Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags '3d print'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Forum Functionality & Forum Software Help and Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modeling using 3D Printing
    • 3D Printing Basics
    • 3D Printing Chat
    • 3D Makerspace
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • Amarket Modl
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Beacon Models
    • BlackMike Models
    • Bring-It!
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • EBMA Hobby & Craft
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Fonthill Media
    • HMH Publications
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • KLP Publishing
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Kingkit
    • MikroMir
    • Model Designs
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Paulus Victor Decals
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Starling Models
    • Test Valley Models
    • The48ers
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

  1. Hello Chaps, This is my first post in this section, not technically space or Sci Fi but at the same time it is... As you can probably tell from my name, I really like ELO, the first album I bought was a little known masterpiece called 'ZOOM' when released in 2001, I think it is one of the best relatively unknown albums ever produced. What I was drawn too was the fantastic album cover as a 12 year old it was great and I've been hooked ever since. I am going to attempt to model this particular beautifully grungy version as a display, modelled in Fusion 360 and printed on the elegoo mars resin printer, I have spent around 2 hours fiddling and I have the basic shape set, still a lot of surface details and greebles to add but it's a good start, as you can see I am having to add a little bit of artistic licence to the engine area. I will attempt to print the blue glass in blue resin and ad some illumination. I am printing one of at 1/4 of the intended size as a test. Lets see how this goes Cheers, Andy.
  2. Hello A few photos of my newest project. It is a resin model printed on an Anycubic 3d printer. Cheers.
  3. A while back during one of my all too frequent interweb trawls, I happened across this shot purporting to be that of a 28 Sqn Avro 504K. My heart sank. I thought I was almost there. I had built a Camel, an F2b and and almost everything up to a Wessex with only a Spitfire and a Hurricane left to complete the series. I knew things were too good to be true. I had found an occasional reference to 28 flying a 504 and even a BE2e out there in India but no concrete evidence, just a scurrilous rumor here and there. When I came across this photo I started digging some more, and the more I dug the more it seemed this indeed was a 28 Squadron aircraft. This excerpt from an Airfix magazine back in 1960 states that H2278 was a 6 Sqn aircraft, but the more digging I do the more certain I am that it flew with 28 Sqn - and perhaps with 6 Sqn as well at some point. It's rather depressing isn't it? That now means that I have to build yet another one of those darned biplane things. Oh well I thought - off I scurried to ebay only to discover that the modeling world is not awash with 1/48 scale 504's. There was the SMER kit of course. It was a repop of a repop of a repop and calling it basic would be kind. There was the Blue Max 504 but that was long out of production though reviews appeared to state it was accurate ('ish). Being as dumb as I am, and have proved beyond any reasonable doubt many times on this forum, I thought, well if I can build a Wapiti I'm sure I can build a 504? Regular inhabitants here will recollect our antipodean brethren @Bandsaw Steve's marvellous 504 scratchbuild from a couple of years ago, which I shall be using as a reference in this build. Steve also kindly supplied me with some plans which will be coming in very handy as this build progresses (dangerous assumption p'raps). Now, I'm not sure if transmitting those electrons all the way from down under to up here stretched the electrons a bit but when I started digging into the plans I found some slight discrepancies between the views and the fuselage cross sections... just enough to confuse me and stop me in my tracks. As luck would have it (or so I thought) just a few weeks later a Blue Max 504 popped up on that bay at a very reasonable price. I popped in a bid, and as it turned out I was the only bidder. Maybe I should have asked myself why? Fast forward a few days and this popped up on my bench. Very nice quality box though surprisingly small. The comprehensive instruction sheet. To be fair, they do provide a couple of shots of the model on the reverse side - which don't really help a lot. Decal sheet appears functional, if somewhat basic. WHat about the kit itself though? I think I know why I was the only bidder now. These are the plastic bits, including the plastic worms that got caught up inside the fuselage mold, and as much flash as well, just lots and lots, and LOTS of flash. On everything. This is after all, the Collectors Limited Edition version so there's more. In addition to those quality items shown above, we also get some white metal parts to play with. (sorry