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  1. There seems to be something of a Mando figurefest happening on BM at the moment with @Hunter Rose's excellent looking Mando figure, and @rockpopandchips's equally cool Mando and Child already in progress. I thought I'd join in the fun with a figure I've recently printed of Grogu. The original file is from CG Trader, and is a very nice sculp, and conveniently scaled too as the default size for the print is 100mm to the top of the head meaning it can be easily scaled down to whatever size you need. I printed this one at 50%, so it's about 50mm high making it roughly 1/7 scale. I'll probably print another to 1/12, which would need to be around 28mm. It's a four part print consisting of the body and arms, the head, and the left and right hands. At this size I could fit everything onto the build plate which cut down on print time. I printed it with a 0.05mm layer hight for speed, so the print lines are a little more prominent than they would be If I'd used my normal 0.025 layer hight, but it still looks pretty good. Dry fitted, the sculpt does a good job of capturing the look of Grogu in the show. There's some nice texture on the fleece collar and cuffs, and good definition on the face. I spent some time cleaning up the marks left form the print supports from the neck and underside of the head, only to realise that they'd be completely hidden by the collar anyway. I've made an initial start on painting the body after priming the parts with Mr Surfacer 1000. The cloth parts had a base coat of Khaki, followed by some highlighting along the folds on the cloth with Deck Tan. The shadows were then deepened with a darker shade mixed from Khaki and NATO Brown. The collar and cuffs are straight Deck Tan. I then went over the base coats with some acrylic glazes to give more definition and darken the shadows further. You can see how some of the glazes have seeped into the print lines around the front flap of the tunic, but that doesn't bother me too much as it just looks like the weave texture of the fabric. Next job will be to lay down a base coat for the skin, once I've found a suitable green tone. Andy
  2. Hello Something unusual. On the cgtrader website I found a RoboCop Cain model for 3D printing. The model is scaled to a scale of 1: 6. It is designed as a puppet for time-lapse photos (inspired by the original models used for FX effects during filming). The model contains instructions in PDF format. I took some shortcuts. It will be a static model and reduced to a scale of 1: 8 ( about 32 cm high). This will make assembly a little easier, and secondly my printer will not print such large elements. A few photos of the beginning of the project:
  3. The latest droid to add to my ever growing collection, this is an EG-6 Power Droid, or 'Gonk'. They're a fairly common sight throughout the films and TV shows, although PT-1N here isn't based on any particular one. He's mainly constructed from 3D printed parts for the larger components, with some traditional kit bashing used for the details. It was a huge amount of fun to essentially design and manufacture my own kit, and I'll cetainly be doing more printed droid models in the future. The full build can be found here for anyone interested. Finally, here's a few comparison shots with my previous Gonk, DN-LD, who was built from a JPG resin kit, and one last shot with R-33K who was loitering around the photo booth. Thankd for looking Andy
  4. Here's my 1/144 Zvezda Ilyushin Il-76, converted to an Il-76LL engine testbed. The test engine is the Aviadvigatel PD-14 intended for the Irkut MC-21 and was 3D printed and decals for the Gromov Flight Research Institute were custom printed. You don't seem to see a lot of the Zvezda Il-76 kits built which is a shame, it's an interesting aircraft. I've seen others comment that it's over-engineered - perhaps it's not as simple as many 1/144 kits, but it's a nice kit and I enjoyed it. Build thread is here. I have another Il-76MD kit and a Beriev A-50 in the stash. Might have to have a go at an Il-976SKIP next. thanks for looking Julian
  5. I've had my current 3d printer for around 6 months & have now got it tuned to the point that I feel confident to tackle a large project. I'm going to try to build a model of Discovery - the deeps space ship that appears in 2001 A Space Odyssey. I found the 3d model on thingiverse https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:950664 The scale is approximately 160:1 & when built is should measure just over a metre long. The printer is a Geeetech A10 & I'm using Eryone PLA filament. The first parts I've printed are the engines & a handful of the pods that make up the long section of the body. I guess that it's going to take me to the end of next month to print all the parts & I hope to have the whole thing complete before the end of the year. Here's a picture of the first few bits:
