some immediate problems apparent with simple dry- fitting - the Micromaster turrets impact the superstructure overhang........ And the first order of business will be to shave and remove the bulwarks on the superstructure as they appear on the bridge part - the reason being that the superstructure spans across several generic destroyer classes I don't expect any other major problems. If anyone has any serious qualms about the (unsubstantiated ) colour scheme or the IFF roundel, now's the time to shout! Thanks for looking Rob
  4. Modern Royal Navy Ship Decals Atlantic Models 1:600 (ATDec13) Modern / Cold War RN ships dont carry that many markings but they are there in form of Pennant numbers and other markings. Upgrade Set This small sheets provides markings for Royal Navy Pennant Numbers and Deck Markings in 1/600 scale. These are Modern style Pennant Numbers, Flight Deck Markings and Warning circles in Red and Yellow for the Airfix 1/600 scale range of ship kits, including HMS Amazon, HMS Leander, HMS Daring, HMS Devonshire, HMS Tiger and HMS Fearless etc. Conclusion Its good to see set being produced for replacement, or additional decal needs for the older 1:600 scale kits. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  5. HMS Victorious Detail Set + Airwing Set Atlantic Models 1:600 (ATEM60016 + 60017) HMS Victorious certainly had an interesting history. She was built as the third Illustrious class carrier being laid down in 1937 and launched in 1939 her commissioning was delayed until 1941 as there was greater demand at the time for escort vessels. She took part in actions against the Bismarck and several Artic convoys before taking part in getting supplies to Malta and operation Torch. Following US Naval losses she was loaned to the US Navy until returning for a refit in December 1943. During further convoy duties she took part in no less than 4 attacks on the Tirpitz in Norway. In June 1944 in the company of HMS Indomitable she sailed to join the Eastern Fleet for operations against Japan. She returned from Australia in late 1945, but undertook 3 more trips back to collect returning servicemen. After a short period in reserve she was deployed to the home fleet until sent for refit. This refit from 1950 to 1958 this was probably one of the most extensive refits undertaken as it encompassed new carrier technologies coming in, and in effect created an all new ship. Her hull was widened, deepened, and lengthened; her machinery was replaced with Foster-Wheeler boilers; her hangar height was increased; new armament of 3 inch (76 mm) guns was installed; a fully angled flight deck of 8 degrees and steam catapults were added. Her radar equipment was extensively altered to include up to date equipment, and included the first type 984 3-D radar system to be installed on a ship. Due t a decision halfway through to replace the steam turbines the flight deck was actually replaced twice! She was designed to serve until 1970, however a small fire during a 1967 provided a political excuse to decommission the ship early. The ship served from WWII through operations in Kuwait and Indonesia in the 1960;s and carried all naval aircraft fro the Fulmar to Buccaneer. A truly remarkable history in which she even played the part of HMS Ark Royal in the the 1960s film "Sink the Bismarck". Upgrade Set This A5 sheet of PE from Atlantic Models gives a fairly comprehensive upgrade set for her post refit fit. It is designed for the Airfix kit, this has been re-released over the years and some of the details are starting to become a bit soft. One of the main features is a complete set of railings for different parts of the ship. new forward catwalk assemblies port angled deck extensions, and catwalk life raft pack assemblies. For the 1960s fit there is the Alaskan Highway deck extension & Island modifications. Towards the rear there are the internal weather deck assemblies, and the aft boat deck railings as well. For the AA fit there is the large sextuplet 40mm bofors mounting and platform. The 3" twin turrets get their radar mountings replaced and there is a new deck crane. The starboard forward antenna assembly is also replaced. The funnel gets a new cap and the platform is included for the later platform. Moving to the island there is a new aft antenna platform. The railings are all replaced as are the platforms including the DF antenna platform. There is a new landing mirror system. Detailed plans show where all the island modifications take place. The main lattice mast is replaced along with all its platforms and yardarms. New platforms are provided alongside the flight deck for the whip antennas, the modeller will need to supply their own wire for the actual antennas. Air Wing Set This approx 4" square sheet of PE from Atlantic Models gives a fairly comprehensive upgrade set for her air wing. There are 5 seats including the tails, tailplanes, landing gear and wing pylons for the Supermarine Scimitars. There are 7 seats including the tailplane, landing gear and pylons for the de Havilland Sea Vixens. There are 4 sets including tailplanes, landing gear and propellers for the Douglas Skyrainder AEW aircraft. There are Two sets for the Wessex Helicopters with a choice of folder or extended rotor blades, tailrotors, and the tail wheel. For the deck there are also 5 deck tractors, a deck crane, and the flightdeck crash barrier. Conclusion Its good to see set being produced for older kits which can still hold their own and can benefit from the extra detail. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  6. HMS Suffolk Detail Set Atlantic Models 1:600 (ATEM60015) HMS Suffolk was a Royal Navy County Class Heavy Cruiser. Laid down in 1926 and commissioned in 1928. Originally serving on the China Station she returned home in time for WWII where she served and was damaged during the Norwegian campaign. After repairs she was engaged in the fight against the Bismarck. after firing on the Bismarck she was able to track her on radar to vector in additional units, After the loos of the Hood and damage to the Prince of Wales Suffolk continued to track the Bismarck until her fuel situation dictated she break off. Following this she served with the home fleet until 1942. A refit followed where she lost X Turret to gain much needed AA Armament. After this she was sent to the Eastern Fleet, operating in the Indian Ocean until the end of the war. Following the surrender of Japan she was used to transport military and civilian personnel from Australia, and the Far East, back to the UK. On her return Suffolk underwent repairs at Chatham Dockyard between November 1945 and January 1946. On completion she sailed to Australia again, returning in April 1946. Her final voyage was to Singapore arriving there in May, and returning in July 1946. later that year she was placed in unmaintained reserve until 1948. With the post-war economic difficulties of Britain hitting hard the reserve fleet was quickly sold off, and Suffolk was decommissioned in March 1948. and scrapped later the same year. The Set This slightly smaller thanA5 sheet of PE from Atlantic Models gives a fairly comprehensive upgrade set for her wartime fit before the removal of X Turrett. It is designed for the Airfix kit, this has been re-released over the years and some of the details are starting to become a bit soft. One of the main features is a complete set of railings for the ship. After that there are two 8 barrelled and two quad 50 Cal guns for for AA defence. For the antennas & radars you get a 285 AA Radar Yagi antenna, a 279 radar antenna assembly, and a 284 gunnery radar unit to fit to the director. There are new access doors for the turrets, and new foot ropes for the main fore mast. Starting at the bow there are new ships anchors, then working our way back aft new supports for the bridge deck, and a new shelter deck house assembly below this. There are new deck fittings and railings for the shelter deck and new Pom Pom bulwarks. There are new funnel grills and siren platforms, toped of with a new funnel cap. New decks are provided for the ships boats. There are new lens caps for the searchlights, new foot ropes for the main mast, a new accommodation ladder and rear depth charge rails. New hatches and doors are provided. ne of the main areas to be addressed with this set is the ships aircraft. As well as parts for the Walrus itself, there is a new aircraft crane assembly, a new catapult, and new parts for the aircraft hanger including the doors, deck railings and additional fittings. Conclusion Its good to see set being produced for older kits which can still hold their own and can benefit from the extra detail. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  7. HMS Royal Sovereign "R" Class Battleship Detail Set Atlantic Models 1:500 (ATEM50008) The R Class were a class of5 ships designated superdreadnought battleships built for the Royal Navy from 1910. Only Revenge and Royal Oak were completed in time to see action in WWI. The ships were not modernised during the interwar years and at the start of WWII Royal Sovereign was assigned to the home fleet on convoy protection duties. While then assigned to the Eastern Fleet she was withdrawn to again escort convoys in East Africa. On here return to Britain in early 1944 she was transferred to the Soviet Navy, who renamed her Arkhangelsk. She then again escorted convoys in the Artic until the end of the war. The Soviets returned the ship in 1949, after inspection she was found to be in such poor condition (all the turrets were seized) that she was broken up for scrap. The Set This A5 sheet of PE from Atlantic Models gives a fairly comprehensive upgrade set for her wartime fit. It is designed for the Fog kit, this has been re-released over the years and some of the details are starting to become a bit soft. One of the main features is a complete set of railings for the ship. After that there are two 8 barrelled and two four barreled Pom Poms, plus eight 20mm single Oerlikons for AA defence. Platforms are provided for these guns where needed such as the one on B Turret. For the antennas & radars you get a 285 AA Radar Yagi antenna, a type 282 Radar Yagi Antenna, a 279 & 281 radar antenna assembly and a 284 gunnery radar unit to fit to the director. Starting at the bow you get new focsle deck fittings. There is a shield for B Turret. On the shelter deck there are splinter shields for the 4" turrets, and a new shape aft deck section. The fore mast gets extra details, platforms and supports, as well as a new DF antenna, as well as the main starfish assembly. The main mast gets platforms for the 20mm guns, and a new platform and main radar unit. There is a new deck house for behind the main mast. At the rear there are shields for X turret and the Sea Plane catapult which sat on top of X Turret. A crane for recovery of the sea plane is also included. Other areas of note are new decks for the ships boats as well as davits for them and carley raft racks. Conclusion Its good to see set being produced for older kits which can still hold their own and can benefit from the extra detail. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  8. Type 23 Frigate Sea Ceptor Upgrade Set Atlantic Models 1:350 (ATAC35022) The Sea Ceptor missile is a next-generation, ship-based, all-weather, air defence weapon system, it is the replacement in the Royal Navy for the Sea Wolf point Defence system. This was developed by MBDA under the Common Anti-Air Modular Missile (CAMM) series of missiles which included the ASRAAM missile. The Sea Ceptor is capable of defending against missile and air threats not only to the firing vessel but in a wider envelope. It is also claimed to have a limited capability against small surface targets. The system has been retro fitted to the Royal Navy's Type 23 Frigates and will be built into the new Type 26 Frigate. The Set This set from Atlantic Models is an upgrade to Trumpeters 1/350 Type 23 kit. The kit contains resin, white metal and photo etched parts. The white metal parts are also cast in resin so the modeller can choose which to use. The main resin part in the set is a new vertical launch cell on the foredeck. While on the front of the vessel a new Kryten turret is included. The set also provides a new Artisan Radar array for the main mast, with a PE mast head and platform combined with a new resin radar antenna. There is a new mast sensor assembly for the main mast. For the top of the bridge the Type 911 director is replaced with a new resin data link radome, one of these is also fitted to the top of the hanger requiring the the radar deflector fences to be removed. Als well as this another larger radome is also installed on the back of the hanger, and railings are provided for this area as well. On the quarter deck a new 1087 Towed sonar is included in the set. Two new 3D printed Atlantic 24 RHIBs are included to replace the older Atlantic 22s. For the funnel a new Radome and mounting platform is included. The last item in this updatre set is a new resin & PE Wildcat Helicopter to replace the Lynx. Conclusion Well, Atlantic Models have done it again, giving the modeller an option to produce the latest Type 23. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  9. 4.5" Barrels for Mk 8 Mod 0 and Mod1 Gun Turrets - Modern RN Atlantic Models 1:350 The 4.5" Gun has been used by the Royal Navy since 1938, the current 55 calibre model replaced the wartime 45 calibre model. It was designed in the 1960 to emphasis reliability and a quick response to the first round firing due to the perceived need to be used against incoming missiles. The gun was designed to be semi automatic needing no personnel in the gun mounting. The Mod 0 turret was upgraded in the late 1990s to one with complete electrical system as opposed to the previous electro hydraulic one, and most notably a reduced radar cross section which was quickly nicknamed the Kryten turret after a character in the popular TV Series Red Dwarf. The Gun has sop far been fitted to RN Type 21, Type 22, Type 23, Type 42 and Type 45 ships. It looks like this will be the end of the line for the Gun as the new Type 26 is to be fitted with the BAE 5-inch Mk 45 naval gun. Conclusion Well, Atlantic Models have done it again, giving the modeller an option of using the brass barrels. Highly recommended for your Modern RN build Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  10. HMS Cumberland Type 22 Frigate (Batch 3) Atlantic Models 1:350 I must admit straight off that I have a soft spot for the Type 22 Batch 3. I was present at the Launching of HMS Campbeltown, and worked on fitting her out as part of my apprenticeship. The Batch 3 Type 22 Frigate had developed a fair way from the original Broadsword Class first ordered in 1974. The Class were primarily designed as anti-submarine ships to protect convoys under the UK's commitment to NATO. The length at the time was dictated by the dimensions of the undercover Frigate Refit Complex at Devonport Dockyard. As well as sonar system they were fitted with torpedo tubes and would carry the Lynx Helicopter. Offensive armament was provided by 4 canister mounted Exocet missiles on the foredeck. The primary defensive armament was 2 sextuplet Sea Wolf missile systems. By the time the four Batch 3 vessels were ordered a more general class of ship was needed, it had been released by the RN that ships really still did need a Gun and the bow space again was taken by a 4.5" turret. The ships did not loose their missiles though as the 4 Exocets were replaced by eight Harpoon missiles on two quartet launchers mounted up behind the bridge. The defensive armament was enhanced by fitting a 30mm Goalkeeper CIWS. Extra accommodation space was also fitted in allowing the ships to host a flag officer and become command & control centres. Propulsion was obtained from 2 Rolls Royce Tyne Engines and 2 Rolls Royce Spey Engines, the Speys replacing earlier Olympus Engines. These gave the vessels a top speed in excess of 30 Knots and a better sea keeping ability. Names for the 4 batch 3 ships were a mixture, though all celebrating different parts of RN history. a mixture: Cornwall and Cumberland, revived County-class names previously carried both by First World War-era cruisers, and by Second World War-era County-class heavy cruisers. The other two Chatham and Campbeltown, were Town names, the former reviving a 1911 Town-class light cruiser name, and the latter commemorating HMS Campbeltown famous for the St Nazaire Raid in 1942; the name for HMS Chatham was also selected as a salute to the Medway town, where the Chatham Dockyard, established in 1570, had closed in 1984. While most of the earlier Type 22s were sold to overseas Navies all 4 Batch 3 Ships were scrapped well before the end of their projected service lives The Kit The kit comes in the standard sturdy Atlantic Models box filled with plenty of poly chips to protect the contents. The metal, and resin parts are contained in zip lock bags stapled to a piece of card. The upper and