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Pete M.

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About Pete M.

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    New Member
  • Birthday 12/08/1949

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    http://rnzaf.hobbyvista.com/
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    Male
  • Location
    Auckland, New Zealand

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  1. Yes, I'm still waiting for the 1:48 scale sets I pre-ordered and they are not replying to my queries on when and if they are going to materialise!
  2. And also on the framework of most of the Eduard PE sets! Heat up clear sprue and push it in then slice off.. Pete M.
  3. Hi CG. Are you aware of the correction needed to repostion the main undercarriage legs? It was discussed many times when the two AMT A20 kits were released (along with comments on those horrid tyres). From my files: A-20 undercarriage: "Those of you that wish to have your A-20G sitting on the ground may wish to correct its "sit" by drilling new main landing gear locator holes 1/4" (6.3mm) forward of the existing locator holes in the lower wings (24, 26). If the main landing gear is installed "by the book," it will sit too far back. Naturally, I caught this boo-boo after the fact, but that's what I'm here for - so you don't! It is such an easy fix that you really should take a minute to drill the new holes." On pg 7 of the erection and maintenance manual it says the axle of the main wheel is 4' 6" aft of the leading edge. (unknown quote off 'tinternet'). Most builders seem to agree on that given measurement. Cheers, Pete M.
  4. Pete M.

