Jump to content

Geoffrey Sinclair

Members
  • Posts

    330
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Geoffrey Sinclair

  1. Unfortunately the distinction between the Spitfire 22 and 24 is a little blurred. Using the RAF Contract Cards and Serial Registers there were 78 mark 24 and the Contract Cards include the note, "The designation Spitfire F Mk 24 has been approved for Spitfire F Mk 22 aircraft fitted with a rear tank. Air 2 (a) 23 March 1946, M11592." Which is a month after mark 24 began to be officially produced. Meantime the production reports think only Spitfire 24 were built from February 1946 on, in fact 2 of the February production were mark 22 and the last mark 22 produced was PK515 in November 1946, it was then converted to mark 24. On top of that Serials PK313, VN301 (April 46) and VN314-6 (February 46) can be considered F.22 converted to F.24. PK313 is counted as an F.22 even though it is the final entry in the PK serials F.24 contract card but with a delivery date of 17 March 1945, and its entry in the F.22 contract card is ruled through, it was a conversion. The PK serials contract card has the heading Spitfire 24 (ex 22) There were 24 PK serials, 678, 679, 681 to 683, 685 to 689, 712 to 714, 716 to 726 (24) Produced at South Marsden. Delivered July to November 1946. Note PK680, 684 and 715 are therefore considered built as mark 22. There were 54 VN serials 301 to 334, 477 to 496. Vickers Armstrong. VN301 to 330, 333 and 334 officially produced to February to December 1946, VN331, 332 and 477 on officially produced June 1947 to March 1948, with 2 produced in June 1947. Seafire 47 production began in July 1947 at South Marsden and ended in March 1949, total production 90. So the overlap time wise is with the final group of VN serial mark 24.
  2. To fix an error, when 3,552 was incorrectly transcribed as 3,352. Hurricane production. As of June 1944, well after both mark IIB production and imports from Canada ended, the RAF Aircraft Census says 3,552 IIB ordered, 3,550 delivered, plus 230 IIBB (IIE) ordered and delivered, total 3,782. Then 3,782 - 3,218 = 564 IIB from Canada. This is versus Canadian production of 514 mark II for the RAF plus 30 mark I for the RAF converted to mark II before departure from Canada and 150 ex RCAF mark XII, these 180 are counted in the census as mark II ordered by the RAF, giving a total of 694. It means as far as the RAF is concerned 694 - 564 = 130 Canadian built mark II that arrived in Britain ended up as officially ordered IIC, so under a fifth NOT over a half of CCF mark II production for the RAF as IIC, then come further conversions, the RAF serials registers have around 187 CCF built Hurricanes listed as IIC, which is over a quarter of those sent to the RAF. Mark IIB production ended in Britain in November 1942, while the final 248 CCF built Hurricanes arrived March to June 1943.
  3. https://www.designation-systems.net/usmilav/original-docs/ Model Designation of Army Aircraft, 11th ed., January 1945 and 1946. Poking around the site can be informative.
