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Found 3 results

  1. Tempo A400 Lieferwagen Milk Delivery Van (38057) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd The A/E400 Lieferwagen was another of Hitler’s standard vehicles that is perhaps lesser known than the Beetle. It was produced by company Tempowerk Vidal & Sohn from 1938, and was joined by an identical Standard E-1 that was manufactured in another factory. It was one of the few factories that were permitted to carry on making civilian vehicles, although this permit was eventually withdrawn as the state of the war deteriorated for Germany. The wagon was a little unstable in the corners due to its single front wheel, and it had a front-mounted engine that probably made matters worse, with a chain drive from the motor to the wheel. The two-stroke 400cc engine in the standard E1 output 12 hp that gave it sluggish performance to say the least, which was probably just as well due to that front wheel. The milk delivery driver was situated behind the front wheel, with a pair of side doors for entry and exit, and a single-panel windscreen that overlooked the short, tapered bonnet/hood. The load area was to the rear of the vehicle that was integrated into the cab for this variant, with a single door on the side, and another pair of doors at the back to keep the contents safe and another load area on the roof inside a railed in portion, and with several other rear bodyshell designs available. The covered van was common, although flatbeds and other designs were available. The Kit This is a new variant of the recent tool from MiniArt, broadening the choice of body styles and uses again for the modeller. This unusual little vehicle arrives in a small top-opening box, and inside are ten sprues of varying sizes in grey styrene, eight sprues of clear bottles, eight sprues of milk crate parts in an orange styrene, a fret of Photo-Etch (PE) in a card envelope, a large and a small decal sheet and the instruction booklet on glossy paper with colour profiles on the front and rear pages. It’s a full-body model that shares its panels with the cab, so you’ll get to build all the internal parts and during the process possibly learn a little about how it works – I did when the first boxings came in. Detail is as good as we’ve come to expect from MiniArt, with a lot of it and it’s all very well-defined. Well considered use of slide-moulding also improves the detail without increasing the part count, and makes parts like the forward cowling a feast for the eyes. Construction begins with the small cab floor, which has a planked texture engraved on its surface, and is fitted out with foot pedals, a hand-brake lever and narrow cylindrical chassis rail down the centre, plus a battery attached to the floor on the left. The front bulkhead has a clear windscreen with rounded corners popped in with a small sliver of PE at the bottom, a short steering column and a L-shaped lever, with the windscreen wiper motor cover added to the top of the screen frame, cutting off the two bunny-ear indicators because they aren’t needed here for this version. The windscreen/bulkhead assembly is attached to the front of the floor with a pot for the washers and the conversion stub of the steering column, with a pair of PE wiper blades added in a boxed diagram later along with the latching-point for the bonnet. The padded bench seat for the crew is slotted into the floor, and the back is attached to the rear bulkhead that is joined to the floor, and you’ll need to find some 0.3mm wire 24.6mm long to represent the linkage to the floor-mounted brake lever and the back of the cockpit. The steering wheel and rear bulkhead are glued in, then the two crew doors a made up, having clear side windows plus winders and handles that are quite delicate for realism, making up the rear door with locking mechanism and handle ready for the building of the load area. This starts with the two side panels that have the aft door pillars moulded into the front and the mudguards for the rear wheels, plus a pair of bunny-ear indicators that are mounted on the B-pillar for this variant. The rear chassis is built around a cylindrical centreline rail with the back axle and its triangular bearers slipping over it and hubs with brake drums added at each end. A sturdy V-shaped brace is added between the ends of the axle and the other end of the cylindrical chassis rail, with a large retainer locating in a recess between them. The rear wheels are made from a main part that includes the contact surface of the tyres and back of the hub, with a choice of two inserts to represent two hub cap styles, that are then fitted onto the axles on short pegs, with a brake-line made from some more of your own 0.3mm wire and suspended from the frame on PE brackets that are folded over the wire and are closed up then glued to the frame with an etched-in rivet giving the impression that it is attached firmly to the chassis. The load bed floor is a single part with more planking and fixings engraved into both surfaces, adding clear lights into recesses in a rear valance and a number plate in the central recess. The floor is mated to the rear bulkhead of the cab, fixing an interior skin to the back of the bulkhead during the process. The load area sides have already been fitted with mudguards, and have a pair of interior skins added with supports for the racks moulded-in. As the two sides are glued to the edged of the floor, a set of optional rack stops are glued across between them, on the rear frame of the side entrance door. A shelf is slotted into the middle rack of the three, and another is inserted through the side door dropping the roof in from above, and fixing the pre-prepared back door and its single-part counterpart at the rear in open or closed positions, doing the same for the side door, which has the same locking mechanism and handle added, and the two rearward-hinging