lower hull sections are further protected from damage, by being wrapped in bubble wrap. There is a long envelope found at the bottom of the box containing a large sheet of etched brass, whilst a separate zip lock bag contains the sheet of decals. When the impressive 42cm hull is unwrapped the first thing that strikes you is the cleanliness of the resin. It is really smooth, with no sign of deformation, bubbles, or other imperfections. The upper and lower hulls are joined together by several pips and holes, but I find that it’s easier to remove the pips and align everything by eye and by feel as they tend to leave a large gap whereas by removing them, the gap almost disappears and there is very little need to filling, just a light touch with a sanding stick. The rest of the resin parts are just as well moulded, although the large sections of the superstructure do appear to have small pips on their undersides that may need to be removed. As seen in the photos, some of the smaller parts have a fair bit of flash, but it’s very soft and easily removed. The white metal parts don’t have a lot of flash, but there are seams that will need removing, again, a fairly easy job. The large etch sheet is what we have come to expect from Atlantic Models, beautiful clean relief etching, great design and lots of parts, and is probably the area that makes these models more for the experienced modeller than even the resin. Before any construction can take place, make sure you clean all the parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any mould release agent that may be attached. Naturally for these kits, it’s sub assemblies first. This is mainly the main deck house The bridge goes on at the front with the foremast at the rear. In between these goes the forward Sea Wolf tracker and the Goalkeeper CIWS. Behind the main deck house sits the intake housing for the engine room and behind this the funnel. Between the funnel and the hanger goes the rear mast. Now these main parts are on its time to make up a whole host of smaller parts for mounting to the ship. The 4.5" turret gets its gun. Then the main mast top antenna array is built up. The Goalkeeper gets its barrel and to the 30mm Oerlikon DS30 guns. Two quad Harpoon launchers are built up from a PE frame with resin missile tubes, the PE blast shields to go behind them. The type 911 Fire Control Radar is built up as are the Sat Com platforms. The DF antenna for the bridge roof gets built up, and if you are fitting them the mini gun enclosures. Last up are the decoys and their ejector racks. The gun goes on the fore deck and the forward Sea Wolf launcher behind it in front of the bridge. The main fore mast is next with the main radar on top followed by the many PE arms and other parts including a navigation radar being fitted. The Sat Com antennas are fitted to the Engine intake block, here there are PE railings to fit and also ladders which go on the front of the intake covers. The rear mast is next with the main antenna pole and antenna array being fitted to the top. Here again there are many PE arms to the mast and smaller fittings. To the front of the hanger the crane for the ships boats is fitted, and the boats in the landing area there. Along all the main decks PE railings are fitted with netting type areas next to the 30mm deck fittings. There are also life raft canisters to fit to the deck. There are also man overboard life ring ejectors to fit. Moving aft the rear deck goes on, and to the starboard side of the hanger the ships gangway. Above this go additional life rafts and the fuel can stowage racks to the inflatable boats. Above the hanger and on the rear Sea Wolf Radar platform more railings go on. Forward of the hanger deck there is another small boat crane, and forward of that the two triple torpedo tubes. Moving back to the flight deck the harpoon grid is fitted to the centre, and around the outsides the flight deck netting is fitted. If you want to close the hanger then a PE door is supplied for this. The aft Sea Wolf launcher is fitted to the hanger roof. Next we move to the lower hull with two stabiliser fins being added to each side. The propeller shafts go on, with the props on the ends and the ships rudder behind these. We now jump back to the main deck. Davits are made up for the main ships boats. There is also a late fit RHIB platform to be fitted on the port side of the funnel These are for the late fit Pacific 24 RHIBs which replaced the Cheverton on the starboard side. The data link radome is now added to the front of the hanger deck. For Campbeltown use the solid mast, for other ships cut the radome off and use the PE lattice mast. Decals The single decal sheet contains the main pennant numbers and ships names for the 4 ships as well as Ships Crests, Flags, Ensigns, draft marks and helicopter landing markings. Conclusion Well, Atlantic Models have done it again, producing a kit that fills another hole in the Royal Navy Cold War story, that of the last of the Type 22s. This is not a kit for the novice but it will with time and care build into a great looking model. Very Highly Recommended. This last shot shows the main upper casting with the main parts added as a dry fit to show how well the fit and to give an idea of how the kit will end up looking even without all the detail parts fitted. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  11. 4.7" / 60 Gunbarrels for RN Destroyers & Secondary Mountings Atlantic Models 1:350 The 4.7" Quick Firing Gun was used in all Royal Navy Destroyers and on larger ships as secondary guns. This set from Atlantic models which are made by Master Barrels contains 6 of these barrels. The brass will always be more accurate than either white metal or resin, but at a cost hence why they are available as seperate parts should the modeller wish to use them. Conclusion Well, Atlantic Models have done it again, giving the modeller an option of using the brass barrels. While not listed on their site yet, just give them a shout and im sure they will get you a set. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  12. HMS Musketeer 1943 British "M" Class Destroyer Atlantic Models 1:350 HMS Musketeer was an M Class destroyer built for the Royal Navy during WWII. The M Class were an extension of the pre war L Class. Lessons learnt from the Spanish Civil War persuaded the Admiralty that better anti-aircraft capability was needed for new vessels. The vessels would have six 4.7" guns housed in twin turrets, the QF Mark IX mount threw a heavier shell weighing 62Lb over the previous 50lb, however the gun was only able to elevate to 50 degrees which made it a compromise for anti aircraft operations. Turrets were made with an elevation of 80 degrees as fitted to HMS Ark Royal but these were to big for destroyers. The Ships were the first to be fitted with enclosed turrets which were supposed to the waterproof for the crews (however use showed this not to be 100% true). Musketeer was ordered from Fairfield's on the Clyde in 1939 and launched in 1941. The ships were designed for the Artic as featured steam heating for the turrets and torpedo tubes. The aft bank of torpedo tubes was removed to allow fitting of a high angled 4" AA mount. Additional AA guns added were 4 x 20mm Oerlikons, 1 x 4 barrelled Pom Pom , and a pair of quad 50 cal machine gun mount. Anti submarine weapons were stern rails for the depth charges as well as two throwers. HMS Musketeer would fight in the Artic, Western Approaches and finally the Mediterranean. Post war the surviving M Class were transferred to the Turkish Navy except Musketeer, she was sold for scrap and broken up in 1955. The Kit The kit comes in the standard sturdy Atlantic Models box filled with plenty of poly chips to protect the contents. The metal, and resin parts are contained in zip lock bags stapled to a piece of card. The upper and lower hull sections are further protected from damage, by being wrapped in bubble wrap. There is a long envelope found at the bottom of the box containing the sheet of etched brass. When the hull is unwrapped the first thing that strikes you is the cleanliness of the resin. At just a tad over 12" long it is silky smooth, with no sign of deformation, bubbles or other imperfections. The kit is a WEM kit which has been re-released by Atlantic models and updated. The kit has 3D printed patterns cast in resin with the twin MkXI gun turret that has the 4.7"/50 gun barrels fitted separately so that they can be elevated as required. The new torpedo tube sets