  4. Kittyhawk Mark III FR350 was ex P-40K-1 42-46143, Taken on Charge 18 September 1942, Struck Off Charge 8 March 1944
  5. I have no details on serials and such, only numbers of aircraft. And the monthly reports treat Takoradi and Egypt as the same destination, Middle East. Also the Middle East was not always prompt in reporting arrivals. Mediterranean would mean Gibraltar and Malta. Takoradi Looks like the first Fulmars arrived at Takoradi on the fortnight ending 1 November 1940. With 7 en route, 4 arrivals in the time period, with 6 currently being uncrated. In the next week 5 were sent to the Middle East. The reports change format on 22 November and then become cumulative totals on 6 December, by which time Takoradi had 19 Fulmars shipped to it, 4 of which were en route 2 had been received in the previous week, bringing the received total to 15, 6 were on hand and serviceable, 9 had been sent to the Middle East of which 4 were en route. For week ending 20 December the reports settle into reporting both new and cumulative totals. 24 shipped, 15 arrived, 4 on hand, 11 departed, 4 of which en route to Middle East The 9 arrivals in week ending 10 January 1941 came from HMS Furious. As of 31 January 1941 the totals were 31 shipped, 24 arrived, 1 on hand, 23 departed, 10 en route to Middle East As of 28 February 1941 the totals were 34 shipped, 31 arrived, 11 on hand, 23 departed, 4 en route to Middle East which does not add up, week ending 7 March totals are 8 on hand, rest unchanged. As of 21 March 1941, 48 Fulmars shipped, 34 arrived, 27 departed Takoradi, 19 arrived in Middle East As of 28 March 1941, 48, 46, 31, 24. However by 9 May 1941 the shipped and arrived figures are revised to 36, 31 departed Takoradi, 30 arrived. Week ending 13 June reports 1 Fulmar written off at Takoradi. No more Fulmars arrive to 22 August when the reports end, 2 left Takoradi week ending 6 June, 1 w/e 8 August, 1 w/e 15 August. Arrivals in the Middle East to 32 w/e 13 June and stay that way. The monthly figures. Month \ Mediterranean \ Middle East Oct-40 \ \ 11 Nov-40 \ \ 1 Dec-40 \ \ 9 Jan-41 \ \ 7 Feb-41 \ 4 \ 3 Mar-41 \ \ 26 Apr-41 \ \ 16 May-41 \ 6 \ 12 Jun-41 \ 6 \ 24 Jul-41 \ 6 \ 23 Aug-41 \ 4 \ 10 Sep-41 \ 7 \ 18 Oct-41 \ 4 \ 2 Nov-41 \ 3 \ Dec-41 \ \ Jan-42 \ 10 \ Feb-42 \ 3 \ 1 Mar-42 \ 1 \ Apr-42 \ 2 \ May-42 \ 2 \ 3 Total \ 58 \ 166 So it seems all the early exports went via Takoradi, but then switched to by sea around the cape. With the plan to have a carrier operating around Singapore exports of Fulmars to Ceylon and the Far East began in October 1941, more followed, by end 1942 totals were 27 Ceylon, 12 Far East, 3 India, 15 Kenya, 25 South Africa. Another 9 were exported to Trinidad between August 1943 and February 1944.
  6. Unfortunately no more details, the post was a full copy of all the entries. The RAF did not track FAA aircraft.
  7. The official aircraft import and export reports do not count aircraft moving as part of units, since they are not in the reports it appears all the Buffalo exported from Britain officially moved as part of units. Unlike for example 24 Fulmars sent via Takoradi. Unfortunately some reports treat Takoradi and Egypt as the same destination, Middle East. This carried through on reports to Churchill and provoked a complaint by Middle East command that newly arrived aircraft sitting in crates at at Takoradi should not be counted as front line aircraft in Egypt. Note the individual reports I have do not reconcile well at times. Most short range aircraft exported from the UK to the Middle East were via Takoradi but the route took a while to set up and Hurricanes were being exported from April 1940 on, with gaps in May 1940 and January 1941, with 245 exported by end 1940, of which it looks like 144 were sent to Takoradi. As of 4 July 1941 433 Hurricane exports to Takoradi of which 358 had arrived, Sea/Air via Mediterranean had 273 Hurricanes sent of which 232 arrived Malta of which 164 arrived Middle East, 71 Hurricanes has been sent via the Cape of which 23 had arrived in the Middle East, this became 34 week ending 11 July, 64 week ending 23 August. As of 4 July 1941 113 Blenheims had been sent by air, 4 by sea via the Mediterranean, and 357 by sea to Takoradi. The first Beaufighters arrived in Takoradi in April 1942, nearly a year after exports via Gibraltar commenced, a similar story for Beauforts.