crew doors to the cab. The little engine is superbly detailed with a lot of parts representing the diminutive 400cc two-stroke motor and its ancillaries, including radiator, fuel tank, exhaust with silencer and chain-drive cover that leads to the front axle. The completed assembly comprises the motor, axle and the fork that attaches to the front of the cab and is wired in using three more lengths of 0.3mm wire from your own stocks, which the instructions advise you again makes you an experienced modeller. An easy way to earn that badge. After the rear axle and chassis tube have been fitted under the load bed and plugged into the rear of the cab, the slide-moulded cowling for the engine is fitted-out with a choice of two fine PE radiator meshes with layered Tempo badge, an internal deflector panel, PE numberplate, a pair of PE clasps on the lower rear edge of the bonnet, and a tiny hook on the top in between two rows of louvres. The cowling can be fixed in the closed position or depicted open to show off the engine, when the little hook latches onto the clip on the roof’s drip-rail, holding it up past vertical against the windscreen, as per the scrap diagram over the page. A pair of headlamps with clear lenses are fitted below the windscreen and a solitary wing mirror on an angled arm is glued to a hole in the front of the bulkhead below the windscreen frame, with a PE bracket giving the appearance of that the etched rivets are what holds it in place. The last job for the model itself is to fit the PE frame around the strengthened portion of the roof, bending the legs outward and locating them in small C-shaped cut-outs marked around the edges. This is a milk wagon, and parts are included to create eight narrow milk crates with a fine wooden texture engraved in the parts, and each one can accommodate ten bottles from the clear sprues, which depict empties unless you plan on painting some of them with creamy-white paint to portray milk in the bottles. There are also four different styles of milk churn included on the sprues, taking advantage of sliding moulds to create the body of the churns as one part each. Each one has a base fitted to the bottom, lid with PE handle on three of them, and moulded-in carry handles for one churn, adding different types to the others using separate parts. The milk crates are shown perched on the roof of the vehicle, with the churns invisible, but you can put them wherever you like, as it's your model. Markings There are six decal options from the sheet, all painted in one or more solid colours with a lot of white (it’s a milk wagon after all), and decorated with the markings of the owner’s brand, one having the large smiling face of a child drinking a glass of milk while a caption extolls its virtues. The painted logos, some of them realistically painted, are the main reason for the decals being screen-printed to achieve the depth of colour, especially for the child drinking a glass of milk, those being sited on the small additional sheet. From the box you can build one of the following: Provinz Westfalen, Late 1930s Austria, Late 1930s Berlin, Early 1940s Saarbrücken, 1950s Netherland, Early 1960s West Germany, Early 1960s All the decals are screen printed by Cartograf, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion These little three-wheelers must have been prolific in post-war Europe, and we must now have half-a-dozen boxings of the different variants now. This is the most modern-looking bodyshell, and the detail is excellent as usual. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. After being absent from the Airfix catalogue since its last release in 1975, the diminutive (in any scale) Bond Bug is back in the ranks, and is released now, complete with brand new re-engineered glazing components that should bring it right up to modern standards. History Could there have possibly been a more distinctive and eye-catching vehicle found on Britain’s roads than the Bond Bug? Marketed directly at a younger audience, the Bond Bug was desired as ‘The fun car that does a serious job’ and with its striking tangerine finish with black detailing, it was certainly very different to anything else on Britain’s roads. The idea behind the Bond Bug was to take the rather staid reputation of the three-wheeled vehicles produced in Britain after the war and give them a fun and sporty makeover, with the aim of attracting a sizeable, mainly younger purchasing audience in the process. The Bond Bug proved to be a motoring breath of fresh air with its futuristic, almost space-aged, wedge-shaped appearance and certainly grabbed the attention of anyone who saw one. Unfortunately, even though the Bond Bug was always viewed with great affection, sales success did not follow and after a relatively short production run, the last Bug left its Tamworth factory in May 1974. Since that date, the three-wheeler which was only available in tangerine, has become something of a motoring classic and restored examples are now highly prized. The Kit Ranked at skill level 1, the A02413V Bond Bug in 1:32 scale is born once again after the tools many years of rest, reinvigorating the Airfix range with its much-loved design and quirky features of its shape and size. Once complete, the kit measures an overall length of 90mm and 43mm in width, containing 64 pieces, including new clear parts which were reversed engineered to complete the kit. After the tooling was created in 1971, the Bond Bug was released once more within the 1975 Airfix range and from then on, it was nowhere to be seen… A kit that has been destined for revival; the Bond Bug excites scale modellers with its imminent return after a total of 48 years of absence from the Airfix range! Markings Orange. What more is there to say? New decals of course. We’ll be getting a sample for review shortly, so you should be able to read all about it in our Vehicle Review section soon Mike.