    Telford 2019

    Coming over again for my 7th visit..can't help with accomodation as for the past few visits I've stayed with a group of lads from IPMS Rotherham and IPMS Sheffield at an inn just south of Bridgenorth (). Looking forwards to catching up again with all my UK and Continental contacts. Pete M.
  5. I would like some too, but unfortunately, can't pack them in my bag to ship home to NZ!!!!
  6. While not in colour, the following photos of Marine PB1's were taken by a Kiwi pilot, Neville Jackson who did 3 tours with No.21 Squadron RNZAF. Copies via Dave Homewood and Kerry Carlyle. The Kiwis were usually called on to escort both US Army, Navy and Marine strikes on Rabaul and the surrounding areas. All are in the standard US Navy's 1944 '4-Tone' scheme. Hope these help and don't confuse any further! Cheers, Pete M.
  7. And just to confuse this question further, below is a sketch I have in my Mosquito files showing the Gee layout. From memory it came via John Adams with his notes pencilled in the margin. It shows the central unit as being the IFF unit. Some further notes from my files from an earlier discussion on this site regarding these same questions has the following: 48 of the earliest FB.VIs produced were fitted with T.1154B and R.1155 radio kit. In these a/c the transmitter and receiver units were mounted on the wing decking in the rear of the cockpit as depicted by most (all?) of the FB.VI kits, i.e. transmitter mounted centrally right at the back, and the receiver mounted sideways next to the observer's seat. Later aircraft were fitted with the same R.1155 receiver but the T.1143 transmitter instead. In those a/c the R.1155 was mounted centrally on the wing decking in the rear of the cockpit (where the T.1154 was in the early a/c) and the T.1143 mounted back in the fuselage just aft of bulkhead 4. These a/c were also fitted with GEE Mk.II (A.R.I. 5083), the receiver for which was mounted on the port side of the wing decking (where the R.1155 was in the early a/c) and the indicator unit behind the pilot's seat.
  8. Hi Jim. I was made redundant in June, and as I'm now 69 decided it was time to retire! Plenty of spare time to help out where I can on the various forums I haunt!!!! Revell have also simplified the cans a bit but they have got them closer to the real shapes than the 'boxes' that Tamiya gave us. Got a new battery for my digital calipers this morning so here are some measurements that may help further. Hope you can make sense of it with all the 'red lines'! Cheers, Pete M.
  9. Hi Jim. Unfortunately I can't help with the 1:1 measurements of the 20mm ammunition cans, but hope the pics below will help. I have included a photo of the cans from the Revell 1:48 kit. Slightly better than those Tamiya provided! Can't give you exact measurements as the battery in my digital calipers appears to have died! Cheers, Pete M. From the TFX manual From my files...sorry I have no credit listed for that one.
  10. Hi Rog. Looking again, and doing a Google search, It is a Viscount..it appears they had two diferent types of cabin door, an almost circular one that opened forwards, and a recangular one that opened to the rear. Caption now corrected. I'm not a civil aircraft modeller and have done very little research on them.
  11. Hi Rog. I don't think it's a Viscount as the tail fin is a different shape, and the rear door is opened forwards rather than to the rear as all the Viscounts. I'll have annother look at the original. Cheers, Pete M.
  12. Hi Steve. It's a Kogan KASCNCMB51B 5-in-1 combo scanner. They were selling on-line direct from Kogan at NZ$109.00 instead of the usual $199.00 from Dick Smith's etc. Only saves at 96dpi, but does the job. Can scan negatives, slides, photos etc. I'll see if I can find the original link. https://www.kogan.com/nz/buy/combo-scanner-5-1-B/?utm_campaign=postsaleorderconfirm&utm_medium=email&utm_source=kogan Now back to their normal $199.00 but comes up on special every couple of months! Cheers, Pete M.
  13. Hi to all. I have just purchased an 'el-cheapo' slide scanner, and have been going through my late Father's 35mm slides. Unfortunately the older ones were left for many years in an open box, and have suffered from exposure and dust. I have done a clean-up with iso alcohol that has got the worst of the muck off, but still not the greatest. These were all taken in 1958 when dad was sent by the RNZAF to do a course at Rolls Royce in Derby on the Avon engines that were fitted to the Canberra's we were about to receive. Film appears to be a mixture of Kodak and Agfa...the difference is very noticeable! The first lot appear to have been taken at one of the UK airports.... I'm sure one of you will be able to ID where it is? TWA Boeing 707, Avro York and Dakotas UK 1958. BOAC Comet UK 1958. BOAC Britannia UK 1958. Air France Caravelle UK 1958. Viscounts, Dakota and TU104 ? UK 1958. Air India Super Constellation UK 1958. TU104 UK 1958. Viscounts UK 1958. BOAC Comet and KLM Constellation Karachi 1958. RNZAF Hastings and RAAF Hercules, RAAF Amberly, Queensland 1958. My father was flying in the Hastings, so a long trip to the UK! RAAF Hercules, Darwin? 1958. RAF Transport Command Comet at Karachi 1958. And finally a domestic New Zealand NAC Viscount at Rongotai in Wellington circa 1959. Pete M.
  14. Yes. And were purchased by the 'Squadron Empire'. Some of their items have re-surfaced under the True Details line. Cheers, Pete M.