  8. RAF Serial Registers, Brewster Buffalo, 71 Sqn mentions, AS414, 416, 421, 423. AS410, AMAS? 12 Jul 40, AAEE "D" 9 Feb 41 AS411, 37 MU, 4 MU CRE 9 Sep 40, Instructional 2852M? AS412, AMAS? 10 Jul 40, 39 MU 8 Aug 40 then 4MU CRE "B" same day, Cat E 10 Apr 42 AS413, 37 MU 24 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40, Admiralty 20 Oct or Dec 40 AS414, 37 MU 19 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40, 71 Sqn 26 Oct 40, SAS CRU 10 Nov 40, instructional 2855M AS415, 37 MU 19 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40 AS416, 37 MU 19 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40, 71 Sqn 24 Oct 40, 37 MU 20 Nov 40, to FAA 21 Nov? 40 AS417, 18 MU 18 Oct 40, 37 MU 30 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40, 37 MU 1 Sep 40, (Unreadable) 4 Sep 40, SAS CRE (Mods) 1 Dec 40, Instructional A37 AS418, 37 MU 10? Jul 40, (Unreadable) CRE 20 Aug 40 AS419, 37 MU 11 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40, SOC 2 Jul 43 AS420, 37 MU 10 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40 AS421, 8? MU 18 Jul 40, 37 MU 20 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 21 Aug 40, 71 Sqn 26 Oct 40, 37 MU 16 Nov 40, to FAA 21 Nov 40 AS422, 5 MU 18 Jul 40, Hatstone? RNAS 24 Jul 40, (Sundry Units), CAT E 22 Apr 42. AS423, 5 MU 14? Jul 40, 71 Sqn 20 Oct 40, to FAA 21 Nov 40 AS424, 5 MU 16 Jul 40, 37 MU 2 Sep 40, 4 MU CRE 9 Sep 40, 37 MU 13 Sep 40, To FAA 21 Nov 40 AS425, 5 MU 19 Jul 40, AAEE 31 Jul 40, 37 MU 11 Aug 40, 4 MU CRE "B" 21 Aug 40, SOC 1 Jul 43 AS426, 5 MU 19 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 23 Aug 40, To FAA 21 Nov 40, Instructional A39 AS427, 5 MU 23 Jul 40, SAS CRE 12 Nov 40, to FAA 21 Nov 40, Instructional A38 AS428, 5 MU 23 Jul 40, 4 MU CRE 25 Aug 40, To FAA 21 Nov 40, SOC 2 Jun 43 AS429, 5 MU, 4 MU CRE "B" 2 Sep 40, Instructional 2857M AS430, 5 MU 19 Jul 20, 2 MAE? 10 Aug 40, Instructional 2859M AX810 to AX820 All to Admiralty 31 October 1940. BB450 To Admiralty 31 January 1941
  9. Taken Verbatim from UNITED STATES MILITARY AIRCRAFT by Jos Heyman. Air Force F = Fighter (1924 - 1962) Mentions of trainer P-47 The P-47D was similar to the P-47C and 12604 were built with serials 42-7953/8702, 42-22250/23299, 42-25274/27384, 42-27389/29466, 42-74615/76614, 43-25254/25753, 44-19558/21107, 44-32668/33867, 44-89684/90483 and 45-49090/49554. A batch with serials 45-49555/49974 was cancelled. A number of the aircraft were supplied to the RAF, Brazil, USSR and Mexico and some were fitted with the R-2800-59 engine. A number of aircraft were converted as TP-47D trainers. Serials included 42-8028, 42-8035, 42-8084, 42-8141, 42-8166, 42-8197, 42-8245, 42-8270, 42-8283, 42-8287, 42-8301, 42-8334, 