are unique to the L & M class having the centre tube removed from the standard quintuple bank. The 4" HA single gun mounting that replaced the aft set of torpedo tubes only needs adding its gun sight. The kits hand rails are now done in PE. The ships boats were also 3D printed and then cast in resin the normal way. The result is a kit where modellers should not need to go out and buy anything (except decals, see the note on decals) to produce a great looking model The upper and lower hulls are joined together by several pips and holes, but I find that it’s easier to remove the pips and align everything by eye and by feel as they tend to leave a large gap whereas by removing them, the gap almost disappears and there is very little need to filling, just a light touch with a sanding stick. The rest of the resin parts are just as well moulded, although the large sections of the superstructure do appear to have small pips on their undersides that need to be removed. The white metal parts don’t have a lot of flash, but there are seams that will need removing, again, a fairly easy job. The large etch sheet is what we have come to expect from Atlantic Models, beautiful clean relief etching, great design and lots of parts, and is probably the area that makes these models more for the experienced modeller than even the resin. Before any construction can take place, make sure you clean all the parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any mould release agent that may be attached. Naturally for these kits, it’s sub assemblies first. The two PE quad 50 Cal mounts are first, followed by the Pom Pom, which is a mix of resin, white metal & PE. The resin Turrets get their white metal barrels and the OE 20mm Oerlikons are built up. The last weapons system to be built is the HA 4" the gun is white metal (or resin) with a resin & PE base. Next up the ships boats get attached to their PE Davits. Next up all the sub assemblies and deck structure can be fitted to the main hull. From bow to stern; A & B turret go on, followed by the main deck house and bridge including the gun director; then the funnel, pom pom mount, torpedo tubes, twin 20mm deck mount, HA 4" mount and then finally X turret. Next up smaller parts can be fitted, the ships boats (2 each side) and under the bridge two carley float stowage racks. A pair of 20mm mounts go on the bridge wings, and two signal lamps on the signal platform below the gun director. Moving further aft the wireless house goes in front of the deck for the X turret. Two further carley float stowage racks go on near the aft 20mm mounts, and another two beside the X turret. On the quarterdeck are fitted the depth charge rails, the two throwers and a single 20mm mount on the centreline. Next up the fore mast is assembled and added, the funnel cap grill can go on, and the 285 & 286 radar antennas are fitted. If building the ship after 1942 the type 286 needs to be replaced by the 291 antenna (both are in the kit). If making a full hull model the the twin screws, shafts and single rudder can go on. The PE sheet also supplies a whole host of smaller fittings including; railings, accommodation ladders, anchors, splinter matting, and ships name plates,. Decals These ships carried few markings except the Pennant numbers. WEM did not provide the decals in the kit when they had it, and the logistics of printing a very small decal sheet for each kit would have been time consuming and expensive so Atlantic models have produced a generic sheet ATDec02. This is an A5 sheet and provides the Flag Superior Letters and Pennant Numbers for all classes of Destroyers and Escort Vessels in Royal Navy and Commonwealth Service during World War 2. It contains letters and numerals in four colours, (Black and White and Light and Dark Grey) There are sufficient of each numerals to be able to place a double numbered pennant on each side of the ships hull(eg. H177 or F112) plus smaller sets for the stern numbers. The light and dark grey letters and numerals can be cut to shape and laid onto a light and dark camouflage pattern as required to give the two tone effect seen on several wartime era ships. A colour plan is included with call outs in Colourcoats paints. Conclusion Well, Atlantic Models have done it again, upgrading the kit to provide the modeller something which will look great direct from the box. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  13. Those of you who know me (largely from prolonged builds in the aircraft section - notably a 1/48 Seaking HAS5, as yet unfinished) will know that I recently got a new job after 2 very frustrating years of unemployment. Though this is a Very Good Thing by any standard, it has meant that I have not touched a model of any sort in about 2 months - also partly because of the hot weather, which made my man cave barely habitable. The job is in London, which means that I am staying up here 2 or 3 nights per week. Aha! Modelling time. The Seaking is much too delicate in its current state to be moved up to the Smoke, so I have decided to start something new. I joined the RN in 1978, straight from school, but was lucky enough to get a university cadetship (paid to be a student; what’s not to like?). In the long Summer holidays you were sent to sea for about 8 weeks - I assumed that we’d be doing fishery protection in a Ton, or similar (which would have been fine), but for some reason best known to the Admiralty, even my Summer 1979 training came into the Jammy Sod category; I joined HMS Dido. In Perth. As in Western Australia. She was part of a task group (I think led by Norfolk, and I remember a Type 12 and a Tribal being with us, among others) that deployed for 7 months - I joined her in Fremantle and left to fly home from Sydney in mid-trip. It was rough, I tell you (actually it really WAS rough crossing the Australian Bight, but that’s another story). So Dido was my first ship, and since I have a long term plan to build every ship in which I served (Dido, London, Norfolk (both DLGs, not the later 22 & 23), Fearless, Boxer, Ark Royal, Broadsword & Blackwater, in that order), she wins. The kit will be Peter Hall’s (Atlantic Models, for those who don’t know him) 1/350 resin, white metal & PE kit - and if you have never built an Atlantic kit, do yourself a favour and do so, because they are stunning. In due course, Norfolk & London will also be from the same stable. While I was away from the forum, Flickr seems to have followed Photobucket into oblivion / flithy lucre (it won’t let me in without signing up for Yahoo, and since I’d rather poke out my own eyes than go back to Yahoo, I’m looking for my 3rd picture host in 9 months). I seem to have settled on Village.Photos...but have yet to work out how to post from there onto here using an iPad... [Any tips gratefully received!] So pictures will follow in due course. Thus far nothing much to see anyway; just cleaning up parts and poring over references. But it is nice to be back. @perdu, @Martian Hale and my other friends, you’ll find me over here in the watery section for a while. More soon Crisp [Test photo - showing the work done to remove the 4.5” turret base and 2nd breakwater, and fettle the Ikara handling room etc to fit onto the front of the bridge screen. Plus the Jecobin plns of Euryalus, Dido’s sister. This is all dry fitting at the moment]
  14. It has taken some time but here are some photographs of my build of HMS Brereton a Ton Class mine hunter as she appeared in 1985 when she was attached to the Mersey Division of the Royal Navy Reserve. I managed to spend a weekend on board sailing from Liverpool to Douglas in the Isle of Man when I was a Sea Cadet. The model is based on the Atlantic Models kit and this is the first kit I have built from this range. I have made some improvements to this kit by designing and having manufactured some Photo-Etch detail. There is a complete build log on forum here: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235001978-ton-class-mine-hunter-hms-brereton-and-minesweeper-hms-wotton-1350-scale-atlantic-models-kit/#comment-2348495 This gives some details about my build and about the Ton class that might be useful for anyone wanting to build one of these fine ships. So here is my model of HMS Brereton: I designed my own Photo Etch to enhance the model: As a post script, I have a spare set of the Photo-Etch available if anyone is interested. I hope you enjoy the pictures and I will back soon with my conversion of the same kit to a Mine Sweeper. Thank you. Paul.
