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Rob de Bie

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About Rob de Bie

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  1. Yes! That's what I tried to describe (clumsily) in words. Rob
  2. Found some more information: - Soesterberg had 18 first-generation TAB-Vs built in 1969. They had an inside width of 48' / 15.79 m. They were semi-circular, and had a one-piece door with a faceted 'bulge'. From earlier research I learned that this strange shape came about because the faceted bulge used to be the doors on the very earliest version (not built at Soesterberg). These doors were deep inside the shell, maybe 20% of the length of the shelter. To open inside a semi-circular shape, the required a strange shape. The whole of the inset wall plus doors was later placed at the front of the shelter, with everything welded together. - In 1975, 17 second-generation TAB-Vs were built, with a 71' / 21.58m inside width, and suited for the F-15. These were oval-shaped, and had two doors with heavy steel beam bracing. The aerial construction photos definitely show the first generation. Rob
  3. The inner tubes are steel, I've seen that up-close. I just found two photos, also from Soesterberg, but maybe a later-generation TAB-V: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AirBaseSoesterberg_Shelter610_02.jpg#/media/File:AirBaseSoesterberg_Shelter610_02.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AirBaseSoesterberg_Shelter610_04.jpg#/media/File:AirBaseSoesterberg_Shelter610_04.jpg The third photo in the 'NIMH Beeldbank' link that I posted above, right side, shows a lot of rebar for the rear wall, and a bit of rebar for the cilindrical shell. But I still cannot find any rebar in any of the ready-for-pouring photos. Rob
  4. I looked again at the photos, and to my surprise there is no steel reinforcement (rebar) visible before the concrete is poured. The pouring casings are already mostly installed, but no rebar. Yet in the one photo where the shelter's exhaust is missing, I see lots of rebar sticking out vertically. I'm confused Rob
  5. I just found a really nice set of construction photos of the TAB-Vs at Soesterberg: https://nimh-beeldbank.defensie.nl/foto-s/?q=shelterbouw&fq%5B%5D=search_s_mediatype:%22Foto%27s%22&mode=gallery&view=horizontal Maybe the details are useful for anyone building one in scale. Rob
  6. I just found a really nice set of construction photos of the TAB-Vs at Soesterberg: https://nimh-beeldbank.defensie.nl/foto-s/?q=shelterbouw&fq%5B%5D=search_s_mediatype:%22Foto%27s%22&mode=gallery&view=horizontal Maybe the details are useful for anyone building one in scale. Rob
  7. Not an answer to your question, but possibly useful: the brown color is FS 30117, color-checked on a RNLAF weapon. Rob
  8. KMC did both wheels in set 72-7016: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/kmc-72-7016-douglas-a-1h-j-skyraider--343080 Rob
  9. Nice memories! I like the colors on your engine, and maybe I will do something similar with mine. I copied the box art, but it's too simple. Regarding the yellowed decal: I think the only realistic option is to rip it off with a piece of tape. Or maybe a more gentle method. Or maybe they will simply fall off it touched In case you want to replace the two decals, I happen to have the same kit, but I will not use them. Despite being from 1985, they still look excellent, absolutely no yellowing. Yours for the postage . The cockpit decals are gone, though. Rob
  10. Recently I built that same old engine and trailer, straight from the box. I replaced the 'closed' nozzle with an 'open' one later, since the nozzle is open when the engine is off. Rob
  11. My best suggestion: learn how to draw decals yourself in vector graphics. CorelDraw Home & Student costs ~85 euros, and it a fantastic tool for modelling. Not only can you design decals, but you can also use it to analyse photos, overlay photos with drawings, analyse kit shape problems, design parts from photos, scale drawings to exactly the size you need, or make your own line drawings. I use it on almost every model project. Once you designed your own decals, companies like Arctic Decals and Spotmodel can print them for you, for a reasonable fee. As long as you do the design yourself, it's quite affordable. Rob
  12. A small update. I analysed the nice three-view drawing included in the kit. The wing span is 282 mm, or 20.3 m in 1:1 scale. The length from nose (excluding pitot) to trailing edge horizontal tail is 188 mm, 13.5 m in 1:1 scale. But I still haven't found any BAe dimensions. Rob
  13. It's non-stealth, non-combat, medium performance, 10 year old technology prototype. I've worked on UAVs and I would consider the software the most valuable part. Therefore I don't see any problem in publishing the main dimensions. Rob
  14. One more thing. I tried to find the basic dimensions, and found only one number, a quoted length of 19.8 m or 65 ft. I guess this is an error (way too big) and probably it's the span. That leads me to the question how Combat Kits managed to make a model of the Mantis, if even the basic numbers are unknown. Does anyone know? Rob
  15. Many thanks! Every photo is useful, especially a decent resolution photo like yours. In general terms I'm always amazed how well US companies 'milk' their projects PR-wise, and how bad European companies are at this. Rob
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