but that skid at bottom center just cracks me up) Just where does one start with such a spread before them? Finding a good knife would be a good start. I think this kit will involve more whittling than any of your actual model building. I did try sanding to begin with, but it turns out the days were a bit too short so I resorted to whittling. If you look hard enough you can just about make out some vaguely aircraft shaped parts inside all that flash. It was a lot quicker to scythe off that unwanted plastic then sand the final fraction of a millimeter. Can you get a fraction of a millimeter? Shouldn't it be decimal? For a larf I decided to measure some of the flash. Wow. That's impressive. That 0.62 is the thickness of the flash - not the thickness of the tailplane. The downside to that is that this means the mold was forced open by over half a millimeter under plastic pressure. If the mold was forced open, that also means that the tailplane thickness is going to be increased by that same amount. In 1/48 that's over one scale inch too thick. it was at this point that I pulled out the second kit to take a look at. It's a coin toss as to which one is going to take more work I think I really need to work on my packaging though. It's not quite as eye catching as the Blue Max box is it? Yes, I think I'm going to be doing an ♬ Avro from a bottle ♬ I never learn, do I ? Strangely enough I found all that carving and whittling quite therapeutic and after some effort and a lot of sanding, some of the parts start to look as if they may even belong to the same aeroplane. With a bit, okay then, a lot of work I'm sure it will turn out looking something like a 504 However, a more rewarding alternative awaits me in that bottle of grey goo. It's just needs a bit of pre-work too. As a detour from sanding I sat in front of the laptop for an hour or two and started with something simple. It goes without saying that I completely forgot to take any screenshots of the process. (and just noticed I missed a fillet or two on the trailing edges). Altogether not a very auspicious start, but a start nonetheless. The plan, as stupid as it undoubtedly is, is to create a full 504 kit from printed parts, and maybe even build the Blue Max kit as penance. to be continued... very slowly, probably no, most certainly
  4. Hello Something unusual. On the cgtrader website I found a RoboCop Cain model for 3D printing. The model is scaled to a scale of 1: 6. It is designed as a puppet for time-lapse photos (inspired by the original models used for FX effects during filming). The model contains instructions in PDF format. I took some shortcuts. It will be a static model and reduced to a scale of 1: 8 ( about 32 cm high). This will make assembly a little easier, and secondly my printer will not print such large elements. A few photos of the beginning of the project:
  5. Hello, Now my batman is complete and in the RFI, I thought I'd toy around with this, It was found on CGtrader and printed last night, still needs a little cleanup before starting. I will be trying to replicate my own dog 'Spud' who is a staffie crossed with lab and collie, so the model isn't 100% accurate but close enough. Here is the 1:1 happy dog scale reference. And the resin one, I would have liked to have found a smiling one as my dog always looks furiously happy, I think I will make the ears a little larger to match a little closer. It'll probably be a slow build as I'm also building the new Airfix Buggati Chiron (lovely kit) Cheers, Andy.
  6. Small Arms for Volkssturm Set 3 (P35003) 1:35 3D Print by Special Hobby During the closing days of WWII, the people of Berlin and the surrounding areas were pressed into service as make-do militia soldiers by the desperate hard-core Nazis, and when we say people, it was mostly old men, teenagers and those that had been injured and invalided out of service previously. Some women even took part, and there’s a famous piece of film of a German lady being taught how to use a Panzerfaust by a soldier with a nervous smile on her face. They were given basic training, often no more than on how to operate the weapons they had been given, and sent off to almost certain death, in order to delay the Allies from reaching the higher-ups. The weapons were often old and outdated, so overall they stood little chance of giving a good account of themselves against hardened Allied troops and heavily armoured and armed tanks. This set from Special Hobby is part of a new range that is using direct 3D printing using light-cured resins, which is a technique that is rapidly becoming suitable for making realistic models, even at the budget level. These sets are being produced on more high-end machines, and no layers were visible to my eyes, even with magnification! It arrives in a standard blister pack with orange branding, and lots of foam within to keep the parts safe during transport. The instructions are in the rear, sandwiched between the blister and the card header. Inside is a single printed block of parts that are printed in a light orange resin with what appears to be a lot fewer support struts ensuring that the freshly printed parts don’t sag under their own weight before they are properly cured. There is also