Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

VH-USB

Members
  • Content Count

    100
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

86 Good

About VH-USB

  • Rank
    New Member
  • Birthday 11/30/1946

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Chicago

Recent Profile Visitors

1,235 profile views
  1. VH-USB

    Boeing 707-123

    The old box scale Revell kit can be built into a very nice 707-123. Here's my brother's build: https://www.airlinercafe.com/photosearch.php?reg=N7503A Tim
  2. Sadly, due to family commitments, Ardpol is no longer in business. Ardpol produced 4 Curtiss T-32 Condor kits, 3 of which were military versions and 1 which was the Bryd Antarctic plane on floats. Ardpol did not produce any civil airline versions but did plan on releasing an American Airlines wheeled version. The owner of Ardpol sold some of his molds to a "friendly competitor" so we may see some Ardpol kits in the future but under a different label. Tim
  3. And now there is the Lockheed-Martin Orion Spacecraft: https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/products/orion.html Lockheed has recycled the Altair name as well. Tim
  4. Absolutely! I am thrilled that we'll soon have a new 1/48 Vega kit. I don't want to come across as nitpicking anal details. Just want to point out some things that detail orientated modelers may be interested in. The important thing is that we'll soon have a NEW 1/48 Vega kit and oh so many color schemes to choose from! And let's hope Dora follows on with their planned 1/48 Orion 9 kit as that's a plane that would be so lovely in 1/48 scale. Oh, and a 1/48 Altair would be a natural after the Orion!! Tim
  5. Right indeed Roger. And Dora has the aileron balance on the lower surface too small (fore & aft). In addition, Dora has the upper aileron balance leading edge line parallel with the wing spar when it actually is parallel with the aileron hinge line. The Vega had 2 different types of ailerons, the externally balanced version as Dora has molded and an internally balanced version which would have a simple straight hinge line. So study photos carefully when building a particular Vega. And to complicate matters, Lockheed Sirius' had 3 different styles of ailerons! Tim
  6. Hi Mike, Yes, there were a number of Shell Oil Vegas, 4 to be exact. Some photos of 2 of them can be found here: https://dmairfield.com/airplanes/NC926Y/index.html And here's a list of the Vegas owned by Shell Oil: http://www.internetmodeler.com/2005/november/aviation/MPM_Vega.php And there was a Shell Oil Orion 9, the only metal fuselage one built (originally an Altair). This airplane is now hanging in a Swiss museum and painted as a Swissair Orion 9. There also was a Shell Oil Sirius. Many years ago Shell Oil supplied me with the Pantone color numbers for the original Shell Oil red and yellow used on their aircraft down through the years. These colors did change over the years. Tim
  7. Yes, both of Mattern's 'Century of Progress' Vegas make for colorful models. On Mattern's eagle scheme version be aware that the feather details vary from port to starboard and the wheelpants have 3 different claw designs! Tim
  8. Looking good. It appears as though the lower wing panels insert into the uppers, a method I am not too fond of. And the ailerons are a bit inaccurate, although this should be fairly easy to correct. I'm looking forward to the final kit and I do hope Dora moves into more colorful marking options. The Post and AE Vega color schemes are too common and boring. Let's have more color! Tim
  9. Here's a photo of Mattern & Griffin taken in Berlin shortly after the crash that ended their round-the-world flight: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_102-13655,_James_Mattern_und_Bennet_Griffin.jpg They suffered injuries to head and hand during the landing. Bandages are evident, as are their oil-stained clothes. Their clothes are actually very common for the period, especially among aviators. Tim
  10. Fantastic builds, as are all of Roger's models! One thing I especially like about Roger's models is that they have the correct 'sit' which gives a very realistic look. I have seen way too many models which have their landing gear, and tailwheel, too tall which gives them a standing on 'tippy toes' appearance. I can't wait to see Roger's latest builds posted here. Hint: a fabulous pair of single-engine Lockheeds. Tim
  11. And, once Lone Star Models reopens in September he'll be working on an alternating month schedule... One month taking orders and the next month casting those orders. So, if you really want one of his products be aware it may take up to 2 months for an order to arrive once placed. Tim
  12. Mike, Lone Star Models is currently in the process of moving (to another city) so it will a while before he's up and running and filling orders. Latest information from Mike at Lone Star Models is that he's not accepting orders until after the relocation and the IPMS/USA Nationals. Orders won't be taken until September, at the earliest. Tim
  13. Glad to be of some help Rob. You may find the book 'The Boeing 247: The First Modern Airliner' by Robert van der Linden, to be very useful. And that patchy anodized finish was only found on the very early 247s, most all were painted in gray. Tim
  14. Chris, You may want to have a look at the 'Lockheed File' website: http://www.adastron.com/lockheed/lock1.htm Feel free to contact the webmaster, Ron Cuskelly, as he is extremely knowledgeable on the subject. And the 2-book series 'The RAAF Hudson Story: A History of Hudson's in Australia' by David Vincent may prove very useful. Tim
  15. Rob, Turner's 247 has a very good web presence so period photos should be easy to find. The NASM website will prove useful since you intend to build Turner's 247 in it's later airline markings: https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/boeing-247-d Note that the boxart for the Wlliams Bros. 247 kit shows Turner's plane in the very early patchwork anodized aluminum finish. This is incorrect. Tuner's 247 was painted the usual gray Boeing applied to hide the patchwork appearance of the anodized aluminum. The cowlings on the preserved 247 in the NASM are original and unrestored so can be used as reference for the correct gray color. Tim
×
×
  • Create New...