  3. Tempo E400 Kastenwagen 3-Wheel Delivery Box Truck (38047) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd The A/E400 Lieferwagen was another of Hitler’s standard vehicles that is perhaps lesser known than the Beetle. It was produced by company Tempowerk Vidal & Sohn from 1938, and was joined by an identical Standard E-1 that was manufactured in another factory. It was one of the few factories that were permitted to carry on making civilian vehicles, although this permit was eventually withdrawn as the state of the war deteriorated for Germany. The wagon was a little unstable in the corners due to its single front wheel, and it had a front-mounted engine that probably made matters worse, with a chain drive from the motor to the wheel. The two-stroke 400cc engine in the standard E1 output 12 hp that gave it sluggish performance to say the least, which was probably just as well due to that front wheel. The driver was situated behind the front wheel, with a pair of side doors for entry and exit, and a single-panel windscreen that overlooked the short, tapered bonnet/hood. The load area was to the rear of the vehicle, with a single door at the back to keep the contents safe and cool, and with several other rear bodyshell designs available. The covered van was common, although flatbeds and other designs were available. The Kit This is a new version of the recent tool from MiniArt, and has been released in parallel with the more militaristic A400, to give the modeller some choice. This unusual little vehicle arrives in a small top-opening box, and inside are seven sprues of varying sizes in grey styrene, a sprue of clear parts, a fret of Photo-Etch (PE) in a card envelope, a large and a small decal sheet and the instruction booklet on glossy paper with colour profiles on the front and rear pages. It’s a full-body model even though that body is small, so you’ll get to build all the internal parts and during the process possibly learn a little about how it works – I did. Detail is as good as we’ve come to expect from MiniArt, with a lot of it and what there is well-defined. Well considered use of slide-moulding also improves the detail without increasing the part count, and makes parts like the forward cowling a feast for the eyes. Construction begins with the small cab floor, which has a planked texture engraved on its surface, and is fitted out with foot pedals, a hand-brake lever and narrow cylindrical chassis rail, plus a battery attached to the floor on the left. The front bulkhead has a clear rounded windscreen popped in with a small sliver of PE at the bottom, a short steering column and a droopy lever, with the windscreen wiper motor cover added to the top of the screen frame, cutting off the two bunny-ear indicators because they aren’t suitable for this version. The windscreen/bulkhead assembly is attached to the front of the floor with a pot for the washers and the conversion stub of the steering column, with a pair of PE wiper blades added in a boxed diagram later along with the shackle for the bonnet. The padded bench seat for the crew is slotted into the floor, and the back is attached to the rear bulkhead that has two side parts and a small clear window for later joining to the floor, and you’ll need to find some 0.3mm wire 24.6mm long to represent the linkage to the floor-mounted brake lever and the back of the cockpit. The steering wheel and rear bulkhead are glued in, then the two crew doors a made up, having clear side windows plus winders and handles that are quite delicate for realism, then they are installed on the cab under the roof, remembering that they hinge rearward in the manner sometimes referred to as suicide doors. The rear chassis is built around a cylindrical centreline part with the back axle and its triangular bearers slipping over it and hubs with brake drums added at each end. A sturdy V-shaped brace is added between the ends of the axle and the other end of the cylindrical chassis rail, with a large joint between them. The rear wheels are made from a main part that includes the tyres and back of the hub, with a choice of two inserts slipped inside to represent two different hub cap styles, that are then fitted onto the axles on short pegs, with a brake-line made from some more of your own 0.3mm wire and suspended from the frame on PE brackets that are folded over the wire and are closed up then glued to the frame with an etched-in rivet giving the impression that it is attached firmly to the chassis, which makes you an advanced modeller. The load bed is a single part with more planking engraved into both surfaces, adding lights on a PE bracket before the box is made. The little engine is superbly detailed with a lot of parts representing the diminutive 400cc two-stroke motor and its ancillaries, including radiator, fuel tank, exhaust with silencer and chain-drive cover that leads to the front axle. The completed assembly comprises the motor, axle and the fork that attaches to the front of the cab and is wired in using three more lengths of 0.3mm wire from your own stocks, which the instructions advise you again makes you an experienced modeller. An easy way to earn that badge! The box is built up on the load bed floor, starting with the sides, then adding the ends and the curved roof, attaching the mudguards to the ribs on the sides, and a choice of number plate designs that fit on the back door, which has a handle opposite the hinges, as does the smaller side door on the right. After the rear axle and chassis tube have been fitted under the load bed and mated with the cab, the slide-moulded cowling for the engine is fitted-out with two fine PE radiator meshes, an internal deflector panel, PE numberplate, a pair of PE clasps on the lower rear edge of the bonnet, and a tiny hook on the top in between two rows of louvres. The cowling can be fixed in the closed position or depicted open to show off the engine, when the little hook latches onto the clip on the roof’s drip-rail, holding it up past vertical against the windscreen, as per the scrap diagram nearby. A couple of headlamps with clear lenses are fitted on the sides of the cowling and a solitary wing mirror on an angled arm is glued to hole in the front of the bulkhead above the windscreen frame, with a PE bracket giving the appearance of that the etched rivets are what holds it in place. Markings There are four decal options from the sheet, all painted in one or more solid colours and decorated with the markings of the brand of the owner, one having a large smiling face pointing to a pack of ersatz butter. From the box you can build one of the following: Nordland Schwarze Zigaretten, Germany, Stuttgart 1940s Bahlsen Keks, Germany, Hannover 1940s Fanella, Germany, Leipzig 1940s Scho-Ka-Kola, Germany, Berlin 1940s Decals are by Cartograf, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It’s weird, so of course like it, but MiniArt have also done a great job with making an easy to build, well-detailed kit of this quirky little German grandfather to the Robin Reliant. I guarantee there will be more of these coming soon. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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