42-8531, 42-22315, 42-22320, 42-22333, 42-22360, 42-22415, 42-22440, 42-22615, 42-22621, 42-22711, 42-22864, 42-22877, 42-22878, 42-22993, 42-23121, 42-26172, 42-27606, 42-27805, 42-27814, 42-28708, 42-28711, 42-28725, 42-29065, 42-29107, 42-29218, 42-29221, 42-29389, 42-29391, 42-29408, 42-74838, 42-74861, 42-75467, 42-75469, 42-75477, 42-75481, 42-76377, 43-25270, 43-25273, 44-20207, 44-32680, 44-32699, 44-32798, 44-32802, 44-32804, 44-90126, 44-90258, 44-90264, 44-90270, 44-90373, 44-90468, 45-49219, 45-49250, 42-49295, 45-49386 and 45-49514. Those P-47Ds remaining in service on 11 June 1948 were redesignated as F-47D. The P-47G version was similar to the P-47D and 354 with serials 42-24920/25273 were built by Curtiss-Wright. Four of these, 42-24972, 42-25068, 42-25266 and 42-25267, were converted with a second cockpit as TP-47G. The XP-47N was a P-47D (42-27387) fitted with a different wing, giving it a span of 42'10", 13.06 m, length of 36'2", 11.02 m. It had a R-2800-57 engine. The production version, P-47N had a span of 42'7", 12.98 m, a length of 36'1", 11.00 and a R-2800-77 engine and 1816 were built with serials 44-87784/89450 and 45-49975/50123. Aircraft with serials 44-89451/89683 and 45-50124/53574 were cancelled. Those remaining in service on 11 June 1948 were redesignated as F-47N. A number of P-47Ns were converted as TP-47N. They had serials 44-89107, 44-89322 and 44-89404 and on 11 June 1948 those remaining in service were redesignated as TF-47N.
  10. Roger Freeman, Mighty Eighth War Manual, Fighter external tanks, US Gallons nominal/actual, drop tanks available to the 8th Air Force 75/84, Steel, US, P-47 and P-51 originally for P-39 108/108, Steel, UK, P-47 108/108, Paper, UK, P-47 and P-51, originally for Hurricanes 110/110, Steel, US P-51, intended for P-47 use. 150/165, Steel, US, P-47, "flat" tank 150/165, Steel, UK, P-47, "flat" tank 165/165, Steel, US, P-38, ferry tank, unpressurised, used up to 20,000 feet. 200/205, Paper, US, P-47, ferry tank, unpressurised. 200/215, Steel, UK, P-47. Francis Dean, America's Hundred Thousand. The P-38 also had 300 gallon ferry tanks. P-47D ranges are given for 300 and 410 gallons of external fuel. P-47N range is given for 440 gallons of external fuel. P-51 ranges are given for 150, 220 and 300 gallons of external fuel. General Kenny reports hanging a pair of 300 gallon drop tanks of P-47D while commissioning 150 gallon external tanks from an Australian supplier. As of January 1944 the British report building (imperial gallons) 90 gallon metal and paper tanks for P-47 and planning to built a 150 gallon metal one. By July the 90 gallon had become 108 US gallon for P-47 and P-51 and the 150 gallon was in fact US gallons for the P-47.