  15. Those old Aero Series listings are way off for the RNZAF's TBF's! We received 6 TBF-1's which were all retained in NZ for training as they were not considered suitable for operational use! Here is the listing and Bu.Numbers for these aircraft. NZ2501: Grumman const no.5211: TBF-1: Bu24328. Built as TBF-1, classed as TBF-1C by USN, but were sufficiently different for RNZAF not to use them on operations. Arrived in New Zealand on "William Keith". Assembled by No.1 Aircraft Depot Hobsonville and BOC 21 September 1943 with Unit 36, Hobsonville. Delivered to No.30 Squadron, Gisborne during October 1943. Sold from Rukuhia by GSB tender number 1705 dated 02 March 1948 to J. Larsen and scrapped at Rukuhia. NZ2502: 5215: TBF-1: Bu24332. Built as TBF-1, classed as TBF-1C by USN, but were sufficiently different for RNZAF not to use them on operations. Arrived in New Zealand on "William Keith". Assembled by No.1 Aircraft Depot Hobsonville and BOC 21 September 1943 with Unit 36, Hobsonville. Delivered to No.30 Squadron, Gisborne on 09 October 1943. Sold from Rukuhia by GSB tender number 1705 dated 02 March 1948 to J. Larsen and scrapped at Rukuhia. NZ2503: 5218: TBF-1: Bu24335. Built as TBF-1, classed as TBF-1C by USN, but were sufficiently different for RNZAF not to use them on operations. Arrived in New Zealand on "William Keith". Assembled by No.1 Aircraft Depot Hobsonville and BOC 21 September 1943 with Unit 36, Hobsonville. Delivered to No.30 Squadron, Gisborne during October 1943. Placed in long term storage after war. Removed from storage in March 1949 and allocated to the Research and Development Flight for topdressing trials. Positioned from Masterton to Whenuapai on 23 May 1949 at end of trials. To No.42 Squadron, Ohakea on 17 November 1949 for drogue towing. Crashed in Waitemata Harbour near Hobsonville on 15 March 1956 after engine failure. The aircraft was recovered but was later broken up and was written off the books at Hobsonville on 17 August 1956. NZ2504: 5219: TBF-1: Bu24336. Built as TBF-1, classed as TBF-1C by USN, but were sufficiently different for RNZAF not to use them on operations. Arrived in New Zealand on "William Keith". Assembled by No.1 Aircraft Depot Hobsonville and BOC 21 September 1943 with Unit 36, Hobsonville. Delivered to No.30 Squadron, Guisborne on 12 October 1943. To No.31 Squadron. Placed in long term storage after war. Removed from long term storage in June 1948 and flew again on 28 July of that year with the General Purpose Flight, Ohakea for use in topdressing trials. Positioned from Masterton to Whenuapai on 23 May 1949 at end of trials. To No.42 Squadron, Ohakea on 17 November 1949 for drogue towing. Final flight with RNZAF was made from Ohakea to Hamilton on 30 June 1959. Converted to instructional airframe INST182 on 10 July 1959 for use as gate guardian at RNZAF Base, Te Rapa. Remained painted as NZ2504 and never wore the INST serial. Recovered for RNZAF Museum in 1978 and now displayed as NZ2521 in No.31 Squadron wartime colour scheme. NZ2505: 5220: TBF-1: Bu24337. Built as TBF-1, classed as TBF-1C by USN, but were sufficiently different for RNZAF not to use them on operations. Arrived in New Zealand on "William Keith". Assembled by No.1 Aircraft Depot Hobsonville and BOC 21 September 1943 with Unit 36, Hobsonville. Delivered to No.30 Squadron, Gisborne prior to 09 October 1943, being their first Avenger. To No.31 Squadron. To No.42 Squadron. One of the last 3 Avengers on strength with the RNZAF. Sold by GSB tender number SR228/59 dated 23 September 1959 to Bennett Aviation, Te Kuiti. To children's playground at Opunake Beach by 1970. Removed from the park in 1972 for restoration by a group of private individuals. Later to the RNZAF Museum who were originally going to trade it to the Australian Fleet Air Arm Museum. Loaned to the Gisborne Aviation and Preservation Society in 1999 for restoration and display in Gisborne. Presently displayed at the museum in Gisborne. NZ2506: 5222: TBF-1: Bu24339. Built as TBF-1, classed as TBF-1C by USN, but were sufficiently different for RNZAF not to use them on operations. Arrived in New Zealand on "William Keith". Assembled by No.1 Aircraft Depot Hobsonville and BOC 21 September 1943 with Unit 36, Hobsonville. Delivered to No.30 Squadron, Gosborne on 20 October 1943. Placed in long term storage after war. Removed from storage in April 1949 and allocated to the Research and Development Flight for topdressing trials. Crashed on takeoff from Hood Aerodrome, Masterton on 03 May 1949, the first sortie of the trial. Written off books at Ohakea on 17 October 1949. Many of the later TBF-IC's were apparently from a FAA order, and arrived with full FAA roundels and from what I have seen of their remains, many also had the rudimentry flight controls in the second cockpit as below: (NZ2527 now on display at the Museum Of Transport And Technology-MOTAT). I was lucky enought do do a photo shoot on it many years ago when it was in the hands of what was then the NZ branch of the Confederate Air Force. It is now unknown whether they had the full FAA observer set-up in that middle cockpit! I also have yet to see a photo of one with the 'bulged' lower window as per the FAA TBF's so the modifications may not have been carried out before they were shipped from the USA. I have also re-posted a photo from the Grumman Archives showing the centre cockpit layout of the TBF-1, and the instruction sheet from the KMC conversion set that may help with building an FAA Avenger. The three lighter coloured units on the port side in front of the seat are the auto-pilot controls. On the US Navy TBF-1C's these are hidden under the shelf that carried the radar units as per the Accurate/Italeri kits. Naturally in the FAA TBF-'s this area would also contain the specific Royal Navy homing radios and navigation devices used in FAA aircraft...photos of this layout are still the 'Holy Grail' of modelling!!!! The original colour in this area is a very faded US Interior Green, not the Bronze Green that the TBF-1's were painted. Stangely enough, the internal bomb bay area IS Bronze Green!!!!!!! Hope this helps and not hinders. Cheers, Pete M. Pete M.
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