Jump to content

06/24

Gold Member
  • Posts

    3,514
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    10

06/24 last won the day on February 13 2018

06/24 had the most liked content!

6 Followers

About 06/24

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Edinburgh

Recent Profile Visitors

6,222 profile views

06/24's Achievements

Very Obsessed Member

Very Obsessed Member (5/9)

7.4k

Reputation

  1. Main wheel bay also from the Airfix version Task Force 317.8 by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Dropped intake doors (crude but should clean up ok) Task Force 317.8 by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr
  2. Grafting the Airfix ‘pit into the Italeri fuselage Task Force 317.8 by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Task Force 317.8 by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr
  3. “…nasty, brutish and short…” Thomas Hobbes 1651 “The Empire Strikes Back” Newsweek magazine cover 19 April 1982 “I'm not allowed to say how many planes joined the raid, but I counted them all out and I counted them all back.” Brian Hanrahan I was 12 when the Falklands War broke out. Like most people in the UK, I had never heard of the Falklands, let alone have any idea where they were. Growing up in the 1980s, I came to despise Margaret Thatcher and her brand of cruel politics, but on this one thing, at least, she made the right decision. War is never glorious, but sometimes, sadly, necessary. When the Argentine Junta made its fateful decision to invade, they set in train a series of outstanding acts, as Britain shook off its lethargy and proceeded, with great skill, dash, bravery and more than a little luck, to wage a war 8000 miles from home waters. The task group was the bleeding edge of that war, and the men and machines fascinated me at 12, and still do today. I remember the returning ships, although time has dimmed those memories, and now, as an adult, remember the lives lost with respect. Lots of waffle 06/24, how about some plastic butchery? This project began as a spin off of my Cold War whatiffery, realising that the force that retook the Falklands was an all arms effort that utilised many of my favourite old bits of kit (indeed, with hindsight, is probably why they are favourites). I could therefore make double use of much of what I had acquired. However, if there is an iconic British weapon of the war, then it must be the mighty Shar, the Sea Harrier FRS.1 so I set about building one. Consensus seems to be that the Esci/Italeri (also once released by Airfix!) is the most accurate, albeit a kit first tooled in 1983 or thereabouts. I’ve set to, but am grafting in bits of Airfix Sea Harrier where I think they add a little more detail. Task Force 317.8 by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Task Force 317.8 by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr
  4. Found this lovely image online, a hint of things to come…
  5. Ok, roof. How hard can it be, right? Well, I’m an idiot, so quite hard indeed: Airfix Control Tower replacement roof by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Visual Control Room by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Visual Control Room by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Hmm. It’s far from perfect, and I’m not even sure I like it. What do we think?
  6. Steady progress… 1:76 or 1:72 Airfix Control Tower by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr 1:76 or 1:72 Airfix Control Tower by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr I’ve also made a larger roof. Once the etched windows turn up I can work out how thick they are, so the the interior walls can be spaced to allow the window frames to slide into position. I may need to fill some windows now that I’ve found interior plans to imitate, particularly where the stairs would go. Two doors on the rear wall isn’t prototypical so some imagineering will be required.
  7. Wholly unrelated, it has been a lovely couple of days in Embra, so if you’ll excuse the thread drift… Wardie afternoon by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Wardie afternoon by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Wardie afternoon by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr
  8. To make the interior look better, and to give the model some rigidity, I’ve started skinning the inside of the ground floor with brick. Nothing is fixed yet, as I have some of the Flightpath etched windows on order to trial. Floors are simply 1mm plastic card cut to size, the first floor will rest on the brick inner walls and whatever internal partition walls I decide to include. If anyone has suggestions for a typical internal floor plan I’m all ears. Airfix Control Tower/Watch Office by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Airfix Control Tower/Watch Office by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr
  9. Bit of a break from Bedfords this evening: Airfix Control Tower/Watch Office by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Airfix Control Tower/Watch Office by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Airfix Control Tower/Watch Office by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr One and a bit Airfix Control Towers (but you knew that already didn’t you). Not a kit I built in my youth, but one that always appealed. The extended version is completely fictional, just cut and shut to something that feels right. I am addressing the one serious flaw in the Airfix original, the unprototypical extension under the balcony, and may replace the rooftop visual control office with something more modern (at least, modern for 1985) but it remains, at best, a caricature of the real thing.
  10. I don’t like to admit to stalking, but our esteemed former flyer has posted pics on a photo sharing site. I’m hopeful of an update imminently.
  11. Apologies for the lack of updates, busy with real life etc. However, I’ve started a model of a 5 ton low mobility TK, using a cheap diecast as the base. Untitled by Jon Gwinnett, on Flickr Unfortunately this has highlighted the shortcomings of the JB cab, which is rather underscale I believe. However, any program to replace the other JB cabs will only happen if (a) I can get enough cheap diecasts to sacrifice and (b) I can find a big tin of can be bothered. In other news, I managed to drill out one cab for an open hatch for the HIAB version, no photos yet but it seemed to go without a hitch, which surprised me, drilling an 8 mm hole in a transparency not being something I thought would work,
  12. Have you seen young Mr Fritag’s Chippie and JPs? Well worth seeking out, even if they are at the opposite end of the scale envelope to your builds!
  13. So a few comments from northern climes… Having seen photos of the damage caused by the Rhyl seagull, to both the canopy and Red 6’s bone dome, it was notable that the blast shield did its job, in that it appears to have arrested progress of the ex-seagull. This leads me to believe I might prefer the back seat to the front, not that my 50-something fat bottom will ever fly in a Hawk. Second, the Canopy work is again superb, it almost goes without saying. Short of a shrink ray, I can’t conceive how it could be bettered. The MCA choppers are cool, we get occasional transits past us, particularly for tourists stuck by the tide on Cramond Island. However it’s sign of my age and nostalgia that I still prefer a Sea King, even if the new jobbies are much more effective. (I presume they are?) Finally, isn’t Scotland lovely. Even after very nearly thirty years here, I do occasionally just stand and stare in wonder. Ever more so since we moved back in to the Athens of the north. Plus we make whisky…
×
×
  • Create New...