  11. Austin built Lancaster mark VII production began in April 1945, with 10 built, then 12 in May and 34 in June, production finished in December, serials, 38 from NX611 to NX648, 43 from NX661 to NX703, 44 from NX715 to NX758, 25 from NX770 to NX794, 30 from RT670 to RT699, total 180. From a group of mid 1945 memos on aircraft production, extracts from Lancaster section May 1945 (hole punched in page where date is), April Lancasters signalled from Austins are 4 mark I and 10 mark VII with with Merlin 22, 1 mark VII with Merlin 24. 11 June 1945, Amend last month's Austin return to read 10 mark VII with Merlin 24 temperate sets and 5 mark I with Merlin 22. No tropical sets have been fitted. 9 July 1945 of the 34 mark VII signalled from Austins (in June) 28 were fitted with temperate sets and 6 tropical (Merlin 24). All future aircraft will be fitted with Merlin 24 tropical sets 27 August 1945, Austin continuing to fit tropical sets of Merlin 24. So according to the memos, the first 22 mark VII were non tropical as built, and probably the first 50, so to NX672. With Just Jane of course being NX611. The lists in Avro Lancaster by Harry Holmes has all NX serials as delivered to Far East Standard, Merlin 24, their one line histories have some of the early aircraft serving in the Near and Middle East. The list of RT serials has 30 with Merlin 24, no mention of Far East, their one line histories suggest they all stayed in Europe. Some additional engine information. When it comes to transport aircraft production in 1945 some were reported as civil but most as military and there are gaps in the civil production reports I have. It also does not help the first Lancastrian I in February 1945 is reported as a Lancaster Ic. Yorks came in VIP, Passenger, LRF (Long Range Freighter) and PCF (Passenger Cum Freighter) versions. To end May 1945 official military production was 5 VIP, 20 Passenger, 39 LRF, 6 PCF, total 70, plus 1 civil type under a Ministry of Supply contract, by end July the figures were 5, 20, 42, 7 and 3. Lancastrian I production was under civil, 8 by end May 1945, 15 by end July. May 1945, all Lancastrians to date fitted with Merlin 24 temperate. Of total York I delivered to date, 63 were fitted with Merlin 22, 6 with Merlin 24 (5 temperate, 1 tropical). The York PCF signalled had Merlin 24 temperate. 3 BOAC York delivered to AST Hamble have Merlin 24 tropical. June 1945, All military type York to be fitted with temperate Merlin 24, BOAC with tropical Merlin 24. Lancastrians had temperate Merlin 24. July 1945, York Military Temperate Merlin 24, York BOAC Tropical Merlin 24, Lancastrian Temperate Merlin 24. The York contract summary card notes 4 LV serials prototypes, 200 MW serials, 100 PE serials and 150 TJ serials, with the TJ serials having Merlin 22. It looks like the original intention was Merlin XX, then Merlin 24. 92 of the PE and all the TJ serials were cancelled. The summary of the RAF orders is 4 prototypes, 5 VIP, 5 BOAC, 20 FCP (Freighter Cum Passenger), 64 PCF, 114 LRF. So 208 production examples out of 252 production Yorks, 45 of which officially under civil contracts. Of course going through the production reports gives 5 VIP, 20 Passenger, 114 LRF, 68 PCF, 39 MoS Civil, 5 Private Venture Civil and 1 MoS PCF. Shall we say the accounting system was suffering from the return of official civil production and who the aircraft were for? RAF Lancastrians were 2 mark 1 (VH737 ex PD176) and VH742, plus 33 mark 2 and 8 mark 4. There were 21 civil mark 1 and 18 mark 3. Merlin 22 production had ended in October 1944, Tropical Merlin 24 had 8 built in April 1945, then 27 in October and 40 in November and 224 in December, with production continuing into 1946. Not quite a match to reports of T.24 being fitted in mid 1945.
