Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Paul821

Gold Member
  • Content Count

    236
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

647 Excellent

About Paul821

  • Rank
    Established Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Essex, England
  • Interests
    20th c conflict in Eastern Counties of England

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Robert - unfortunately the choice of colours is slighting restricted as will be seen from the latest build picture The difference between the wagons is that the one of the left is fitted with "continuous brakes" that is the brakes are held off through the presence of a vacuum in the braking system. The vacuum is created by the engine and piped through the train. If air is let into the system then the brakes will come on. The wagon on the right does not have any such system and the only brakes are applied manually (in theory when the wagon is at a halt. The moving wagon can only be brought to a halt by brakes being applied elsewhere on the train - the engine or brake van. The reason that this dictates colour is that the LNER adopted colour coding for its wagons: vacuum brakes ones were painted Brown red oxide / Bauxite, while unfitted were Grey. This coding was adopted by the nationalised railways and could be seen until all trains became air braked - that is a different story. The alternative would be to have painted one of them as a Private Owner wagon, but war time photos of such wagons are rare and I known bauxite and grey are the correct colours.
  2. Today sees a double update as the phot shows the Vimy and Gypsy Moth together to illustrate the differing approach's to getting the struts in place. In both cases, what seemed to be the most secure sub-assembly (the engines for the Vimy, or structs (the V shaped fuselage struts in the Moth) have been chosen as the initial fixing points.. When the glue has cured I am hoping in both cases that this approach will allow the upper wing to be glued in place and then the remaining struts attached.
  3. It's been a busy 24 hours in the Frog GB as this build slipped to the second page in less than a day. Today sees a double update as the phot shows the Vimy and Gypsy Moth together to illustrate the differing approach's to getting the struts in place. In both cases, what seemed to be the most secure sub-assembly (the engines for the Vimy, or structs (the V shaped fuselage struts in the Moth) have been chosen as the initial fixing points.. When the glue has cured I am hoping in both cases that this approach will allow the upper wing to be glued in place and then the remaining struts attached.
  4. but it was well worth the entrance fee (I did not do the entire tour). Excellent range of exhibits and trade stands. I did resits the temptation to by up all the Frogspawn on offer to boost my builds in the Frog Squad GB. Did not read your post of yesterday so came and went anonymously, but the greeting at the door was friendly.
  5. @PeterB thanks for both the above comment and the shot and the pic' of the Bristol M1C. Anyway onwards with the Chocolate and Cream build, when writing this post I realised I should have shown the underside The two rulers clamped to the workbench are and attempt to get the first four struts firmly attached to the engines and at the right spacing and angles. Parallel to my various GB build's I am also building the new Airfix Phantom and one thing I have become aware of is the tolerances in old and new kits, At nearly every stage the Phantom has required parts to be clamped due to extremely tight fitting of other pre-built modules. To date the Vimy has gone together with no issues at all.
  6. @helios16v - With the Jetstream back in the Airfix catalogue this year - and the value of the one in my stash about to fall - would an OOB build in USAF colours be acceptable, it seems to meet your criteria. If so I would be happy to have my name added to potential participants.
  7. @CliffB thanks for the comments about colours - however I think I'll stick with the teenage me on this one and built the model as I might have in the 1960's. For a railway modeller chocolate & cream either means Great Western or Pullman coaches. It just happens that my paint stash includes the relevant Humbrol Railway acrylics. This might not please any Britmodeller purists but it is what I would have done in the past. Also it avoids the hassle of purchasing two more paints that might only be used one. We often talk about out kit stash, but I have over 100 paint containers I have collected over the years, many only used for one kit. Today's work was mainly spraying primer - the rain holding off long enough to do this outside.
  8. Back at the start of the Frog GB I mentioned my lack of experience of rigging - which has led to a dearth of biplanes in my adult builds (that is over the last 50 years!). Having committed to 4 bi-planes in the GB I am now at the stage where I cannot escape the mysterious craft known as rigging. Having obtained some E.Z. line I tried an experiment: I am happy with that result all I now have to do is repeat it about 100 times on my various builds. Having solved the dihedral issue the next issue is getting struts to stand upright.
  9. Paul821

    Blackburn Shark

    It's tips and learning from the experience of @825 @bigbadbadge and @AdrianMF that is proving the value of me holding back on my build. Keep up the good work chaps.
  10. Although it is sometimes pot luck as to what you will find - the National Archives have digitised many Squadron records for example https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D7489508 for £3.50 gives some details about one pilot from 3 Squadron on 8th June. The free preview of the document might give you what you want. Unless you know exactly what you are looking for sometimes the National Archives search facility can require a lot of scrolling though records.
  11. To answer @CliffB Even within GB's I try to stick to my collections policy of East Anglian Aircraft. In squadron service the Vimy was a rare site in the area with only no's 7 & 99 squadrons being based at Bircham Newton The box provides for two schemes However Martlesham Heath, in my area and home of the Experimental Aircraft Flight, saw most types of aircraft either based there - or passing through - during the1920's and '30's with a number of Vmy's included. However neither of the box examples are listed in Kinsey's book on Martlesham. I am going for H651 as it is an experimental aircraft and there is the off chance that it might have flown to Martlesham on a test flight. Also I don't think I have ever used "chocolate" as a paint before on any aircraft.
  12. This evening has been tackling dihedral issues on bi-planes. It it's build thread I have described my approach to the Vimy but the Moth required a different approach. Despite the dihedral on the Gypy Moth's upper and lower wings being different, Frog made all the struts the same height. Therefore I clamped the upper wing to a piece of wood, and used, yet more coffee stirrers to establish the dihedral, the fuselage and the lower winds were then laced behind to achieve the same dihedral. As with the Vimy this will now be left so set.
  13. As the Proctor is now in the Gallery and one of the Gypsy Moths is progressing well, the Vimy is now on the workbench, that is rather too tidy to be my work bench! All the parts seem present and my first task was to tackle the dihedral on the wings. The idea was to fix the lower wings to a piece of wood, and then overlay the three sections of the upper wing on top. I used a sheet of greaseproof paper to avoid sticking the upper and lower wings together, This how I left the wings - tomorrow morning I will see if it has worked. Busy evening as I also tackled the dihedral on the Moth
  14. First duplicate - although this is an original Frog version - the 2nd Proctor Although the transfer are over 50 years old, they went on perfectly It is rare for me to mount a model on a stand but in this case I feel the stand is a integral part of the build.
  15. Although a simple kit, because of the ABS plastic I tend to leave the joints to cure for a reasonable time. But today the wagons at least moved to their natural environment still some way to go though..
×
×
  • Create New...