a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) for the rifle slings, which should be annealed in a flame to soften before use for your own ease. At first look it looks like a badly strung clothes tree, but on closer inspection you can see a number of weapons and parts within that should be removed with a pair of sharp-nosed clippers, being careful that you don’t accidentally also trim a barrel or stock tube as you go. Care is the watchword here. Once released, you will see that there are four weapons, as follows: EMP44 submachine gun MP3008 submachine gun Volkssturmgewehr VG1 rifle MG81 machine gun The rifles are recipients of the slings, and the instructions show where they fit. The 3008 was a last-ditch design for a cheap, easily produced sub-machine gun, so it is apt that it appears in this set. The MG81 consists of three parts, with separate cocking handle and bipod to be glued in place, and no sling. This was a development of the MG34 used primarily by the Luftwaffe when they moved away from the MG15, and again it was an attempt to reduce costs and material use toward the end of the war. The EMP44 was a failure in terms of design, having only progressed as far as a working prototype by the end of the project, and resembles some really poor plumbing more than a rifle. It is also incorrectly noted on the site’s page as an RMP44. Finally, the VG1 was a simple rifle that was designed as a last-ditch type for the defence of the Reich, with a simple 10-round magazine and was crudely machined and designed when compared to more well-rounded rifles such as the Gehwehr98 that saw action through the whole of WWII. Conclusion Special Hobby have taken full advantage of the advances in 3D printing here, and the results are exquisite, if a little delicate if you’re a fat-fingered goon like me. Take care when handling, and you will end up with a superbly accurate set of arms to add to your next Battle for Berlin project. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Luftschutz Helmets x 2 (P35004) 1:35 Special Hobby 3D Print During WWII, firefighters and rescue workers often laboured while the bombs were still falling in order to save people and buildings from total destruction, or at least to minimise the ravaging fires and reduce the effects on collapsing buildings. Many of these brave folks were volunteers that were either over fighting age or had been invalided out for one reason or another. Nazi Germany too had these people braving death and destruction, and many of them wore a helmet to protect their heads called the Luftschutz. It bore a passing resemblance to the military Stahlhelm, but had extended brims front and rear, with cut-outs over the ears to reduce any effect on hearing that the brims would otherwise have. They were often painted a dark blue and had a winged Swastika on the front, and a leather interior structure to protect the wearer’s head from abrasion and impacts. A leather strap held the helmet on the wearer’s head with a friction buckle keeping it on their head during activity. This set is another direct 3D printed offering from Special Hobby, printed in their pale orange resin using SLA printers for ultimate detail. Inside the standard blister pack are two helmet parts, a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) and a decal sheet for use once the model is painted. The helmets have already been removed from their printing base, with just a single support mark on the flat top that can be sanded off with little effort. The four rivets are present, as are the small perforated ventilation holes on the sides, although you can only just see them because they are small at full-scale, so reduce that by 35 times, and they are utterly minute. Thick paint may obliterate them completely, so take it easy when applying it. The instructions show the location of the straps, which are in two parts like the real thing, and also shows the location of the decals for Luftschutz use as well as other times they were seen during the Prague and Warsaw uprisings. If you’re wondering which is the front, look at it from the side and you will see the brim at the front is shorter than at the rear, in much the same way as a modern firefighter’s helmet. No-one wants hot debris down the back of their jackets, especially when their mind is on other more dangerous things. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. I have two Shermans kits in need of some love & attention, one Asuka M4A1 & another Tamiya M4. I started building them about a year ago when I was commissioned by Stahlhelm Models to design the master for a 1/35 T1E3 Mine Exploder conversion (shameless advertising ). The resin conversion kit has since been released & several other people have built it but my own build remains incomplete! The upcoming Sherman GB has given me the KUTA I need to get these two finally finished before I start on any new Sherman builds First up is the early version of the T1E3 fitted to an Asuka M4A1 Sherman. The hull has been built & a cast texture applied with Mr.Surfacer 500. The suspension & wheels are also done, they are hiding in the box ATM. The turret is the main issue with this build as I want to make a specific tank & the Asuka kit comes with a mid production 75mm turret, I