  12. The view from the Ministry of Aircraft Production. Propeller reports start in March 1942. Barracuda Mark I production July 1942 to February 1943 (33 built, 23 Fairey, 4 Blackburn, 5 Westland, 1 Boulton Paul) Barracuda Mark II production October 1942 to November 1945 (2,097 built, 1,107 Fairey, 696 Blackburn, 13 Westland, 281 Boulton Paul) Barracuda Mark III production March 1944 to November 1945 (410 built by Boulton Paul) Merlin 30 production from November 1940 to July 1942, (660 built at Derby) Merlin 32 production from June 1942 to April 1945, (3,500 built at Derby) To March to July 1942, propellers are Rotol Hydraulic 3 blade (50 made in the 5 months), for Barracuda March to June for Barracuda I in July. First entry for Rotol Hydraulic 4 blade for Barracuda (no mark number) in July. August 1942 Rotol Hydraulic 4 blade, Barracuda becomes Barracuda II January 1943 report gives Rotol Hydraulic 4 blade, Barracuda II R4/4, B5/1, Constant Speed Unit Rotol Hydraulic, Barracuda I, II GR/5C. The Hurricane is also Using the GR/5C as well as the GR/2C. April 1943 Constant Speed Unit, Hurricane II, IV, Barracuda I, II GR/5C (no more 2C for the Hurricane) June 1943 Constant Speed Unit, Hurricane II, IV, V, Barracuda I, II GR/5C October 1943 Rotol Hydraulic 4 blade, Barracuda II, III R4/4, B5/1. Rotol Hydraulic Constant Speed Unit presumably under "various" users of GRF and GR. The CSU under repair table lists Fulmar, Hurricane II, Barracuda II, Defiant II, Beaufighter II, Spitfire VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, Seafire III as having GR/5c or GR/8c CSU. (The Spitfire II and V, Seafire IIc having GR/5b or GR/8b) December 1943 Rotol Hydraulic 4 blade, Barracuda II, III R4/4B5/2 February 1944, no Barracuda entry in propeller production, back in March but as Barracuda, no mark information. April 1944 Rotol Hydraulic 4 blade, Barracuda II, T.R.III R4/4B5/2 May 1944 Rotol Hydraulic Constant Speed Unit "various" now GRF and GR/GL January 1945, last entry for Barracuda propeller production.
  13. Beaufighter X RD751 was taken on charge 1 May 1945. 287 squadron as of September 1944, when the first Beaufighter VI arrived, also had Hurricanes, Martinets and Oxfords. Spitfire IX and Tempest V were added in November, the last of the Hurricanes left in March 1945, the Beaufighters in July, the Spitfire IX in September, but Spitfire XVI joined in August. Squadron disbanded in June 1946. Apart from target towing the squadron was also tasked with simulating attacks. No idea whether its Beaufighters did target towing but I suspect not.
  14. As far as the USAAF is concerned all P-38M were conversions of P-38L-5 by revising the fuel system, replacing the standard canopy with a longer and larger one and installation of observer's seat. The prototype 44-25237 was accepted as a P-38L probably in October 1944, one report says first flown as an M on 5 January 1945. The serial numbers of the aircraft involved indicate they were accepted something like, 8 in April, 15 in May and 52 in June 1945, total 75, as L models. Then comes conversion and crew training time. http://joebaugher.com/usaf_fighters/p38_16.html has 80 serials on page dating from 1999, but the entries for 44-53012 to 16 in his later dated listings do not say P-38M. The fact some of the USAAF night fighter squadrons in the Pacific were operating P-38 day fighters and experimenting with radar equipped P-38 is clearly the source of confusion about whether any P-38M made it before the end of the war. The answer appears to be no. Conquering the Night Army Air Forces Night Fighters at War Stephen L. McFarland. No mention of P-38M. "The AAF had tested its own single-engine and single crew night fighters in 1944 over France, sending two P–51s and two P–38s on twenty-one sorties with a RAF night squadron. Their lack of success, at a cost of one P–38, prematurely ended the AAF’s experiment with single-engine or single-crew night fighters." In the Pacific P-38 day fighters were flown by the 6th NFS over Guadalcanal "This reliance on searchlights limited them to one night kill in May 1943. Later attempts to free the P–38s from this dependence by equipping them with Navy AN/APS–4 airborne radars ultimately failed because of the excessive workload imposed on the lone pilot." "At Wakde, the 421st NFS got its first kill on July 7, 1944, after seven months of fruitless night patrols with P–70s and P–38s, and then scored five more kills on Owi Island, four of them on the night of November 28 alone." "Sixty-three separate raids took place between October 8, 1944, and January 11, 1945. The defenders had P–38s orbit over their airfields at 25,000 feet, while antiaircraft artillery with its shells fused at 20,000 feet fired at the intruders. If searchlights illuminated a target, the ground fire stopped while the P–38s pounced on the now-visible enemy. Meanwhile, the P–61s of the 418th and 419th Squadrons orbited outside the ring of antiaircraft artillery fire, waiting for orders from the ground control radar fighter controller to vector them to a target. The defenders made sixty-one interceptions with their airborne radar, claiming five kills." "The thirteen kills of the 421st NFS and six of the 547th stood in stark contrast to the last U.S. night fighter squadron to arrive in the Pacific, the 550th. It flew in combat for eight months with P–38s by day and P–61s by night, without aerial success." The 550th arrived in December 1944. The US did not form night fighter groups in WWII it did have the 481st Night Fighter Training Group "Saipan was also the site of the United States’ first effort at airborne warning and control. Two B–24s of the 27th Bombardment Group equipped with radar sets were to vector P–38s to intercept Japanese aircraft. Unfortunately, the system was never used in combat."
