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Acklington

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  1. Many thanks for the comments everyone, but no masking was done on the canopies, I hand paint them. Each bar is done in turn, interior undercoat first, and usually a right mess! My salvation comes from a clean brush dipped in white spirit, carefully removing offending paint to get (more or less) to a straight line. Harvard canopies - a job I absolutely hate!
  2. Finished a couple of days ago, this is the latest addition to RAF Ouston's Harvards, a Revell 1/72 T-6G Texan kit, converted to an RAF Harvard. The work involves making a longer rear end to the canopy, using an Airfix Canadian Chipmunk canopy, plus using the old Airfix Harvard kit long exhaust, removing the various hard points for the Texan's weapons, and various small detail changes. KF193, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, Sept 1951 (3) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr KF193, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, Sept 1951 (10) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr KF193, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, Sept 1951 (12) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr KF193, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, Sept 1951 (14) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr KF193, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, Sept 1951 (22) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr KF193, 607 Sqdn, Ouston, Sept 1951 (26) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr It is finished as KF193, one of three Harvards used by the Spitfire equipped 607 (County of Durham) Squadron at RAF Ouston, and seen in the colours it wore at the September 1951 RAF Acklington Battle of Britain display. RAF Ouston's Harvards could fill a book, and the following photos show the schemes built so far - 22 SFTS KF314 'FCIT' all yellow in 1946 - KF373 'RAN-A' still in wartime camo, ex-22 SFTS but now 607 Squadron's first aircraft in 1947 - and KF193, also ex-22 SFTS but repainted in modern post-war colours with 607's new code letters 'LA' following transfer from Reserve Command to Fighter Command in 1951. KF193 did not wear the usual post-war yellow 'T' bands on wings and rear fuselage, and the position of its fuselage roundel shows that it never had done. Ouston Harvards (1) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Ouston Harvards (2) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Ouston Harvards (4) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Ouston Harvards (7) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr I've identified two further schemes which will follow in due course - FX280 'RAN-B' all yellow, 'C' type roundels; and wartime camo/yellow 'FCJA' of 22 SFTS, serial nor yet found. I'm also searching for an example in post-war silver/yellow 'T' bands, but no luck with a photo so far. Durham UAS is a likely contender. Any help with photo sources would be greatly appreciated! Thanks for looking.
  3. I've now posted photos in the 'ready for inspection' thread, here
  4. Following on from the WIP thread for this kit, here are photos of the completed model VP974, 11 Gp CF, Ouston, 1961 (3) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VP974, 11 Gp CF, Ouston, 1961 (5) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VP974, 11 Gp CF, Ouston, 1961 (10) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VP974, 11 Gp CF, Ouston, 1961 (17) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr VP974, 11 Gp CF, Ouston, 1961 (19) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr It is finished as a DH.104 Devon C.1 , VP974, of 11 Group Communications Flight at RAF Ouston, Northumberland in 1961. It had previously served with 13 Group CF which was at Ouston from 1955. In the late 1960's VP974 was converted to a Devon C.2 in which role it served until scrapped in 1980. Thanks for looking.
  5. Been putting the twiddly bits on it, nearly finished Devon C1 (14) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Devon C1 (13) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr The finished photos will be posted on the 'ready for inspection' thread in the next couple of days.
  6. Many thanks for the comments everyone. The seating arrangement can be seen in the second photo (above) of the real thing - the rear four seats are clearly facing forwards. Thanks also for the 1980's internal colour scheme, although by that date they had been converted to Devon C.2's and completely refurbished. All the interior views that I can find on the web are surviving Dove/Devons that have similarly been upgraded. None of this really helps with a 1950's / 1960's Devon, and if anyone is contemplating doing an earlier Devon, beware the multitude of evolving radio aerials (which also affected the canopy thing on top); the changing external 'lumps & bumps'; the original port elevator shape (rounded end); and the engine cowlings / exhausts - some Devons had the upgraded engines, but not the canopy mods. I've also spotted nosewheel mudguards on some!
  7. Finally solved my white-outlined serial number problem, having reached the point of nearly giving up. Found a very old sheet of "Almark" serial numbers and letters, they were always too thin and puny to be of use. So applied first were normal Xtradecal white serials, which were left to dry overnight. Then the Almark black serials were applied on top, not perfect, but close enough to give the right impression. Devon C1 (12) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr So I can now crack on and finish the model.