however need a late version though. I dont have the grey prototype parts in the above photo anymore so I'm currently 3D printing a new set. I'm planning to build this kit as Aunt Jemima 2, I have a set of Star Decals that includes the artwork seen on the side of this specific Sherman. Next up is a late version of the T1E3 (sometimes mislabeled as the T1E6) which is fitted with new toothed wheels to improve traction (this version currently isn't available from Stahlhelm Models, but they have the master so if your interested in one send them a message). I used a Tamiya M4 Sherman which other then a few small bit is nearly complete. Once again the cast parts were stippled with Mr.Surfacer to add some texture, the large gaps on the bottom of the sponsons was also filled with plastic card (typical Tamiya) but other then that it was mostly built OOB. The main thing holding this build up was that I wanted to fit it with a set of T49 tracks which were commonly used on the T1E3 because of there better traction in mud. I also want to add some stowage to the rear deck but cant decide on what & how. The above photo shows the parts dry fitted, here they are separated. I used parts from various test prints cobbled together which is why they are different colours & materials. During development I also made a hollow version of the crank with a separate cover & internal chain mechanism. The idea was rejected but I get to use the prototype print on my build to add some extra detail Close up of the rear "push plate", because of the extra wight of the mine rollers sometimes a second Sherman tank was used to help push the T1E3 along. Here is one in action getting a nudge from behind To resolve the parts issues I was having with both builds I picked up a Zvezda M4A2 kit which comes with a late production 75mm turret & a set of T49 tracks that I can borrow. As the M4 is the closest to completion I'll focus on that one for now & start work fitting the new tracks, meanwhile my 3D printer will be making the rest of the parts I need for the M4A1.
  9. One of the iconic characters of the movie Oblivion starring Tom Cruise was undoubtedly the attack drones. These machines became a central part of the movie with recognizable characteristics and identifiable personalities. In the case of Drone 166, there was also a certain viciousness and a grudge. The model is about 8 inches (20 cm) and is mounted on a base that holds sound and lighting electronics. It was 3D printed from files found online but it quickly became apparent they needed help. I used Fusion 360 to rework the main shell and modify it to accept magnets to make the drone configurable from the flight mode to attack mode. I also created new parts to support the different configurations and added LEDs effects. All of the parts were made in Fusion 360. Finishing was done with common household spackle and gray filler primer. Once smooth, I shot a coat of white Tamiya Surfacer/Primer and then final coats were with Tamiya Spray. The parts are printed in PLA, which is remarkably hard and doesn't sand easy. I also used transparent PETG for the lighted parts. All of the electronic components were sourced from Amazon since finding components locally is sadly a thing of the past. Hope you enjoy it! I have a video of Drone 166 with the lights and sound working but don't know how to upload a video...
  10. Small Arms for Volkssturm Set 1 (P35001) 1:35 3D Print by Special Hobby During the closing days of WWII, the people of Berlin and the surrounding areas were pressed into service as make-do soldiers by the desperate hard-core Nazis, and when we say people, it was mostly old men, teenagers and those that had been injured and invalided out of service previously. Some women even took part, and there’s a famous piece of film of a German lady being taught how to use a Panzerfaust by a soldier with a nervous smile on her face. They were given basic training, often no more than on how to operate the weapons they had been given, and sent off to die to delay the Allies from reaching the higher-ups. The weapons were often old and outdated, so overall they stood little chance of giving a good account of themselves against hardened troops and armoured tanks. This set from Special Hobby is part of a new range that is using direct 3D printing using light-cured resins, which is a technique that is rapidly becoming suitable for making realistic models, even at the budget level. These sets are being produced on more high-end machines, and no layers were visible to my eyes, even with magnification! It arrives in a standard blister pack with orange branding, and lots of foam within to keep the parts safe during transport. The instructions are in the rear, sandwiched between the blister and the card header. Inside is a single printed block of parts that are printed in a light orange resin with lots of support struts ensuring that the freshly printed parts don’t sag under their own weight before they are properly cured. There is also a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) for the rifle slings, which should be annealed in a flame to soften it before use for your ease. At first look it looks like a messy Christmas tree, but on closer inspection you can see a number