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John Aero

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John Aero last won the day on January 5 2015

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About John Aero

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  1. John Aero

    Mystery Uniform

    The person to his left is wearing an RFC 'Maternity' Jacket. so possibly a"flying visit". A very regular occurrence. John
  2. John Aero

    I hate photo etch

    The tool I described in post 16 is exactly as simple as that, a flat length of aluminium strip or brass. I've even used a piece of wood, but of at least three to four mm thick. It's just got to stand very hot water for about 20 seconds. I last used the technique about 5 years ago and I still have a box of Nylon rods somewhere. If I can find time I will find it and photograph it. but it may have gone to landfill like much of the old workshop. John
  3. Lovely work Patrik. A number of British Naval biplane aircraft (Fairey III.F for instance) have struts which are perpendicular to the wing spars. The simple reason for this is that the flying and landing wires can be of the same length in each wing cellule making for less spares needed to be carried on board ship. The wing structures can be basically the same with the lower wing fittings being wider than the top centre section, but in the case of the Fairey III.F the lower wings are slightly longer than the top wings due to the wing spar root fittings. On aircraft were the struts are vertical in front view and so at an angle to the wing spars, the flying and landing wires are of different lengths. The wings can be the same length, where the top centre section and the fuselage width are the same. John
  4. John Aero

    I hate photo etch

    The tool I described in post 16 is exactly as simple as that, a flat length of aluminium strip or brass. I've even used a piece of wood, but of at least three to four mm thick. It's just got to stand very hot water for about 20 seconds. I last used the technique about 5 years ago and I still have a box of Nylon rods somewhere. If I can find time I will find it and photograph it. but it may have gone to landfill like much of the old workshop. Most fishing line comes on a reel or bobbin and all you are doing is removing the manufacture induced curve by tensioning it straight it using hot water, and retaining the straightness by cooling it, John
  5. John Aero

    I hate photo etch

    For small dipole aerials, try using a suitable gauge of Nylon fishing line. To put pre-formed holes in epoxy moulds I use the following technique for straightening Nylon line, which can then be chopped up to any required length. I have a strip of aluminium, roughly 25 mm wide and 150 mm long by 1.5 mm thick. Drill a small hole in a corner of the Ali, then saw a fine 'V' shaped slot into one of the 25 mm ends of the metal strip. Pass the Nylon line through the hole and tie a knot in it to secure the line. Then wind the line lengthwise around the 150 mm long Ali strip, making sure that it is tight. Finish the turns by pulling the line tightly into the 'V' notch to lock it. Hold the assembly with pliers and plunge into nearly boiling water. Allow to heat up for a while and then run the assembly under cold water to cool thoroughly. With a craft knife, chop out the straight lengths about 10 mm from the ends. You will now have perfectly straight lengths of Nylon rod. Cut this to your desired sizes and it will glue well with super glue. It will remain straight but it will also have a bit of flexible "bounce back". A similar technique can be used by coiling the Nylon tightly onto a suitable diameter aluminium or brass tube to make circular Loop aerials. Just cut off a loop and secure the ends with super glue. Nylon is much better with this technique than Styrene. Keep the surplus in a tin. The staple like hand hold steps can also be made this way by rounding the edges of some suitable width square rod. John
  6. Donation made a few days ago, but I have a feeling it's on my alternative email and not the one registered on Britmodeller. John
  7. A Bain Marie, which is a pan full of hot water, with an inner bowl which does not contact the bottom of the pan, is a way of transferring the heat of the pan water to the liquid in the bowl, in which is immersed the resin parts. This is the way you melt chocolate, without it burning on the pan bottom. Polyurethane resin has a heat deflection temperature of around about 50 deg. An alternative way is to strap the resin fuselage either side of a thin piece of metal such as a small steel rule or a thin large nail file or flat knife blade and immerse that into the water. allow to heat and then run under cold water. This gives you a constant centre line. John
  8. If you have a complete prop, get some Plasticine or soft modelling wax and carefully press the prop with equal pressure on all the blades, into the modelling material. Ensure that you have a good impression when you take out the master prop. The impression is now your jig.. Make three more impressions. Check each blade to see if you can match each break. Use a gel type super glue to stick the blades back onto the hubs. allow to set and then trim off any glue seepage. This I think will be your simplest way. A cruder way would be to buy some pressed metal Dinky spare three blade props and file them to size and shape Steve Flowers of Leicester www.model-supplies.co.uk make Dinky Toy Car and Plane spares. John
  9. A most interesting purchase. The wood appears to be Box, Lime or Beech . I don't think that they are masters but that they are turned up for particular models probably solids, by someone quite skilled with a wood lathe. They remind me of the stuff that the late W.O.Doylend used to make for his beautiful solids. His book Aircraft in Miniature (not to be confused with a modern company) is one of my treasured possessions. He was a customer of mine many years ago but I seem to recall he lived then in the south. Turned hardwood, wooden parts also featured in a number of balsa "Solid" model kits in the early 1940's so equally they might be old stock from such a company, when I get time I'll try and look through Aeromodeller for any Manchester based model kit manufacturers. John
  10. Patrik, The information I have from a Swedish source, for the Swedish Hart (Pegasus) overall length, (with Rudder light) is 8.56 metres which converts to 28 feet, so by my reckoning this makes the Perseus version of 28' 6". The span is 37' 3". John
  11. John Aero

    Westland Wapiti TT

    Off the top of my head I think it's 84 Sqn at Shaibah using the sign as good symbol as used by a number of ancient communities. John
  12. John Aero

    Westland Wapiti TT

    I scavenged this from the net some years ago. I don't know who to credit which is why I've severely cropped the photo to the detail we need. This is a standard RAF Wapiti TT installation of which I have come across very little information whilst working on my Wapiti/Wallace drawing project which was stalled due to ill health. Visible in the picture is the under slung winch crate and just behind this, the bomb aimers lozenge shaped hatch, through which I believe the drogues are dispatched and just seen at the top of the underside is the square opening through which (I think) the twin pulleys for the cables protrude as seen in the lower photo in post 2. It seems that the Australian crate is mounted further forward. There is remarkably little in the Long Drag a short history of Target Towing on these hand cranked early winches. John
  13. Private cameras were officially forbidden in operational areas but were a bit more relaxed in the UK. John
  14. Tony, I'm delighted that you did spot the problem. I haven't built one and my kit arrived post production and those tiny exhausts just escaped notice. It was too late (for the Hart) anyway, However your comment was just in time thank you. The reply which I have received, I think said "I could have slapped myself at this news, and I don't know exactly how this happened" came out something like "ex I know how, I slap". Don't worry Ivan my Ukrainian is zero. John
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