  15. Well I have really enjoyed this build first full resin kit for me some very fine details in the cast parts I have added a couple of crew figures from L'Arsenal and finally managed some daylight photos Thank you to everyone who has helped with information and encouragement. Stay Safe beefy
  16. While I am waiting for base parts to dry on another project thought I would make a start on this it will be my first full Atlantic models kit I have used plenty of the WEM PE sets before so this should be quick and easy The kit is of HMS Peacock there where 5 of these patrol craft used in the 80s and early 90s but when the handover of Hong Kong came about the Royal Navy sold them off 3 to the Philippines and 2 to Irish navy I will be attempting to do as HMS SWIFT one of the two that went to the Irish Navy If anybody has some information on these ships please feel free to add I know some on here have already built this kit so any help appreciated. first few bits glued together and some small amount of filler used on the joints Stay Safe beefy
  17. HMS Relentless Type 15 Frigate Atlantic Models 1:350 The Type 15 Frigates were conversions from the WW2 Emergency Class Destroyers made to fill the need for fast anti submarine vessels. These ships were introduced to the fleet from 1951 and filled the role until replaced by the new Type 12 and Leander class Frigates, the last being withdrawn in the early 1970s, as such HMS Relentless started life as an R class destroyer, commissioned in November 1942 and carried out her duties as an anti-submarine escort, both in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean throughout the war. After the war she was placed into reserve until 1949. She spent the next two years being converted into a Type 15 anti-submarine frigate. Placed in reserve again from 1956 to 1964 she was once again called to the front line, but only for a year, as she was put up for disposal, finally being sold for scrap in 1971. The Kit The kit comes in the standard sturdy Atlantic Models box filled with plenty of poly chips to protect the contents. The metal, (8 pieces), and resin, (20 pieces) parts are contained in zip lock bags stapled to a piece of card. The upper and lower hull sections are further protected from damage, by being wrapped in bubble wrap. There is a long envelope found at the bottom of the box containing the sheet of etched brass, whilst a separate zip lock bag contains the sheet of decals. When the hull is unwrapped the first thing that strikes you is the cleanliness of the resin. It is silky smooth, with no sign of deformation, bubbles or other imperfections. The upper and lower hulls are joined together by several pips and holes, but I find that it’s easier to remove the pips and align everything by eye and by feel as they tend to leave a large gap whereas by removing them, the gap almost disappears and there is very little need to filling, just a light touch with a sanding stick. The rest of the resin parts are just as well moulded, although the large sections of the superstructure do appear to have small pips on their undersides that need to be removed. As seen in the photos, some of the smaller parts have a fair bit of flash, but it’s very soft and easily removed. The white metal parts don’t have a lot of flash, but there are seams that will need removing, again, a fairly easy job. The large etch sheet is what we have come to expect from Atlantic Models, beautiful clean relief etching, great design and lots of parts, and is probably the area that makes these models more for the experienced modeller than even the resin. Before any construction can take place, make sure you clean all the parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any mould release agent that may be attached. Naturally for these kits, it’s sub assemblies first. These include the Twin 4” HA/LA gun, consisting of the resin turret, metal gun barrels two PE seats and a pair of rocket rails, one for each side of the turret. Next is the twin 40mm Bofors Mk5, which is made up from the resin turret, metal barrels, and PE shield, seats and sights. The resin funnel is fitted with PE cap, four platforms and two sirens. The rest of the sub-assemblies are all PE, and include the two whip aerial masts, the two piece Type 277 radar antenna with IFF, the five piece foremast top and the seven piece foremast, which once assembled is glued into place on the bridge structure, along with the Type 277 radar, railings, foremast top and bridge wing supports. The mainmast is then assembled from six PE parts and is fitted to the superstructure aft of the funnel, along with the MCDF antenna and bracket which is attached to the starboard side of the structure. The aft superstructure is fitted with the 4” gun director and railings. Aft of gun mount you have a choice of either a pair of Squid mortar mounts, or a pair of Mk.10 mortars. The instructions then call for all the ships railings to be glued into position, but I would generally leave these off until last. The anchors can be fitted though, as well as the ships boats, davits, both gun mountings, as well as the whip aerial masts, PE signal flag lockers, Dan buoy, fuel can rack and cable reels, for which the modeller will need to provide some plastic rod from their own stock. If you are building this as a waterline model then you can miss off the next bit as it’s the fitting of the rudder, propeller shafts, A frames and propellers. Decals The single decal sheet contains the main pennant numbers and ships names for the entire list of Type 15 conversions as well as the bridge windows, depth marks, Union Jack and the White Ensign in two sizes. The decals are very nicely printed, with very little carrier film and are quite thin, although I understand they aren’t as thin as Atlantic's own HMS Leopard and HMS Puma kits, which were a little too unforgiving. Unfortunately the review kit decals were quite badly damaged on arrival, as you can see in the accompanying photograph. So it would be wise to check yours before starting the build. Atlantic have confirmed they will replace any damaged sheets as they are aware of the issue. Conclusion Well, Atlantic Models have done it again, producing a kit that fills another hole in the Royal Navy Cold War story. It may not be on everyone's wish list, but seeing how it’s quite a simple, (relatively), kit to build, it might be a good second or third resin model in preparation for one of Atlantic Models big destroyers. For me it is another winner from Peter. The mouldings are superb, the etch amazing and even if you don’t like the use of white metal, there is still a place for it if it helps produce amazing models, which with a bit of care this kit can be done. Just a shame about the decals in this case. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  18. Last year at Scale Model World at Telford I took one of Peter Hall's H-class destroyers off his hands for a project: The kit is Atlantic Models ATK35058 HMS Hesperus, a Brazilian H with the later design of bridge. Due to a family connection, I wish to build the I-class destroyer HMS Imperial, pennant number D09, which was built by Hawthorn Leslies in Tyneside in 1936. The I class was a continuation of the Brazilian H making Peter's kit a very good starting point, however there are some differences to be addressed. The easiest problem is that the I-class had 4 of the 4.7in QF Mk.IX single mounts. The Hesperus kit provides 3, lacking Y-turret. Peter kindly supplied my kit with a fourth mount knowing my plans for this kit. Next up, the H-class funnels were unequal height but both had oval cross sections. On the I-class, the aft funnel was taller, approximately equal in height to the forward funnel. The forward funnel was circular in cross section. Armed with a set of plans (again, thank you Peter!) I set about extending the aft funnel and replacing the forward funnel. This is the aft funnel from the H-class in situ: I cut out a piece of modelling board the correct thickness to insert into the funnel, then chopped the aft funnel in two. Unfortunately the steam pipes had to go to enable shaping of the insert. The modelling board was glue in between the two resin parts: The fit of the upper and lower parts of the hull is excellent. I will go as far as to say that Peter's resin kit fits together far better than any injection moulded ship kit from Trumpeter that I have assembled. I have purchased some photographs of HMS Imperial for reference. Whilst well photographed before the war, I know of only a single image taken during the war. I have ordered (for £21) a high resolution copy of this image from the Australian War Memorial: https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/133585/ I hope that in high resolution it can offer some clue as to how HMS Imperial was painted in the Mediterranean in 1941. If not, then she shall be painted in 507C in pre-war guise. There is a good reel of footage on Roland Smith's Royal Navy in Colour DVD taken from HMS Ivanhoe which appears to show some of the 3rd Flotilla in all-over Mediterranean Grey (507C) whilst others look to have Home Fleet Grey hulls with Mediterranean Grey upperworks. I cannot make out HMS Imperial's pennant anywhere on the footage, but all of the destroyers in the footage clearly show the 3 bands on the aft funnel to be in red. The neutrality stripes on B-turret are in the usual red, white and blue. I have started work on the deck painting. Those who have been steering me on paint research have also been helping me more recently with deck coatings. What a minefield! The I-class were trialled with 3 comparable latex-based trowel-on deck coatings from 3 different manufacturers. Semtex Ltd was one supplier. The trouble is, that the three products were different colours, one described as "the colour of dry asphalt", one green and one brown. There may have been 9" high bands of contrasting colour around the base of superstructure items the troweled on stuff butted up against. So far, I cannot determine which manufacturer's product was which colour, nor even which groups of 3 I-class ships received the products from each of the 3 suppliers. Whilst I am keen on getting things right, I am also pragmatic and in the interests of actually building this model rather than pontificating until I depart this world, I had to make a decision. There is reasonable evidence to support the bridge and platforms being linoleum covered, which gives us some brown colour, so I chose a grey that looks like the roads around the North East of Scotland, on the rare occasions when they are dry. I have sprayed the main kit parts accordingly. At this point, I realised that the little platform at the back is surplus to requirements, as Imperial carried two pentad 21in torpedo tube mounts. The H-class kit provides a single quintuple torpedo tube mount. I could scratchbuild them, but am exploring alternatives presently.
  19. Steam Gun Boat HMS Grey Goose Atlantic Models 1/350 HMS GREY GOOSE was built in 1942 and was one of a series of seven Denny type steam gunboats, planned as miniature destroyers, their steel hulls with steam turbines were intended to give superior type of all weather motor torpedo and gunboats, however their vulnerability to small calibre gunfire (all those steam pipes!) and their poor acceleration proved embarrassing, the intended programme for more vessels was cut back, only the seven GREY boats were built of a planned 60 boats, they did however prove very useful as high speed stripped down blockade runners going to Sweden to bring back loads of ball-bearings. At one time commanded by Sir Peter Scot (painter & naturalist) GREY GOOSE achieved her greatest fame when after the war she was converted by Vospers to an experimental gas-turbine powered vessel. S HM SGB-9 was built by J Samuel White & Co at Cowes, Isle of Wight. She was laid down on 23rd January 1941 and was launched on 14th February 1942. She was commissioned on 4th July that year. On completion, she was 145 ft 8 in long, 20 ft wide across the beam and displaced 220 tons at full load. She is still extant and moored at Hoo Marina in Kent, having been tastefully converted to a house boat. The Model Originally announced several years ago by White Ensign Models it never saw the light of day as the company ceased trading. Fortunately Peter Hall of Atlantic Models kept the project alive and now has finally been released. The kit arrives in a small cardboard box filled with polystyrene peanuts, and comes complete with, and rather unusually for a narrow seas model, a two piece hull, a small resin block and a small etched brass fret. The main hull, which is just under 5 inches, (120mm) long, and is a superbly moulded item, There is a bit of flash on the lower hull section and some resin nibs on the mating surface. But these won’t be a problem as I’m sure most builds will be as a waterline, so the lower hull can be put to one side. The rest of the hull and "superstructure" is beautifully moulded, with no sign of pinholes or other defects. Another small bag contains the rest of the resin items, namely the funnel, 6pdr mountings, torpedo tubes, dinghy, 20mm Oerlikon mountings, 3” mounting, 20mm gun platform, life rafts and cowl vents. The rest of the parts come on a smallish etched brass fret. Construction begins the choice of whether to build the model full hull or waterline. If full hull the the lower hull section should be glued to the upper hull and the seam filled and sanded as required. The lower hull comes with the propeller shafts, A frames and rudders moulded integrally, all you need to do is add the pair of PE propellers. The 3” gun mounting is assembled by fitting the PE gun shield and support arms to the resin mounting, this is followed by the 20mm Oerlikon and depending on the option the modeller chooses, two of these need to be assembled from 3 parts of PE and a resin pintle. Whilst we’re on sub-assemblies, the two PE 0.5” turret platforms are folded to shape, as is the Holman projector and fore mast assembly which is made up from the brass rod lower mast, PE upper mast section and PE radar aerials. The two platforms are then glue in position, followed by the resin funnel, metal cowl vents, two torpedo tubes, PE ships wheel in the bridge, and the main mast spreader fitted at the stern. The modeller can then fit either the Holman projector on 20mm Oerlikon to the bandstand glued to the amidships superstructure. The 3” assembly is also glued into place, as are the ships railings, dinghy, dinghy davit, and life rafts. Behind the breakwater, one of the 6pdr mountings is fitted, while the bow chaser 6pdr can be replaced with the second Oerlikon depending on what mod state the modeller wishes to build. The two PE twin 0.5” Vickers machine guns are then folded to shape and fitted to their respective turrets either side of the bridge, followed by the foremast assembly which is fitted aft of the bridge, which is fitted with a windscreen. As is usual, the colour call outs are for Colourcoats paints, available from Sovereign Hobbies. Conclusion Well, it’s been an awfully long time coming, but the wait is certainly worth it, as this is a cracking little kit, and while the construction isn’t actually difficult, the rolling and bending of some of the PE parts could be a little awkward for those not used to working with etched brass. As with the other narrow seas models, this will make for a very nice vignette or as part of a bigger diorama, but will be just as home in full hull in a display cabinet. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  20. Fairmile D MGB 660 Atlantic Models 1/350 The Fairmile D has to be one of the most popular boat used in the narrow seas, certainly by this reviewer. Following on from the earlier Fairmile boats the D was designed purely as a gun boat to take on the German S boats, although it never matched the speed of the S boats the armament was such that if intercepted they could easily overwhelm the German vessels. When fitted with even heavier weapons and torpedo tubes, these boats were able to take on much larger craft with considerable success. Around 229 D’s were built between 1942 and 1945. The Model The kit arrives in a small cardboard box filled with polystyrene peanuts, and comes complete with single piece hull, a small resin block and a small etched brass fret. The main hull, which is around 2 inches, (50mm) long, and is a beautifully moulded item, although the review example has one very small remnant of a moulding stub on the stern, but this is well below the waterline so when using in a diorama it may well be ignored, unless the modeller is really picky, even then they will easily be removed with a sharp scalpel or a few swipes of a sanding stick. The rest of the hull and "superstructure" is very clean and nicely done. Another small bag contains the rest of the resin items, namely the dinghy, life rafts, 6pdr mounting, twin 20mm mounting and 2pdr mounting. The rest of the parts come on a smallish etched brass fret. As can be seen in the photo there is quite a bit of thin resin around each of these parts that will need to be carefully removed with a sanding stick or scalpel. Construction begins with the assembly of the twin Oerlikon mounting with the fitting of the two guns to the resin mounting along with the separate sighting and laying frame. Two single Oerlikons, each consisting of the barrel with sights attached and which have to be folded to shape, the two sides of the breech section and the gun shield. These are then attached to the moulded pintles on either side of the bridge The 6pdr mounting resin part is fitted with the sight and armoured top box before being glued into position. With the weaponry fitted to their respective positions, the bridge is fitted with the windscreen, the anchor is mounted on the foredeck and the mast glued into position and fitted with the small yardarm and upper mast section with gaff attached. The ships wheel is fitted as is the hatch aft of the bridge, along with its associated railings. The rest of the ships railings can then be fitted in their respective positions, and that is pretty much it, unless you are going to mount the model in a display case, in which case the four propeller shafts, propellers and two rudders can be fitted. Since there are a number of Fairmile D versions being re-released the etch sheet does have quite a lot of spare parts which can be used to modify this kit into the boat of your choice according to the references you are using. Conclusion This is another great re-release, and Peter Hall should be thanked for bringing this wonderful little kit back on the market. As usual the resin moulding is superb with absolutely no sign of defects such as pin holes etc, only the tiny bit of moulding stub needs to be cleaned up. It is also another great kit for those new to resin and etch which lends itself to a whole raft of different scenarios for a diorama or vignette. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  21. 73ft Motor Torpedo Boat Atlantic Models 1/350 Motor Torpedo Boat (MTB) 379 was the prototype of a new Royal Navy design for a 73-foot fast attack flush decked wooden MTB combining torpedo and heavier gun armament. Chief designer was Commander Peter du Cane, Managing Director of Vosper Ltd, Portsmouth, UK. Power was provided by three 1400 horsepower Packard petrol engines. Top speed was 39 knots at full power. Armament was four 18-inch torpedo tubes, one 20mm Oerlikon gun and two twin Lewis .303 machine guns. Sixteen of this Type 1 design were built as MTB 380-395 and five Type 2 boats were built as MTB 524-527 featuring a six-pounder gun. MTB 379 was ordered in 1942 and built in early 1943 with the other boats being built thereafter. These MTBs were widely used in naval operations in the English Channel and along the coast of occupied Europe until 1945. The Model The kit arrives in a small, ziplock poly bag, complete with single piece hull, a small resin block and a small etched brass fret. The main hull, which is around 1.5 inches, (37.5mm) long, and is a beautifully moulded item, although the review example had two very small defect on the starboard side lower hull, near the chine and a slight moulding stub on the bow and stern, but these are all below the waterline so when using in a diorama they may well be ignored, unless the modeller is really picky, even then they will easily be removed with a sharp scalpel or a few swipes of a sanding stick. The rest of the hull and "superstructure" is very clean and nicely done. Another small bag contains the rest of the resin items, these are the four 18” torpedo tubes and four ventilator cowls, although the review sample only came with three as one seems to have been knocked off the moulding block and it definitely wasn’t in the bag. These items have a small amount of soft resin flash and pour stubs which are readily cleaned up. Otherwise they are once again nicely moulded. The rest of the parts are contained on the single, smallish etched brass sheet. These include the mast assembly, which is folded together to make the complete mast, with the radar antenna already in place. Just the anemometer and yardarm to attach and it’s ready to glue into position. The forward mounted twin 20mm cannon mounting consists of the guns which need to be folded into position, the separate sight, pintle, which isn’t actually needed on this kit as the pedestal is pre-moulded on the hull and shield. The bandstand railings are then carefully rolled to shape and glued in place. The rest of the brass fittings include the boats wheel and windshield for the bridge, two liferings, three deck hatches, jackstaff, anchor and railings for the bow and stern. On the forward pair of tubes there is a rocket projector, each required to be folded to make the complete part. On the rear tubes there are a pair of twin Vickers machine guns, which like the Oerlikon also need to be folded to shape along with the pintle and each gun fitted with a drum magazine. If required the model can be fitted with the three propeller shaft skegs, propellers and rudders, but as these kit will most likely find themselves in a diorama or vignette then they can be left off. Conclusion It’s great to see this and other narrow seas boats being re-released by Atlantic Models, having been lost to the modelling world since White Ensign went down. This is a great little kit and would be a good starter piece for those not used to working with resin or etch. Look forward to seeing other boats in the range being re-released as well as number of new kits which are or the drawing board. The instructions show the paint scheme for MTB 379 using Colourcoats paints, but if you wish you can paint it for whatever boat you wish to depict as there are no decals to worry about. Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of
