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John W Reid

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About John W Reid

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    Very Obsessed Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Canada

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  1. The bottom wing layout is the same as the top except for the engine/pilot area.
  2. I painted the bird all white and the base all black as I wanted to direct the viewer's attention to the overall piece not just how the feathers were done or how it was painted. The Flyer will be its natural wood color with black fittings. I don't want any distracting brass fittings showing.
  3. This is my interpretation of a female Peregrine falcon.I have used some artistic license here.This is a puffed up bird as we often see them in the winter in Canada she is doing this in order to ward off the cold.Her crop is obviously full and she is relaxed and kind of just surveying the sky.I have accentuated these factors as I wanted to show the power and strength and mood of the bird.I have given her a curious look which I will explain later.The female is a third larger than the male among raptors, they believe that this may because she needs the extra strength for egg laying and tending to her youngsters.
  4. Later I will experiment with forced perspective by sitting the bird on my garden table and the Flyer on the clothesline
  5. This is about where I am now with the Flyer.
  6. I want my Flyer 2 to be in Dayton after the initial flights at Kitty Hawk. This was a functional airplane capable of sustained flight where a Peregrine may have encountered the Flyer for the first time.
  7. The Peregrine is what you may call the worlds first fighter. He usually attacks his prey in what is called a stoop, out of the sun, diving at over 200MPH not always in a straight on attack but often at an angle timing his strike on the fly. He rolls his claw into a ball and strikes knocking his prey off its flight path continuing he then catches his prey in mid-air with his claws. Anyone who has witnessed this believes that it is one of the greatest displays of flight that they have ever seen.
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