  15. There is an public domain program "Hathi Download Helper" https://sourceforge.net/projects/hathidownloadhelper/ It will download the individual pages and merge them into a PDF file.
  16. There is an public domain program "Hathi Download Helper" https://sourceforge.net/projects/hathidownloadhelper/ It will download the individual pages and merge them into a PDF file.
  17. PBY-5 Pilot's Handbook https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b497657&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021
  18. U-8 Operators manual https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uva.x001631070&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021 U-21 Operators manual https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uva.x004948957&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021 C-12 Operators manual https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uva.x004971102&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021 U-3 Operators manual https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uva.x004971100&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021 US Army aircraft painting and marking, 1986 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uva.x002136582&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021
  19. Avro 504K, 54 pages. https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b318161&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021
  20. N2848 Wellington Ic. Taken on Charge 6 August 1940, 48 MU 13 August, 21 OTU "B" 12 March 1941, 18 OTU "A" 7 May, 43 Group Deposit Account 5 June, 18 OTU "A" 10 September, Repaired on Site? 27 October, 18 OTU 12 November, Struck off Charge 6 February 1942. W.R. Chorley in Bomber Command Losses says the aircraft was on a night cross country exercise, 30/31 January 1942, the aircraft letter was G, no indication if it was carrying the unit codes of XW. It would have had the serial number N2848 painted on it. Encountered icing, one out of the six on board survived, later he was also the sole survivor when his aircraft was shot down. He returned in 1972 and placed a remembrance stone, 246 squadron Air Training Corps are reported to do a yearly visit. It should be a standard Ic in terms of equipment, camouflage and markings as of January 1942, the Ic was still in production at the time.
  21. 202 pages to consult for details. https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015021078814&view=1up&seq=1&skin=2021
  22. No information on squadron codes, some on serial number overlap. AH741 to 880 Tomahawk I, AH881 to 990 Tomahawk Ia,, AH991 to 999 Tomahawk Ib, AK100 to 570 Tomahawk Ib, AM370 to 519 Tomahawk Ib, AN218 to 517 Tomahawk Ib Serial numbers overlapping are therefore 218 to 369 AK or AN, 370 to 517 AK, AM or AN, 518 and 519 AK or AM Assuming I have all the destinations listed correctly, the distribution is, 29 lost at sea between AK218 and AK334, 101 arrived in UK but sent to Russia, between AK242 and AK364, 4 between AK225 and 279 retained in the UK, 100 were sent to China between AK466 and 570, AM375 and 519 (Including AM518 and 9 while 82 had numbers of 517 or less), 49 to Russia between AN469 to 517 Of the 152 duplicate numbers between 218 and 369, 134 (101+29+4) never went to the Middle East, all the AN made it but only AK248, AK249, AK254, AK312, AK346, AK348 to 355, AK365 to 369 Of the 148 triplicate numbers between 370 and 