  8. I'm currently doing this Devon, but I'm stuck on how to do the fuselage serials VP974 with a white outline. Help please! If at all possible, thank you. VP974, Odiham, Sept 1964, Mike Hines photo by Philip Pain, on Flickr
  9. Couple more photos of WIP, and showing the complicated masking required. The worst is yet to come! Devon C1 (9) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Devon C1 (10) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Many thanks for the comments above, but I'm still hoping for some help with the white-outlined fuselage serials. Any suggestions please?
  10. This model is the next addition to my RAF Ouston project, and this is not intended to be a full work-in-progress thread. Rather I'm hoping that some kind viewer can help me out with the markings. Please! Here is the progress so far; Devon C1 (1) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr I also bought the "Transport Wings" resin Dove & Devon Seats TWC72041 set, as Amodel does not include an interior for the cabin. This photo shows the completed interior, although the colour scheme and internal arrangement for an early RAF Devon C.1 is something of a mystery! Two words of warning; the seats seem somewhat over-size, leaving no room for an internal aisle. This does not matter too much, as it is the side view through the cabin windows that is important. But in this respect the seat are also too high, and if I did this again I would set the scratch built floor lower. Also "Transport Wings" include templates for the floor and rear bulkhead, but the floor template is too narrow, and the rear bulkhead far too small. Devon C1 (4) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr I chose matt dark blue floor covering, medium sea grey side walls, matt white interior roofing, and dark blue leather seats. The photo of the real aircraft (below) seems to show a 'club-style' front seating layout, and other references state that the RAF Devon was a 7-seater, with J-type dingy occupying seat eight up-front (?). Devon C1 (8) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Another mystery is the 'white' cockpit roof on some Doves and Devons. Some have it, some not, and then I realised that it is an internal sun-blind that is pulled forward as required. But I could not find any detailed photos, particularly to show if it is one blind, or two seperate ones, each side. I opted for one large blind, which does not go right to the back, there is a gap. VP974, FTCCS, Blackbushe, 31 May 59, Robin A Walker photo by Philip Pain, on Flickr VP974, Odiham, Sept 1964, Mike Hines photo by Philip Pain, on Flickr And here are the two photos I have been able to find of my chosen subject, VP974 of 13 and 11 Groups, RAF Ouston, early 60's. I could not have selected a more difficult Devon scheme!! Highly polished metal, with the dark blue trim outlined in very thin white. Worse still, the fuselage serial VP974 is outlined in white. This serial is where I'm hoping that someone can help me? I don't have the equipment to design and print my own decal for this fuselage serial, nor does it seem worth getting it just for this small job. So if any kind soul would be willing to help, I'd be most grateful, and happy to pay any costs. Thank you.
  11. Many thanks for the comments, they are much appreciated. I use humbrol enamels to paint with, all hand painted. Although I'm not too happy with their newer tins, which seem designed for spraying? Some colours take days to dry properly. The colours in each tin also seem to vary quite a bit. The Gladiator cowling was a bit difficult and fiddly to get right. Even more so was the propellor and its mount, which seemed impossible to glue in place without the prop being glued solid! I eventually held it in place and applied a microscopic bit of liquid glue at a time, checking each time that it still turned. I had also made a new shaft for the propellor, to give it more substance. As for the rigging, I now need the services of a counsellor! I first super-glued each nylon thread to the underside (pre-painted) of the top wing, having drilled deeper holes. The centre section rigging I took right through the top wing, repairing the damage afterwards. The bottom wing (upper surface) was also pre-painted, and all the holes drilled right through. After the wings and struts were in place I threaded the rigging through the lower wing holes and super-glued them tight. Again, repairing all the visible damage on the undersurface, afterwards. This is really not an ideal method, but the rigging is strong, which is what I wanted.