of weapons within that should be removed with a pair of sharp-nosed clippers, being careful that you don’t accidentally also trim a barrel or stock tube as you go. Care is the watchword here. Once released, you can see that there are four guns, as follows: 2 x MP3008 2nd Production (wood stock & tube stock variants) 1 x 6.5mm Karabiner 409(i) (originally Italian Carcano 91) 1 x MG81 Machine Gun The rifles are recipients of the slings, and the instructions show where they fit. The two MP3008s have different stocks and the tube stock variant also has a perforated barrel shroud, giving it a more aggressive look. The 3008 was a last-ditch design for a cheap, easily produced sub-machine gun, so it is apt that it appears in this set. The MG81 consists of three parts, with separate cocking handle and bipod to be glued in place, and no sling. This was a development of the MG34 used primarily by the Luftwaffe when they moved away from the MG15, and again it was an attempt to reduce costs and material use toward the end of the war. As this is a first from Special Hobby, as indicated by the product code, I decided to cut the parts from the supports, as you can’t see them very well half-buried in a forest of self-coloured resin. Cutting them with a single-edged nipper worked well, but take care with the stock tubes and barrels, as they are delicate due to being scale accurate. I managed to snap the barrel on the Carcano 91, but I suspect that was my own fault. Take care though, as they’re too nice to ruin. Conclusion Special Hobby have taken full advantage of the advances in 3D printing here, and the results are exquisite, if a little delicate if you’re a fat-fingered goon like me. Take care when handling, and you will end up with a superbly accurate set of arms to add to your next Battle for Berlin project. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. I printed this bust back in the summer, but I've only just got around to painting it. The 3D sculp is from Archvillain Games on MyMiniFactory, and it's probably the best thing I've printed to date. The level of detail is very impressive with a hand beaten texture on the armour parts, and individual strands on the feathers. Pretty good for a file that only cost about £3.80. I'll definitely be getting more from Archvillain in the future. It was printed on my Mars Pro as a single piece, and stands around 12cm high. The base coats for the skin and the tree were airbrushed with Tamiya acrylics, and everything else was brush painted with a mix of Vallejo, AK Gen 3, and Citadel paints. Thanks for looking Andy
  12. ESK 2000B Gun Camera (7461) 1:72 3D Print by Special Hobby During WWII it was helpful to all combatants to be able to verify claimed kills in order to obtain accurate numbers on enemy attrition, which helped immensely with strategic planning. They were also used during training to help the novice pilots understand where they were going wrong, and could be strapped to airframes that otherwise couldn’t be used. The Germans used such devices, which could be mounted internally where there was space, or externally on smaller airframes. These sets depict the Zeiss ESK 2000B camera, which was mounted in an aerodynamic bullet fairing, and attached to the airframe by a mounting plate. Due to the limited space available only a small amount of film could be stored in a cartridge within the fairing, so the operation of the mechanism was synchronised with the pilot’s thumb on the trigger in an attempt to catch the action, which didn’t always work out 100% due to the erratic movements in dog-fighting - even in training. This arrives in the new Orange themed blister pack for the 3D Print range from Special Hobby, with a header card and instructions behind, completing the package. This is quite possibly the smallest item this reviewer has reviewed, however the details is pretty spot on. This is exactly the type of thing the new 3D printing excels at. You can find the location for many of the aircraft that used it with a quick Google, but CMK have included a drawing for the Bf.109E on the instructions for both sets, even down to the location where the control wire enters the wing at a nearby maintenance hatchway. Conclusion An unusual and interesting addition to any WWII German fighter that is incredibly well-detailed, and starts to add a back-story to your latest project. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. This is a newish release from Resin Scales, a Singapore based comany who produce direct 3D print kits of tanks from the World of Tanks game. The subject is 'what-if' of course, but it's essentially a double barreled IS-3. It's probably stretching it a bit to call it a kit in truth, as there are only five main parts. Both the hull and turret are printed as single pieces, and the tracks are also single units with the wheels, idlers, and sprockets printed integrally with each track run. The detail in some areas is very high, with even the cables for the lights being printed, but in other areas the 3D design is quite rudimentary. The running gear in particular is very basic with faceted edges on parts that should be rounded - you might almost suspect that they've pulled game assets to use for the 3D model To spice up the model a little more I added the mesh armour panels, and the stowage and fuel tank on the back. I also had to do a little printing myself since the mounting ring for the Dushka was warped from the kit's packaging and needed replacing, and I also needed to print out the support brackets for the fuel drum. Overall it built into a nice model, and it was an interesting project as this was the first off-the-shelf 3D printed kit I've tackled. Thanks for looking Andy