  6. Hello everyone! Last year I completed a build of three Fine Molds 1/72 X-Wings (one of them being a rescue after a botched attempt from my teen years) as Red-2, Red-3 and Red-5. Given that Fine Molds provide extra parts for a landed version with an open canopy and extra decals to build several markings, I had a lot of spare parts, even after using some in my rescue of poor old Red-2. With such a large pile of parts and decals available I decided they shouldn't go to waste and decided to try and build yet another one, the caveat - this one is mostly 3d printed on my cheap, sub-$200 FDM Tevo Michelangelo printer! I know there's a lot of debate if 3d printing scale models is possible and given the entry-level equipment I have, I hope I can prove resoundingly yes. It won't hold to scrutiny at a very close inspection compared to Bandai or Fine Molds' fantastic kits, nor win a contest, but as something to sit nicely on the shelf it would do. A big, big thank you to the creator of the absolutely fantastic 3d models I am using for this print - 1/24 X-wing by Simhopp and Cockpit and pilot for 1/24 X-Wing by Simhopp! They're free, to boot! Scaled down to 33.3% it's very close in size to the Fine Molds kit; however, to exactly match the spare parts I had to resize the wings with some changes to their STL files. At 33.3% the main fuselage (comprised of four main sections) is about 2.5mm shorter than the FM kit with the rear section being just a tad shorter; barely noticeable even if they're side by side but if you want the exact length, print the forward fuselage halves at 34.3% and the rear at 35.5%. I printed the main parts from white PLA and then switched for the gun barrels to a sturdier white PET using a 0.2mm nozzle at mostly 0.1mm layer height. As I assembled the trio in flying mode, this one will be landed in a mini diorama displaying Red Leader. What I'll be using from the FM kit as spares will be: clear canopy (in fact, the spare one from my oldest kit, after polishing it with Tamiya polishing compound) top engine covers engine nozzles (short versions; what remained as spares) landing gears spare pilot figures and R2 droids The main parts printed and assembled: Engines with nozzles as test assembly: Gun barrels: Pilot figure; yes, it's 1/72 and 3d printed! Photo taken before I painted the helmet using Red Leader's markings: Panel line scribing details; not only am I not great at scribing but PLA is porous and keeping an even line is quite difficult... The first couple coats of primer revealed tons of impurities in the print. Tedious amounts of sanding, rescribing, repriming, and then some more all over again, followed. I'll spare you photos, it was boring and the kit is still waiting for a final primer coat. There are still numerous small detail issues I am not fully satisfied with but at this point it's about equal in detail level with the quality of pre-2010s Eastern Europe garage kits that I grew up with, so I guess it will do!
  7. Just Finished..... La Charra, 1/10 Bust sculpted by CreepyTables, painted in Scale 75 acrylics and FW inks Thanks for looking Sean
  8. Hello everyone, I am teaching myself to use CAD and I thought "what better way to put anything I learn into practice than with a WiP?". I have chosen a couple of subjects to practice with, namely a military low-bed trailer, which is part of another ongoing WiP, and this Leyland Hippo 6x4 10 ton truck. I shall start with the chassis, as I have been able to find and download a good set of plans from the Mick Bell archives. To start with, I uploaded the plan into Fusion 360, as a canvas template, and then resized it to 1:144 scale. Following that, I was able to start drawing the chassis frame. Then, I was able to add some of the cross-frame supports. Note that I am only drawing half of the chassis, doing this has two benefits for me: - it save time as I will make a mirror copy once I have completed the drawing and match it over to the other side to make a complete chassis. - I find it difficult to draw identical lines and curves for each side of a drawing, this method helps to eliminate such errors. Next to go on the drawing are the suspension and drive-unit components. Please excuse my lack of the correct terminology, I know very little about vehicles. Here we have the front leaf springs and the two differential units, plus supporting brackets The petrol tank is situated on this side of the chassis so that was next to be drawn up. And this is where I have managed to get to so far. All the components described above have been brought together. I shall spend a little time working out what else is needed and where etc., although the prop shafts will probably be my next task. Some areas still have me befuddled, such as the two items just inside the front wheels on the bottom left image of the diagram I am using. Thanks for looking. Mike
  9. Orange Goblin Bust, 1/10 scale or there abouts..... 3D print of a free STL file from Thingiverse. Painted in my usual Scale 75 Artists Acrylic and FW inks, personal challenge of using no white or black, substitutes of mixed Chromatic black and Scale75 Pale flesh Thanks for looking Sean
