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Jo NZ

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About Jo NZ

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Whanganui NZ
  • Interests
    Competition cars

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  1. Brilliant damage. Now it's got a reason to be there. Next how about some engine blocks? The way that steel castings used to be de-stressed was to leave them outside to "weather". It was beneficial to the blocks to add nitrogen in a liquid form, usually by spraying them occasionally with a yellowish liquid. Something for the diorama, or am I being too obscure??
  2. It needs to be a bigger dent than just drilling out rivets and re-skinning - i.e. not worth rebuilding. Slightly banana shaped (catch fencing pole in the side?) would be good.
  3. It's a bit like building flat pack furniture! Don't forget to check the fit on the chassis before you go any further.
  4. In a scrap dump you would probably have a bent monocoque too - and a couple of broken suspension arms, etc.
  5. Talbot/Lotus Sunbeam? You should be able to chop one from an Avenger. That's what Chrysler did....
  6. I hope that youy will consider, as with other Pochers, offering the engine (and gearbox?) as a separate kit. The totally iconic Cosworth DFV/Hewland FG400...
  7. Here it is at Leavesden. I think this is the real one. Shiny shiny
  8. Drowned? possibly recessed. If it was in it's own little tube it would be "Frenched"
  9. A couple of pointers (which I've mentioned before). As the body is cast as flat sections, it needs to be properly aligned. When I built this (I think I made two) I CA'd the body together on top of the completed chassis. It doesn't always go right first time, but you get the near instant assembly with CA. If you don't like the alignment, dunk it in hot water and it will fall apart. When you are happy with it, back up all the joins with epoxy, and use a reinforcing strip (e.g. fibreglass tissue) if you're really paranoid. The white metal is fairly soft, and the body is he
  10. Sadly out of production. When it first appeared (1987 or thereabouts) the shape looked really good. There were two versions - a standard 427 and a 427 S/C.
  11. Endurance cars need to indicate when they’re going to pit...
  12. As it's American, maybe the rear indicators are flashing brake lights?
  13. I think that I would Loctite the door handles (Studlock will never break) rather than solder them....
  14. I agree that the fit is really good - if you dry fit the bodywork it's nigh on perfect - until you paint it, and then nothing fits....
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