  14. Another 3D printed Gonk droid, this time a four legged version. A few quad Gonks have appeared over the years in various corners of the Star Wars expanded universe, although never on screen to my knowledge. Those ones tend to look like regular Gonks, but with four legs. For this one though, I wanted to create my own design with a more modern, industrial aesthetic, while still looking like something that could have come from the films - hopefully I've got somewhere close to that. This should have been sporting the emblem of the Mining Guild (A faction in the Star Wars universe), but I was unable to find anyone who could print the required decals, so that will have to wait for a future build. Unlike the last Gonk I build (PT-1N can be found here), this one is almost entirely 3D printed, with just the legs, rear panel, cables, and eye lens coming form other sources. The full build can be seen here And finally, a few shots with some of my other droids Thanks for looking Andy
  15. The latest droid to add to my ever growing collection, this is an EG-6 Power Droid, or 'Gonk'. They're a fairly common sight throughout the films and TV shows, although PT-1N here isn't based on any particular one. He's mainly constructed from 3D printed parts for the larger components, with some traditional kit bashing used for the details. It was a huge amount of fun to essentially design and manufacture my own kit, and I'll cetainly be doing more printed droid models in the future. The full build can be found here for anyone interested. Finally, here's a few comparison shots with my previous Gonk, DN-LD, who was built from a JPG resin kit, and one last shot with R-33K who was loitering around the photo booth. Thankd for looking Andy
  16. There seems to be something of a Mando figurefest happening on BM at the moment with @Hunter Rose's excellent looking Mando figure, and @rockpopandchips's equally cool Mando and Child already in progress. I thought I'd join in the fun with a figure I've recently printed of Grogu. The original file is from CG Trader, and is a very nice sculp, and conveniently scaled too as the default size for the print is 100mm to the top of the head meaning it can be easily scaled down to whatever size you need. I printed this one at 50%, so it's about 50mm high making it roughly 1/7 scale. I'll probably print another to 1/12, which would need to be around 28mm. It's a four part print consisting of the body and arms, the head, and the left and right hands. At this size I could fit everything onto the build plate which cut down on print time. I printed it with a 0.05mm layer hight for speed, so the print lines are a little more prominent than they would be If I'd used my normal 0.025 layer hight, but it still looks pretty good. Dry fitted, the sculpt does a good job of capturing the look of Grogu in the show. There's some nice texture on the fleece collar and cuffs, and good definition on the face. I spent some time cleaning up the marks left form the print supports from the neck and underside of the head, only to realise that they'd be completely hidden by the collar anyway. I've made an initial start on painting the body after priming the parts with Mr Surfacer 1000. The cloth parts had a base coat of Khaki, followed by some highlighting along the folds on the cloth with Deck Tan. The shadows were then deepened with a darker shade mixed from Khaki and NATO Brown. The collar and cuffs are straight Deck Tan. I then went over the base coats with some acrylic glazes to give more definition and darken the shadows further. You can see how some of the glazes have seeped into the print lines around the front flap of the tunic, but that doesn't bother me too much as it just looks like the weave texture of the fabric. Next job will be to lay down a base coat for the skin, once I've found a suitable green tone. Andy
  17. Hello everyone, I am teaching myself to use CAD and I thought "what better way to put anything I learn into practice than with a WiP?". I have chosen a couple of subjects to practice with, namely a military low-bed trailer, which is part of another ongoing WiP, and this Leyland Hippo 6x4 10 ton truck. I shall start with the chassis, as I have been able to find and download a good set of plans from the Mick Bell archives. To start with, I uploaded the plan into Fusion 360, as a canvas template, and then resized it to 1:144 scale. Following that, I was able to start drawing the chassis frame. Then, I was able to add some of the cross-frame supports. Note that I am only drawing half of the chassis, doing this has two benefits for me: - it save time as I will make a mirror copy once I have completed the drawing and match it over to the other side to make a complete chassis. - I find it difficult to draw identical lines and