  12. Just finished, the latest addition to my RAF Ouston project, Gloster Gladiator Mk.1 K6132 of 13 Group Communications Flight, RAF Ouston, Northumberland, April 1941. K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (4) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (7) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (9) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (12) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (13) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (18) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (21) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (22) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (28) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132, 13 Group Comms Flight, Ouston, April 1941 (30) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr And here is how the model looked during construction! K6132, rigging St Johns, Oct 19 w by Philip Pain, on Flickr This is a recent Airfix kit, so accurate and nicely detailed. Nevertheless it did fight me most of the way to completion! Also the Mk.1 didn't have the under-cowling oil cooler intake, so this was removed and the gaps plugged. K6132 was only the fourth Gladiator built, and initially served with 72 Squadron at Church Fenton. There it became the mount of James Nicholson, who subsequently went on to win the only Fighter Command VC of the war. It was while he was flying it that the Munich Crisis led to K6132 being hastily and somewhat crudely camouflaged, and it adopted the codes 'RN-S', serial number probably deleted. There is a photo of Nicholson flying it as such. 72 converted to Spitfires, and K6132 was one of three Gladiators allocated to 13 Group's communication flight in April 1941. The Group HQ was in Newcastle, and the three Gladiators became the first aircraft to use the still incomplete RAF Ouston, flying off the grass areas. After a year or so with 13 Group, K6132 moved on to the RAE at Farnborough, where it survived until 1945, probably the oldest Gladiator to see the end of the war. "Three Gladiators", sounds a bit like 'Faith, Hope, and Charity', but in Geordieland they would have been "Pet"; "The Lads"; and "Man" (as in 'wi i man!'). K6132, Valentines Postcard w by Philip Pain, on Flickr K6132 was also used for a set of photos taken by "The Aeroplane" pre-war, and the view shown was made into a Valentines Postcard (my own collection). It is thus the most common image of a Gladiator to be found on the internet. For the colour scheme I have assumed the 'Munich' camouflage (without shadow compensation shading), with 1940 sky undersides. Then during the winter of 1940/41 the 'half black' under wings recognition markings were re-introduced on fighters, until ordered to be removed on 22 April 1941. So perhaps these were the only Ouston-based aircraft ever to wear (very briefly) this recognition feature. I have also just attached the prop spinner with blu-tac, as many Gladiators flew without a spinner. Thanks for looking.
  13. Many thanks for the comments everyone, they are much appreciated. I mixed the exhaust ring colour using bright silver, bit of gold, and matt black. Gave it a good buffing once dry.
  14. Here's an old kit, I must have had this unmade model since 1980, or earlier. P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (6) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (10) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (12) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (14) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (15) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (26) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (28) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr P9099, 13 Group AACU, Ouston, June 1941 (35) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr The kit is basically accurate and goes together well. However there are many details missing, so I added an instrument panel, control stick, cowling brace supports, aerials, guns, better light bomb carriers, rear windows (to see the balance weights), landing lights, and pitot tube. It is an addition to my RAF Ouston, Northumberland project, and throughout the war Ouston was a base for target training aircraft for the many AA guns defending Tyneside. Sadly, however, photos are zilch, so once again I have had to make assumptions regarding the colours and markings. Lysander Mk.II P9099 is known to have served with no less than three of the target units at Ouston, starting in May 1941 with 7 Anti Aircraft Co-operation Unit; then 13 Group Target Towing Flight, which later became 289 Squadron. None of these units had code letters allocated at Ouston, and neither did the aircraft have individual ID markings, other than the serial number. I have assumed that in its earlier days P9099 might have remained close to its former operational configuration and colours, as it was only used to calibrate the AA guns for height and speed. It was not a 'target towing' aircraft. However, in 1942 it left Ouston to be converted to a TT Mk.II, at which point it no doubt adopted black & yellow target towing stripes. It was then issued to 41 OTU at Old Sarum, before being crated for shipping to the Middle East. It never made it, being lost at sea en-route in January 1943. So somewhere on a seabed it still resides, although the official 'loss date' of 8th January 1943 does not match any recorded shipping losses on that date. It is perhaps the date the paperwork was done, not when the ship sank?
  15. Many thanks for the comments everyone, they are much appreciated. And could I just add that the range of a Hurricane Mk.1 came from the Putman book "Hawker Aircraft since 1920" by Mason. Regarding the 'stevej60' quote (above), I've just tried googling 'Gustav Pultiz' but nothing relevant came up. Do you have any further details steve? I'd be interested. Also, I can appreciate your frustration re finding 55 OTU code letters, with three constituent 'squadrons' to choose from, 'UW'; 'EH'; and 'PA'. The OTU did seem to specialise in Slav pilots (Czechs and Poles), so there might be surviving logbooks in those countries, if you google in the correct language? For example, I was getting nowhere trying to find photos of Ouston based Miles Masters, until, as a longshot and knowing that several went to France when 80 OTU closed, I tried googling in various schoolboy versions of the french language, and bingo! And the french hadn't even repainted them after delivery!
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