Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Lootenant Aloominum

Members
  • Content Count

    54
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

180 Excellent

About Lootenant Aloominum

  • Rank
    New Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    UK

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Thanks guys. It certainly is a larger airplane than its sleek lines seem to indicate. Not as bulky as an F-4, but longer and bigger, if that makes sense. Anyways, my air-to-air photos are up! Web page: https://everardcunion.com/plastic-models-2/plastic-models-contemporary-with-vietnam/forgers-f-106-in-1-72nd-scale/#top
  2. This continues to inspire me, along with many models and dioramas on this forum. It brings back to life a world as it was so long ago, yet it was in many folks' grandparents' time. (And in my parents' time, just.)
  3. Early on in the Eclipse project someone said he wasn’t sure you could aero-tow a delta wing. Mark Stucky spoke up. “I know you can because I’ve done it.” He explained that he had aero-towed in hang gliders many times. See Forger’s F-106 in 1/72nd scale.
  4. Thanks. I looked up the reviews on Goodreads and I have ordered a copy. Goodreads reviews: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8840.Saint_Exup_ry It occurs to me that another way of avoiding the problems of the RS Models kit, while taking advantage of its superb decal sheet, but of course retaining the small scale, is to buy a better 1/72nd scale kit of the fighter version and convert the nose -- maybe using the RS camera nose. (Somewhat expensive, of course.) We live and learn... :-/ I console myself that mine looks ten times better to the naked eye (well, my eyes anyway) than it does in the photos, which on an average computer monitor show it larger than it is and seem to highlight all the rough edges and mistakes.
  5. Why do we do it to ourselves? Maybe it is the modern equivalent of cave painting. In retrospect, maybe a better way would be to use a 1/48th scale kit of the equivalent fighter version, fill in the gun ports, and use black paint for the camera ports, maybe with a bit of filler and filing to create the squared off contour under the nose. French roundels are obtainable and the fin flashes would not be difficult to paint. The tricky bit would be the intricate paint work on the nose.
  6. Magnificent. A short while ago where I live they had a model exhibition featuring several P-47s in various scales, all olive drab examples of the 'razor back' type that were based at Christchurch airfield, Hampshire (now Dorset) in 1943 or '44. One 1/48th scale one was so intricately detailed and realistic, it is what I call 'museum quality.' This one is at least its equal, it seems to me. All the more remarkable given its 1/72nd scale.
  7. Lightning fit for a little prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s Lockheed P-38/F5 Lightning in 1/72nd scale (RS Models kit):
  8. Lightning fit for a little prince: https://everardcunion.com/plastic-models-2/world-war-2-plastic-models-part-2/lightning-fit-for-a-little-prince/#top This once common scale, 1/72nd scale, really is too small for aircraft of this size, in my opinion. I find that I can hardly hold the smaller parts and, if I drop one on the floor, it is gone for good. (Notice the absence of the underside elevator mass balance.) A couple of related topics on this forum... Antoine De Saint-Exupery: 1re escadrille du GR 2/33, F-5 lightning colors?
  9. I added a new section titled Breakage and repair at the bottom of the page, including a few new pics, such as this one: https://everardcunion.com/plastic-models-2/plastic-models-land-vehicles/motocross-in-miniature/#top
  10. Miniart 1/35th scale WW2 drivers. He is the only British driver in the set. (I have seen US Marine Corps Duck crewmen, but they are standing.) The space in the cab is indeed tight, which is why the steering wheel is positioned too high. It is not connected to anything (I omitted the steering shaft) except the driver's hands. Bummer. And British Army Duck crews seemed to usually wear leather gherkins (whatever they are called) which he does not have, although I have seen, on this forum, some museum-quality builds of this kit with correctly attired crew. (I added that info to my web page.)
  11. You mean with a mulberry harbour off shore, LCTs disgorging Sherman tanks, dead horses at the roadside, and some guy repairing a flat tyre while a section of Hawker Typhoons lets loose with their air-to-ground rockets? Hell, yes! It is top of my list in the next life! :haha:
  12. Italeri 1/35th scale General Motors DUKW with Master Box 1/35th scale World War 2 era women and Tamiya 1/35th scale World War 2 British soldiers: More photos and build info on my web site: https://everardcunion.com/plastic-models-2/plastic-models-land-vehicles/plastic-dukw/
  13. They are a pain to do, but a lot easier than adding an electric motor and battery... OK, thanks. I updated my web page with that info.
  14. After moving much furniture and using a portable lamp, I found the spinner in hidden a place where it was not visible prior to moving the furniture. Moreover, I do not understand how it got there just by dropping and bouncing. It is almost as if these parts behave like sub-atomic particles, ‘tunneling’ wave-like through other objects, to re-emerge solid in the new location. Anyway, here is the real thing in flight: And here is mine in black-and-white: The photo of real thing is without the strakes on the upper wing surfaces and also without yellow strips on the outer leading edges, which might indicate that it is one of several mark one Spitfires fitted experimentally with 20 millimetre cannon in 1940. Anybody know?
×
×
  • Create New...