  10. Honestly, I planned 2021 as my "Russian AFV year", but the summer T-34 STGB temptation turned out to be too strong. So I opened this can of worms and after the T-34/76 and SU-100 I decided to include the smallest AFV from my stash into my 2020 schedule. The 1932 prototype was the most numerous tankette in history – some 3,340 were built according to the Russian sources. Being a slightly scaled-up variant of the Vickers Carden-Loyd Mark VI tankette (licence-built by the Soviets in 1930-31) it was just 8’7” long, or 17 inches shorter than the Issigonis' 1959 Morris Mini-Minor. Powered by the 40 hp GAZ AA (nee Ford Model A) 4-cylinder petrol engine and armed with a single Degtyaryov DT 0.3” MG, this tiny vehicle weighed roughly 2,700 kg. The Carden-Loyd tankettes were also licence-built in Italy, Japan, Poland and Czechoslovakia – a total of 8,000+ (including their derivatives) were manufactured. Moreover, Britain’s ubiquitous WW2 Universal Carrier (a.k.a. Bren Carrier, nearly 115,000 built) was also loosely based on the Mark VI tankette. The Soviet T-27s underwent their baptism of fire during the 1932 anti-Soviet Basmachi revolt in Turkestan and Kazakhstan – however, the fight against the guerilla cavalry units was certainly an assymetric warfare. In the mid-1930s the T-27 became the first AFV of the Soviet airborne units, carried (suspended on the special craddle) under the belly of the Tupolev TB-3 four-engined aircraft, widely used to drop paratroopers, too. The T-27s then participated in the 1939 invasions of Poland (September) and Finnland (December), in both cases fighting against their almost-siblings (Polish TK3 and TKS, Finnish Carden-Loyds) and in both cases suffering severely, simply sinking into the marshy terrain due to their extremely narrow tracks. Retired in May 1941 they were relegated to the prime-mover role. Some 1,800 T-27s were still used for towing the 45 mm AT guns and infantry mortars during the German Barbarossa attack. Unfortunately there is neither styrene nor resin T-27 kit in Braille scale yet. So when I found one in the Shapeways catalogue (when ordering some dozens of the 1/700 aircraft for my Cold War era aircraft carriers) the decision was simple and the model arrived from Holland in a week or so. The 3D-printed model is a single-piece affair, so it was made OOB except for closing the hull bottom and drilling the gun muzzle and the exhaust. The modelled T-27 belonged to the Soviet RKKA 123rd Infantry Division, which invaded Finnland in December 1939. It sports the standard camouflage of the 4BO Protective Green overall with some 2” wide white band around the casemate roof. The paint is (as always) Humbrol enamel – in this case #86 for the 1935-40 period 4BO, painted with a brush. The only decal needed was the aforementioned thin white stripe – courtesy of my drawer. Thereafter the Vallejo acrylic matt varnish was brush-applied overall, too. The pictures are taken with an LG smartphone. This last one shows the vehicle in the misty polar night circumstances, typical of the Arctic Circle area in December Comments welcome Cheers Michael
  11. Another model has reached escape velocity from my project thread The Fairey Delta 3 or Fairey Large was a proposal which came fairly close to being ordered as an interceptor for the RAF to the F.155 requirement but sadly wasn’t to be. Drawn up in Fusion 360. 3D printed (FDM printed in PLA plastic on a Creality Ender 3 Pro) and finished as per a normal kit plane with conventional fillers, paints and decals. Not as nice a finish as you’d get from a resin printer but good enough to get a sense of the size and shape of it. I’ll refine this and do another better version in due course.
  12. The very first Kliment Voroshilov tank, tested in the winter war of 1939-40 on one of my usual mini vignette bases.
  13. Evening all, A Quick and dirty paint job of a free 3D print from Thingiverse, done during my lunch half hours, 4 in total, all painted in Scale 75 Acrylics and FW inks Thanks for looking Sean
  14. Evening all, Latest off the paint station...... 28mm Jester from the Archvillain Games Circus Grotesque D&D Patreon I subscribe to, 3D printed This is my entry into their monthly competition, wish me luck..... Thanks for looking Sean
  15. EL-5A Mouse Droid 1/12 3D Print I've recently bought a 3D printer (Elegoo Mars Pro), and have been slowly finding my feet with that and Fusion 360. I wanted something fairly simple as an initial print, and there's very little that's simpler than Nigel. He objected to a digital doppelganger though, so this initial print has become EL-5A who's now betrothed to Nigel in some kind of weird mouse droid arranged marriage. The print came out fairly well, although there are some things I need to tweak, both with the printing and with the original file. The upper body was done at 0.05mm layer hight, while everything else was done at 0.025mm, and there's a marked difference as you'd expect, so I'll be trying the body again at the higher rez. The one thing I wasn't sure would come out okay was the top greebles. I didn't know if my design would be beyond the printer's capabilities. As it turned out, they printed fine and are the bits of this model I'm most pleased with. They certainly showed just what the printer is capable of. She's not as heavily weathered as Nigel, which seemed only fair, and she's had the white stripes to reference her name and her status as the future bride of Nigel. Since I'd got the basic file for the body, I also printed up two more without the side panel details, so I could make up the Mouse train that was originaly envisaged for ANH, but never used on screen due to the unpredictability and general uselessness of all Mouse Droids. EL-5A, being an all-round better class of rodent, can handle them easily. Thanks for looking Andy