517, 131 (82+49) never went to the Middle East, that works out as follows, AK, AM, AN serials, for 10 numbers none to Middle East 31 numbers one to Middle East 39 numbers two to Middle East 68 numbers all three to Middle East. None, 472, 473, 478, 480, 487, 492, 501, 508, 514, 515 One, AN467, AN468, AK470, AM471, AK475, AK477, AM479, AM481, AK482, AK484, AM486, AK489, AK491, AM493, AK494, AK496 to 499, AM500, AK502, AK504, AK506, AM507, AK509 to 513, AK516, AK517 Two, AK and AN, 375, 381, 388, 395, 402, 409, 416, 423, 429, 431, 433, 435, 437, 439, 441, 443, 445, 447, 449, 451, 453, 455, 457, 458, 460, 462, 463, 465 Two AM and AN, 466 Two AK and AM, 469, 474, 476, 483, 485, 488, 490, 495, 503, 505
  23. Additions and corrections to my earlier message From the Serial Registers, ET1014 ET1015 ET1016 Middle East 30 June 1942, Cat E 22 Oct 1942 (Australian Archives, P/O Garth Angus Neill MIA) ET1017 Middle East 4 July 1942, Cat E 30 Sep 1942 ET1018 Middle East 2 July 1942, Cat E 8 Dec 1942 ET1019 Middle East 29 June 1942 ET1020 Middle East 23 June 1942, Cat E 15 Jul 1942 ET1021 Middle East 3 July 1942, Cat E 2 Apr 1943 ET1022 Middle East 2 July 1942 (Australian Archives, F/Sgt Geoffrey Cook Swinbourne killed, airframe had 356 flying hours, high speed impact) ET1023 Middle East 18 June 1942, Cat E 24 Aug 1942 ET1024 Middle East 28 June 1942, Cat E 27 Sep 1942 ET1025 Middle East 4 July 1942, Lost at Sea 1 Jun 1943 ET1026 Middle East 2 July 1942 ET1027 Middle East 2 July 1942 ET1028 ET1029 Middle East 11 July 1942, Cat E 21 Sep 1942 (Australian Archives, lost on 29 August, P/O Neil Hartley Shillabeer Killed) EV114 to 126, Middle East June 1942, SOC 1 Jan 1947 EV127 to 129, Middle East 14 or 16 May 1942, all marked "in transit", all SOC 1 Jan 1944 EV130 EV131 New Zealand 21 May 1942. From Shores et. al. ET1018 4 SAAF Sqn 4 Nov 1942, 2/Lt. L.D. Sparg PoW, AK711 also lost that day plus damaged/crash landed, ET789, AK633, ET244 ET1025 lost with 2 Sqn SAAF ET1029 lost 29 Aug 1942. 450 squadron unit history mentions July/August/September 1942, ET1013 (typo?, 1 mention), 1018, 1022, 1029, while ET1016, ET1017 (16 Jul), ET1025 were with 3 Squadron On another topic late model P-40 deliveries to South Africa?
  24. Production Spitfire XII October 1942 to September 1943 Spitfire F.VIII November 1942 to September 1943, then 20 in November. Spitfire LF.VIII from May 1943 Spitfire F.XIV from October 1943 Spitfire PR.XIX 22 from April to June 1944, then from October 1944. Spitfire F.21 1 in April 1944 then from July 1944 June 1943 Rotol produces its first 5 blade propellers and 5 blade spinners, then a pause in production until September. From the 1946 Janes, Merlin gearing 0.42 or 0.477 to 1. Griffon gearing II, III, XII, 61 0.451 to 1 IV, 65, 66 0.510 to 1 (and VI?) Propeller diameter, from Morgan and Shacklady VIII, IX, XIV 10 feet 9 inches XII, XIX 10 feet 5 inches XIV 10 feet 4 or 5 inches F.24 11 feet 10 inches
  25. 296 IID, with 44 January to April 1942, the remainder August 1942 to February 1943. All up 209 built to end November 1942, Hurricane IV production started in December 1942, 524 built by end April 1944. HW683, HW747 were the first production mark IV, then from KW792. 43 IID serials identified as to USSR between HW866 and KX866 (the last IID), actually 46 handed over, 14 refused as having too many flying hours. 30 IV to USSR between LE748 and LF596 (the last IV)
×
×
  • Create New...