  22. Well making headway with a couple of builds so decided to start on this oldie goldie and will be adding the Atlantic Models PE set something about these type of WW2 destroyers that just makes me want to build them Oh and MTB,s as well You can see from the price tag how old this kit is £1.99 I wish they where that price now. Got this kit given to me by a good friend a few year ago the hull molding is way to deep for the platting and nearly non existent for the raised parts oh well here goes Port holes starting to be drilled out before the plating is toned down And the very full PE sheet from Peter hall and you can see the difference of the hull sides so far no illusion I have two kits and PE to do another version later told you I liked these type of ships beefy
  23. I keep seeing posts suggesting that people are reluctant to build resin kits and/or keep wishing for kits to be available that actually are available - only in resin. As with injection moulded plastic kits, not all manufacturers are equal. Some plastic kits are absolute gems whilst others are abominations that are not worth the time and consumables to build. Likewise, not all resin kits are equal. Some negative common perceptions of resin kits include the following: - They're really expensive. They are more expensive than a plastic kit, but resin makes it financially viable to even consider some subjects like an S class destroyer. Perhaps more importantly, look at the contents. A basic plastic destroyer in 1/350 might cost around £30 (typical UK prices for 1/350 Tamiya destroyers like Yukikaze and Kagero are nearer to £60). If happy with what's in the box, I'm delighted for you. A sizable number though will then spend the same again on detailing to replace unrepresentative clunky plastic. With a kit like that featured in this thread, it's all included in the box. You don't need anything else to make a very nice model. - But nothing fits, right? Wrong. Not much else to say on that. As with plastic kits it depends who made the tooling and the casting technique. This thread will not omit any flaws in the kit's parts fit. You can see for yourself how it compares to most plastic kits. - Resin parts all need to be sawn off casting blocks. It's tedious, messy and I can't cut straight and it'll be ruined. Not an issue here. There are very small bits to remove, but in discrete places and can be done with a scalpel or modelling chisel. Less work that cleaning sprue gates from injection moulded plastic. - The dust from sanding is harmful to breathe in. Who in their right mind doesn't sand wet anyway? Dry sanding just clogs your abrasives regardless what you're working with and keeps all dust out of the air. It's just the correct way to sand. According to the time stamp on the photo, everything was as-new in its box at 18:18 this evening here's what's inside That's a set of instructions identifying and providing the correct name for all parts, diagramatic assembly instructions with notes, a full colour painting guide, pressure cast resin hull split at the waterline, bagged resin smaller parts and cast white metal small fittings. Here is the preparation needed to join the hull. There are some very small protrusions to clean off with a blade. The bigger one is a locating pin. That was 18:23. I hadn't done anything to change the condition of the kit contents from as-new yet. So, I trimmed those off and glued the hull together with medium CA. The fit is better than many injection moulded plastic hulls I've joined but not perfect. I will now point out the flaws and how much of a non-event it is to fix them. I wouldn't normally bother but to help the flaws and sanding stand out in photos for this thread, I gave it a quick blast with Halfords primer then had some food while it dried Off to the kitchen sink with an Infini Model sanding sponge I smoothed down the hull join. With a good abrasive like the Infini sponge and water, the whole lot took around 10 to 15 minutes. I got a bit careless and took some material off one of the strakes. Before remembering I was going to set this in water like Imperial, I fixed it with plasticard I then filled the waterline seam with putty. I keep getting educated by people who know better that I can't use normal modelling putties on resin because it doesn't stick, but none of the resin things I've ever worked with got that memo. The time stamp on that photo was 19:24 tonight. One hour and one minute including a dinner break to get to a joined, filled hull. And that's with me repairing self-inflicted damage (that will be hidden underwater anyway).
  24. Due to a family connection... I wished to build the I-class destroyer HMS Imperial, pennant number D09, which was built by Hawthorn Leslies in Tyneside in 1936. The I class was a continuation of the Brazilian H making Peter's kit a very good starting point, however there are some differences to be addressed. The easiest problem is that the I-class had 4 of the 4.7in QF Mk.IX single mounts. The Hesperus kit provides 3, lacking Y-turret. Peter kindly supplied my kit with a fourth mount knowing my plans for this kit. Next up, the H-class funnels were unequal height but both had oval cross sections. On the I-class, the aft funnel was taller, approximately equal in height to the forward funnel. The forward funnel was circular in cross section. Armed with a set of plans (again, thank you Peter!) I set about extending the aft funnel and replacing the forward funnel. New 3D printed 4.7in Mk.IX QF guns were sourced from Shapeways but the barrels were as poor as the breach end was brilliant The barrels were thus sawn off and replaced with brass The torpedo mounts were likewise replaced by Shapeways items. They were extremely expensive for what they are, but they look nice The pair of Vickers 0.5in quad machine gun mounts were replaced with Tetra Modelworks items which I had used before on a HMS Hood build as was very happy with them I did as best I could in interpreting the scheme from the single wartime photograph I have ever seen. I had to pay around £20 for this from the Australian War Memorial to get a high resolution version to even find out if the photograph showed anything - the low-resolution version online just showed a smudge where the ship claimed to be So, after a few months' work, here it is. I never really finish model ships - I just stop. I plan to get some better paravanes and fit them to the deck at the stern, and I will definitely get some crew members to stand on watch when they become available from Northstar. For now though, it's safely in my display cabinet
  25. I have wanted this ship ever since,my Dad serviced on her,and I went aboard her ,in the late 70's.I will not go into her history ,there is plenty of books and on the net.I will talk about the kit.Its not the same standard as Flyhawk or Orange hobby,but I don't care.I have added a lot of detail around the walk ways and added more detail to the bridge.All the boat decks are not wide enough and the ships boats are not correct. You will need two sets of decals ,the reason ,I will show when I down load the photo's.The photo etching is to the high stardard from Peter Hall. Ever since I received the kit I have been working on her.First had to add the stern deck.Interesting approach . I have not added that much detail in the stern ,looked at my other carriers and realised it was not worth it.
×
×
  • Create New...