  16. I thought I would share some progress on a current side project... First I should explain that as co-designer of a prototype Human Mk 1 – currently at early testing stages, a long way off even taxiing, mainly focussed on the exhaust system at present – I am limited to 10 minute essential dashes into the attic, so my conventional modelling is basically on hold. However between 5.30 and 7.30am I do have a window where I can combine infant care with some laptop action, and have been developing some planes on CAD for DLP resin printing. I find it strange that there are not more single engine GA aircraft available in kit form in 1:72. Yes you can get things like the Bulldog or Chipmunk, but even the Cessna 172 I think is limited to one hard to find resin issue. I guess that the people that dig these planes are those that fly them, and have neither the time nor the inclination to bother with them in model form. But they are such ubiquitous aircraft, and fly over us all the time. I’ve been tinkering with quite a few, but here is the Grumman AA-5 Traveler: Because of the print area of machines like the Elegoo Mars, my trusty steed, these sizes of planes work well, anything bigger would have to be highly modular. In this case, I can break it down into fuselage, wings, prop and wheels. As a print, I am quite pleased. The resin is standard Elegoo grey, printed in 0.02mm layers with a 8 sec per layer exposure. The layer lines are still visible, of course, but not nearly as obvious as they would be with FDM printing: The fuselage is printed with supports on the bottom, which will obligate some finishing work: The wings are printed standing on their end – this makes the print rather tall, and long (ca. 14 hours) but means the finish is better. That said, the mating surface is not quite square, so there may be some sagging going on: Details can be done, but as a lessons learnt prototype, I will resolve to increase the size of panel lines, as these luggage doors barely register and will disappear with sanding: Also, I have printed the horizontal stabilisers and fuselage as one, but there seems to be a tendency for these to warp (I have seen this on other models), so will probably benefit from separation: There is also the matter of transparencies. I have been trying to print these too, using Monocure clear resin. These of course have layer lines too, which is not ideal for transparency. This isn't from the Traveler, but shows a part straight out of the printer after clean up with IPA: One possible solution is to brush with extra resin and expose to more UV (a nail gel lamp): A smoother finish, but some manual polishing will definitely be required. I am comforted however by a Mach 2 clear part I have to hand – I am just about at Mach 2 clarity! Also, I think those lumps in the surface are doobreys that found there way onto the part, so general modelling hygiene is a must. As I say, I'm working on a few, really as a learning curve. Here is a Cessna 152 (yes I know there's a resin kit on the way!) All in all, exciting experimentations with learning points and a bit of an insight into the realities for those that actually design proper model kits. My hat is permanently doffed in their general direction! Circumstances dictate that I probably won't be sprinting to a quick RFI (poor form for a 9cm long model!) but I hope some of the above is of interest. There'll certainly be a reprint so if any eagle eyed Grumman afficianados spot any doosies do let me know, I am aware the top of the cowling is too flat. All best, Harry
  17. I have been pondering this whole drydock idea for quite a while now, so this is as much a KUTA for me as it is a build blog. It won't be fast: I'm back at work, and that means little free time for a while, but I'll keep working on it whenever I can. So the specifics: I have a Tamiya 1/350 KGV with a Big Ed PE kit (so much brass!), and thanks to fellow member and all-round good mate AndyP, I now have a Trumpeter Warspite to play with. Originally I planned just to have the King George in Drydock, looking all messy and tired at the end of a long spell at sea. All of the buildings and fittings will be 3D printed with FDM being used for large components and resin for the small stuff. With the addition of Warspite, I have decided to make it a bigger diorama, so I now need to make a sea wall on the outside, so much 3d sculpting will be needed for that, so ZBrush will become my friend in the near future... So here's where we are so far. kuta_render by DaTinz, on Flickr dock_render by DaTinz, on Flickr The models were made in 3ds Max. I usually use Maya, but I tend to get better quality STL exports from Max. I am not using Fusion because I usually need an in-built UV map what will literally allow me to sculpt detail into the surface, so bricks, rivets, etc. The components were modelled seperately, with the main dock structure being printed on my trusty Anycubic Mega-S, and the stair sections on my Photon resin printer. An Ikea picture frame made the ultimate sacrifice for the base, and I got my print on! boat2 (2) by DaTinz, on Flickr boat3 by DaTinz, on Flickr As you can see the print process wasn't entirely successful, but it works for me. I slapped some paint on and have put a really grungy wash on the surface ( don't worry, I will tidy it up a bit!) Here's the layout as planned: boat1 (2) by DaTinz, on Flickr boat4 (2) by DaTinz, on Flickr I have already started on the KGV, but she's been through a couple of moves, so she's a bit the worse for wear. Some of the railings have been crushed, so I will have to either print replacements or but some new railing PE. Also, the deck is lifting, so I may bite the bullet and remove it, clean up underneath it, and put a new one down. None of the superstructure is glued down, so disassembly will be easy. So that's where we are at right now. And yes, the steps really are that tiny. steps by DaTinz, on Flickr