curves for each side of a drawing, this method helps to eliminate such errors. Next to go on the drawing are the suspension and drive-unit components. Please excuse my lack of the correct terminology, I know very little about vehicles. Here we have the front leaf springs and the two differential units, plus supporting brackets The petrol tank is situated on this side of the chassis so that was next to be drawn up. And this is where I have managed to get to so far. All the components described above have been brought together. I shall spend a little time working out what else is needed and where etc., although the prop shafts will probably be my next task. Some areas still have me befuddled, such as the two items just inside the front wheels on the bottom left image of the diagram I am using. Thanks for looking. Mike
  18. Here's my 1/144 Zvezda Ilyushin Il-76, converted to an Il-76LL engine testbed. The test engine is the Aviadvigatel PD-14 intended for the Irkut MC-21 and was 3D printed and decals for the Gromov Flight Research Institute were custom printed. You don't seem to see a lot of the Zvezda Il-76 kits built which is a shame, it's an interesting aircraft. I've seen others comment that it's over-engineered - perhaps it's not as simple as many 1/144 kits, but it's a nice kit and I enjoyed it. Build thread is here. I have another Il-76MD kit and a Beriev A-50 in the stash. Might have to have a go at an Il-976SKIP next. thanks for looking Julian
  19. I've had my current 3d printer for around 6 months & have now got it tuned to the point that I feel confident to tackle a large project. I'm going to try to build a model of Discovery - the deeps space ship that appears in 2001 A Space Odyssey. I found the 3d model on thingiverse https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:950664 The scale is approximately 160:1 & when built is should measure just over a metre long. The printer is a Geeetech A10 & I'm using Eryone PLA filament. The first parts I've printed are the engines & a handful of the pods that make up the long section of the body. I guess that it's going to take me to the end of next month to print all the parts & I hope to have the whole thing complete before the end of the year. Here's a picture of the first few bits:
  20. Hello everyone! Last year I completed a build of three Fine Molds 1/72 X-Wings (one of them being a rescue after a botched attempt from my teen years) as Red-2, Red-3 and Red-5. Given that Fine Molds provide extra parts for a landed version with an open canopy and extra decals to build several markings, I had a lot of spare parts, even after using some in my rescue of poor old Red-2. With such a large pile of parts and decals available I decided they shouldn't go to waste and decided to try and build yet another one, the caveat - this one is mostly 3d printed on my cheap, sub-$200 FDM Tevo Michelangelo printer! I know there's a lot of debate if 3d printing scale models is possible and given the entry-level equipment I have, I hope I can prove resoundingly yes. It won't hold to scrutiny at a very close inspection compared to Bandai or Fine Molds' fantastic kits, nor win a contest, but as something to sit nicely on the shelf it would do. A big, big thank you to the creator of the absolutely fantastic 3d models I am using for this print - 1/24 X-wing by Simhopp and Cockpit and pilot for 1/24 X-Wing by Simhopp! They're free, to boot! Scaled down to 33.3% it's very close in size to the Fine Molds kit; however, to exactly match the spare parts I had to resize the wings with some changes to their STL files. At 33.3% the main fuselage (comprised of four main sections) is about 2.5mm shorter than the FM kit with the rear section being just a tad shorter; barely noticeable even if they're side by side but if you want the exact length, print the forward fuselage halves at 34.3% and the rear at 35.5%. I printed the main parts from white PLA and then switched for the gun barrels to a sturdier white PET using a 0.2mm nozzle at mostly 0.1mm layer height. As I assembled the trio in flying mode, this one will be landed in a mini diorama displaying Red Leader. What I'll be using from the FM kit as spares will be: clear canopy (in fact, the spare one from my oldest kit, after polishing it with Tamiya polishing compound) top engine covers engine nozzles (short versions; what remained as spares) landing gears spare pilot figures and R2 droids The main parts printed and assembled: Engines with nozzles as test assembly: Gun barrels: Pilot figure; yes, it's 1/72 and 3d printed! Photo taken before I painted the helmet using Red Leader's markings: Panel line scribing details; not only am I not great at scribing but PLA is porous and keeping an even line is quite difficult... The first couple coats of primer revealed tons of impurities in the print. Tedious amounts of sanding, rescribing, repriming, and then some more all over again, followed. I'll spare you photos, it was boring and the kit is still waiting for a final primer coat. There are still numerous small detail issues I am not fully satisfied with but at this point it's about equal in detail level with the quality of pre-2010s Eastern Europe garage kits that I grew up with, so I guess it will do!
