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Acklington

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  1. Many thanks for the comments everyone. The collar on the canopy was just milliput filler, smoothed to shape before it dried. For the silver/high speed aluminium finish I use "Blackfriar" extra bright silver from the local hardware shop. I've had the same tin for decades, and still two thirds full. It is not a 'natural metal' finish, but can be made to mimic NMF by adding humbrol gloss dark sea grey, plus drops of black or other colours to mimic different metal panels. However, Canberras were never NMF, always silver painted.
  2. Original FROG Canberra PR.7 kit bought and made in 1960. Consigned to 'spares' box by late 1970s, but slowly worked on for next 10 years and fully restored and improved by 1995. The 'flat' mainwheels were cut off and Matchbox B-25 Mitchell wheels added, all raised rivets and panel lines removed, and hinge lines scored in. A 'collar' was added to the rear of the canopy. The original FROG engine cowlings are too bulbous, but have been retained. They are closer to the one-off Sapphire engined experimental version. The colour scheme was chosen to be close to and a tribute to the origina
  3. Many thanks for the comments everyone, and a Happy and safe New Year to all. Also glad to see that the ATC memories rang a bell with so many - a marvellous (and free!) organisation back then.
  4. It's taken me two months to wrestle with this kit, two steps forward and one backwards at every stage! It is a quite ancient offering from Aeroclub, mixed media with vacuform fuselage and very fragile canopy (you also have to cut out and make your own cabin windows and interior); plastic wings, tail and rudder, and white metal parts for everything else. It is, however, pretty accurate and the basic detail is good, although I had to make and add over 50 detailed parts and additions. VM365 Anson C19 (1) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr There is also a 'back story' to this project. I'm in th
  5. Just finished, and a very nice kit, although I'm annoyed with myself for rushing it and not spotting two errors. The spine in front of the fin is too long, and I only realised when trying to fit two aerials in the space between the spine and the rear of the cockpit. I think that the rear cockpit is a bit too long as well. The other fault is the two missing interior canopy pulleys which are very obvious on the real thing, located on the upper fuselage inside the rear canopy. WG220, Durham UAS, RAF Ouston, 1955 (21) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr WG220, Durham UAS, RAF Ouston, 1955 (17) w
  6. Many thanks for the comments everyone. One issue I didn't mention was the font style for the large serials and code letters. None of the Xtradecal or Modeldecal sheets I had matched the 'square' style of the real thing. I'd almost given up when I found a long forgotten sheet of RAF inter-war numbers and letters which were almost spot on. The only thing missing was the letter 'M' which was not used between the wars. Also the code number '8' could only be achieved by adding an up-side-down '3' on top of another '3'.
  7. I started this at the same time as my previous Martinet (Magna Models). The Pavla one is also a limited production kit, mainly plastic, but with resin parts and vacuform canopy. It appears nicely detailed in the box, but everything goes rapidly downhill from there on. It is the wonkiest model I've ever made - nothing is straight! And I did try hard to thin the wingtips, not that you'd notice ........ MS924, APS Acklington, 1949 (3) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr MS924, APS Acklington, 1949 (10) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr MS924, APS Acklington, 1949 (15) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr
  8. Many thanks everyone. I've been left with nothing but admiration for the TTO (Towed Target Operator) in the back seat. The 'seat' folds up against the right fuselage wall, the shoulder harness being strung from a beam across the rear of the cockpit. After take-off the TTO gets down on the floor where there is a permanent very large hole, and he sticks his arm out to thread the cable and attach the drogue, which I assume is in the 'target box' between the exhausts. He then operates the propellor/winch device, with the drum of steel cable being mounted sideways inside his cockpit, at
  9. I've had this resin kit unmade for decades, but finally gave it a go. There are only about eight lumps of resin main parts (some were warped), plus rather crude metal bits for the various details. There are no decals provided. The poorly detailed vacuform canopy I swapped for the spare vacuform canopy from the Pavla Martinet kit. Considerable trimming was required to fit it to the Magna model as the Pavla one has part of the fuselage structure incorporated into the canopy moulding. The metal Magna propellor was also made to rotate, with difficulty. HP147, Ouston Station Flight, e
  10. Many thanks for the fulsome comments, it has been an uplifting experience! The two Hurricane photos are the ones I used, as the aircraft wears the 'YE' codes of 289 Squadron. However I'm not convinced that its serial number is Z4048, which has a different official history? Mating the two noses I had been warned about beforehand. So I took a lot of care to make sure all the internal and external parts were cleaned of flash. There doesn't appear to be much flash on modern Airfix kits, but the fit of parts is so precise that even the smallest ridge of flash along a se
  11. Just finished the Airfix Bristol Blenheim Mk.IV, but not without difficulty. This was due to trying a new (to me) make of acrylic matt varnish, which reacted badly to what was underneath it. I did some test paints on spare plastic beforehand, but the problem didn't show up till the real thing. Z5880, 289 Sqdn det, Ouston, c 1943 (1) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Z5880, 289 Sqdn det, Ouston, c 1943 (2) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Z5880, 289 Sqdn det, Ouston, c 1943 (6) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Z5880, 289 Sqdn det, Ouston, c 1943 (9) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Z5880, 2
  12. This is an early Blenheim Mk.1, L1525, of 3 Radio Servicing Section 72 Wing at RAF Ouston, Northumberland in October 1940. The airfield was not officially opened until March 1941, but 3 RSS moved in far earlier and flew off the grass areas from 13th October 1940. L1525 didn't last long, and crashed on take-off from RAF Horsham St.Faith (now Norwich Airport) on 24th October 1940, the three crew were injured but safe. L1525, 3 RSS 72 Wing, Ouston, October 1940 (20) by Philip Pain, on Flickr L1525, 3 RSS 72 Wing, Ouston, October 1940 (34) by Philip Pain, on Flickr L1525, 3 R
  13. Many thanks to all for the comments. The 'runway' was some left over 'wallpaper' from a dolls house, which I stuck on a board. The 'grass' was from a roll of stick-on grass, probably for a railway layout. The airfield markings I added myself. It is all starting to fade in the sunlight, which wasn't too bad for my 'winter' photos, but now that Spring is here I ought to green up the grass! And as for "adey m"s comment above, I'll never look at the Vampire the same again!
  14. Following on from last month's Revell 1/72 Vampire FB.5, I carried on and have just finished a second one. Mainly because I don't like Vampires, or models of them, so the sooner it was out of the way the better! For this model I used one of the decal options from the Modeldecal Vampire sheet. VZ305, RLS, 607 & 608 Sqdns, Ouston, 1954-5 (11) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VZ305, RLS, 607 & 608 Sqdns, Ouston, 1954-5 (14) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VZ305, RLS, 607 & 608 Sqdns, Ouston, 1954-5 (15) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VZ305, RLS, 607 & 608 S
  15. Finished yesterday, this is the Revell kit boxed as a Vampire F.3 but containing the necessary parts for a FB.5 or FB.9. The kits sprues show that it originated as an MPM kit. Goes together nicely although I had to remove some of the interior to create room for a large lump of lead. There are Modeldecal and Xtradecal sets of Vampire decals available, so a wide range of different RAF Vampires can be modelled. VV617, A, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, c 1955 (14) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VV617, A, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, c 1955 (12) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VV617, A, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, c 1955 (8
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