  18. Out of the Box Models is crowdfunding a 1/72 3D-printed Yak-9T project; see here if interested: https://outoftheboxmodels.com/collections/crowdfunding-projects/products/crowdfunding-1-72-scale-yakovlev-yak-9t The goal is 20 preorders before the project goes ahead. John
  19. here you find a very interesting topic: from Iceman 29
  20. Hi BM'ers! I've been a little lacking in posts over here in recent years - bit tied up with moderating in another place that focuses on Large Scale Planes. However, I've recently acquired a copy of the 1:32 Hawker Siddeley Andover from Toshihiko of One Man Model in Japan and thought, being a British type, I really ought to share here too... Very occasionally you log on to the Interweb and spot something that immediatedly shouts 'what the...' Well, this was one of those moments. And it proceeded to create a 'disturbance in the force' - or at least my model building plans. Forum member Anthony Galbraith had spotted that Toshihiko, of 'One Man Model', was drawing up the Hawker Siddeley HS780 Andover C.Mk 1 with a view to 3D printing in 1:72 and 1:48 scales. Anthony asked if this could be printed in 1:32 and the intial answer was a no. However, a few weeks later the answer came back as a yes - and Anthony posted on the LSP forums asking if anyone else would be interested in a 1:32 print of the Andover. Two immediate positive responses - and a slightly delayed yes from me - subsequently followed up by a fifth - and the project was on! Oh, and beware, it's a fair size - here are the fuselage parts, taped together, compared to HK Models 1:32 B-17: I put together a review here. Plan is to build mine as a 115 Sqn E.Mk 3 from the mid/late '80s as we used to see them a lot in the skies over Oxfordshire. Back in a mo... Iain
  21. As per: Built as the ill fated WG236 using a donated 1/72 Novo FAW2 Sea Vixen revised by reshaping the cockpit, 3D printing a new nose, fuselage plug and parts of the booms. Few odds and sods of sanding, reshaping and scratching elsewhere. Decals cobbled together from spares
  22. Squirrelled away in the “They also serve” GB but repeating myself here as it is too interesting an oddity to not share widely Drawn in Fusion 360, printed in sections on Creality Ender 3 Pro and finished in a what-if scheme. Looking like something even Burt Rutan would consider a bit of a stretch
  23. “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch you must first invent the universe” so... starting from a couple of 3 view drawings and b&w artist’s impressions let’s see where they lead us
  24. Just a test run of a basic model so the decals are all from spares and I’ve left the serial off rather than waste my stock on a first try Designed in Fusion 360 and 3D printed
  25. My brother is a huge Star Wars fan and quite an accomplished cosplay crafter as well. For his 47th birthday, I'm creating a small First Order Stormtrooper bust for him. Since I'm still learning how to sculpt in Zbrush, I purchased a 3D model online and will be modifying it into a customized 3D printed model. The model I purchased features a classical sculptural base. It looks nice, but I have an idea for a base that features the First Order emblem. First, I created the base in my favorite NURBS modeler and added a 1cm hole in the center. The Aurubesh text is my brother's name and age. Next I turned to customizing the model in Zbrush. First, I trimmed off the original cylindrical base and add a 1cm wide post. The space between the helmet and the torso is pretty tight, so I separated the geometry at the neck and add a mounting post with a matching recess in the helmet. I tried to align the separation between the folds of the neck piece as best I could. Then I imported my custom base and checked the alignment digitally. Next, I sent the geometry to my Form 2 SLA printer and waited for nine hours for the print to complete. After an isopropyl alcohol bath to remove residual resin, the model parts were ready. Here are the parts still attached to their printing supports. I did a little clean up of the parts and put them together for quick test fit. Surfaces that have a gradual slope that ends in a horizontal surface tend to have faint stair step lines from the printing process, in this case they were 0.05mm layers for the model. The sanded portion on the top of the helm is where I lightly sanded the layer lines away. In the photo below, the horizontal lines that are visible are actually completely smooth. I'll be performing additional sanding and clean up in the morning, then onto priming and painting.
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