  21. Just Finished..... La Charra, 1/10 Bust sculpted by CreepyTables, painted in Scale 75 acrylics and FW inks Thanks for looking Sean
  22. Orange Goblin Bust, 1/10 scale or there abouts..... 3D print of a free STL file from Thingiverse. Painted in my usual Scale 75 Artists Acrylic and FW inks, personal challenge of using no white or black, substitutes of mixed Chromatic black and Scale75 Pale flesh Thanks for looking Sean
  23. Honestly, I planned 2021 as my "Russian AFV year", but the summer T-34 STGB temptation turned out to be too strong. So I opened this can of worms and after the T-34/76 and SU-100 I decided to include the smallest AFV from my stash into my 2020 schedule. The 1932 prototype was the most numerous tankette in history – some 3,340 were built according to the Russian sources. Being a slightly scaled-up variant of the Vickers Carden-Loyd Mark VI tankette (licence-built by the Soviets in 1930-31) it was just 8’7” long, or 17 inches shorter than the Issigonis' 1959 Morris Mini-Minor. Powered by the 40 hp GAZ AA (nee Ford Model A) 4-cylinder petrol engine and armed with a single Degtyaryov DT 0.3” MG, this tiny vehicle weighed roughly 2,700 kg. The Carden-Loyd tankettes were also licence-built in Italy, Japan, Poland and Czechoslovakia – a total of 8,000+ (including their derivatives) were manufactured. Moreover, Britain’s ubiquitous WW2 Universal Carrier (a.k.a. Bren Carrier, nearly 115,000 built) was also loosely based on the Mark VI tankette. The Soviet T-27s underwent their baptism of fire during the 1932 anti-Soviet Basmachi revolt in Turkestan and Kazakhstan – however, the fight against the guerilla cavalry units was certainly an assymetric warfare. In the mid-1930s the T-27 became the first AFV of the Soviet airborne units, carried (suspended on the special craddle) under the belly of the Tupolev TB-3 four-engined aircraft, widely used to drop paratroopers, too. The T-27s then participated in the 1939 invasions of Poland (September) and Finnland (December), in both cases fighting against their almost-siblings (Polish TK3 and TKS, Finnish Carden-Loyds) and in both cases suffering severely, simply sinking into the marshy terrain due to their extremely narrow tracks. Retired in May 1941 they were relegated to the prime-mover role. Some 1,800 T-27s were still used for towing the 45 mm AT guns and infantry mortars during the German Barbarossa attack. Unfortunately there is neither styrene nor resin T-27 kit in Braille scale yet. So when I found one in the Shapeways catalogue (when ordering some dozens of the 1/700 aircraft for my Cold War era aircraft carriers) the decision was simple and the model arrived from Holland in a week or so. The 3D-printed model is a single-piece affair, so it was made OOB except for closing the hull bottom and drilling the gun muzzle and the exhaust. The modelled T-27 belonged to the Soviet RKKA 123rd Infantry Division, which invaded Finnland in December 1939. It sports the standard camouflage of the 4BO Protective Green overall with some 2” wide white band around the casemate roof. The paint is (as always) Humbrol enamel – in this case #86 for the 1935-40 period 4BO, painted with a brush. The only decal needed was the aforementioned thin white stripe – courtesy of my drawer. Thereafter the Vallejo acrylic matt varnish was brush-applied overall, too. The pictures are taken with an LG smartphone. This last one shows the vehicle in the misty polar night circumstances, typical of the Arctic Circle area in December Comments welcome Cheers Michael
  24. Another model has reached escape velocity from my project thread The Fairey Delta 3 or Fairey Large was a proposal which came fairly close to being ordered as an interceptor for the RAF to the F.155 requirement but sadly wasn’t to be. Drawn up in Fusion 360. 3D printed (FDM printed in PLA plastic on a Creality Ender 3 Pro) and finished as per a normal kit plane with conventional fillers, paints and decals. Not as nice a finish as you’d get from a resin printer but good enough to get a sense of the size and shape of it. I’ll refine this and do another better version in due course.
  25. The very first Kliment Voroshilov tank, tested in the winter war of 1939-40 on one of my usual mini vignette bases.
×
×
  • Create New...