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One-Two

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About One-Two

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  1. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Gunsights. For the eduard A5 I'm using the resin gunsight from Quickboost (Revi 12 C/D). So much better than any standard plastic part! I also assembled the upper part of the IP with the IP coamning and with the gunsight. For the Hasegawa A4 I'm using the spare gunsight from the Eduard A5. Although not great, the eduard part is better than Hasegawa one...and since the A4 will be canopy-closed, I figured that it won't be so visible anyway.
  2. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    I was not happy with the way in which both Eduard and Hasegawa choice for representing the ejection ports tor the nose-mounted MG17’s spent cartridges. Of course, Eduard’s part is much more complete represented, but both of them failed to properly represent the ejection ports, which are molded as solid plastic. The ejection ports are fully visible through the wheel wells and they should look some kind of rectangular ports, not like a solid piece of plastic, as shown in the picture. Therefore I modified both of them and now I think they look more realistic. Thanks for looking and regards,
  3. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Hi there. Some progress on the Eduard A5. I installed the front bulkhead and I must say that this seems to be one of the most important stages of assembling this kit. The Eduard assembly instructions say that we should first glue together the 3 components of the engine compartment bulkhead (I4+L16+I21) then, after these 3 are forming a single sub-assembly, they should be sandwiched between the fuselage sides, together with the tail wheel and the cockpit. I already deviated from the eduard instructions, because I glued the fuselage sides first (only with the tail wheel) an added the cockpit later on, and I think that it is better like this with assembling the firewall also. After much dry-fitting I found that all the attempts in grafting the entire assembly formed by I4+L16+I21 (as a single sub-assembly) to the fuselage are most likely to cause later problems in fitting the wing and the rest of the parts from the engine compartment. The angle between the 3 pieces composing the firewall is not so simple to obtain (I think it is something like 95 degrees) and even if one gets it right, the fitting is a nightmare. Therefore the best solution I have found and which worked out almost perfectly for me was: - first dry fit with parts I4 and L16 on their intended places on the fuselage. Check which is the proper angle for them, in order not to interfere with all other parts like cockpit, fuselage sides, wing fit, etc; - once this position was established, I glued together I4 with L16 and let them to dry hard on this position. At this stage, I4+L16 are not yet glued on their final position on the fuselage, but they form a sub-assembly together, at the best possible angle; - then again some dry fit and apply glue in order to glue the I4+L16 assembly in its intended place; - then dry fit again to see the best angle for part I21 (check fit for all parts which will come in contact with I21, like fuselage sides, I4+L16 assembly, instrument panel coaming, windshield, etc.); - glued I21 in this position, once the best angle was determined. This way I have obtained very good fit, although initial dry fit testing according to steps shown in the assembly instructions was indicating terrible/very poor fit. This stage is crucial, because any mistake here, no matter how small, will ruin the entire kit. The tolerances are very small and any error with the firewall will cause even worse problems all around it (wing to fuselage join, entire engine compartment, etc.). Dry fit, dry fit and again dry fit seems to be the key word for this kit. However, I must say that once I understood the best way to solve the problem, I was amazed to see how well is the kit coming together. Once you get it, the fit is very precise, despite the complexity of the kit. Thanks for looking guys and have a nice w/e.
  4. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Not much of a progress, I only managed to install the cockpit in the fuselage of the Eduard A5. Nothing special to report, only that I had to adjust (sand it a little bit) the front-end of the cockpit floor, in order to get a perfect fit. If left as it was, the cockpit would have fit just ok inside the fuselage, but it would have pushed a little bit on its sides, enough to affect the fit of the firewall and of the wing root.
  5. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Both Eduard and Hasegawa assembly instructions are telling that in order to close the fuselage sides you first have to install first the tail wheel, the cockpit and the firewall (for Eduard) or tailwheel and cockpit (Hase). However following some dry fitting I discovered that the cockpits/firewall can be installed at a later stage with no problem. So I deviated a little bit from the assembly instructions from this point of view. One of the very few (I think) accuracy problems for the old-tool Eduard 190A kit is the thickness of the vertical stabilizer. To my eye, the tail is too chunky if left as it is…so I fixed the problem by sanding material form the both “lips” of the vertical stabilizer’s leading edge. The resulting gap, once closed/glued, solved the chunkiness problem just ok. I also modified a little bit the position for both of the tail wheels, because they seem to me too tall. The opening for the gunsight on the Hasegawa fuselage is too small…so I enlarged it in order to accommodate the gunsight. The gunsight provided by Hasegawa is ridiculous, so I have to find a replacement. The ventilation grills from behind the engine are molded in open position on Hasegawa A4, which is nice, but I had to thin them on the inside, because they are far too thick. That’s it for the moment. Thanks for looking and cheers to all,
  6. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Cockpits almost ready. For Hasegawa A4 I’m using the replacement IP from Yahu Models, together with some leftovers from the Eduard kit. The Yahu replacing IP is pre-painted, very nice and simple to install (single piece, it not the sandwich type), but the problem is that once the canopy is closed (As I’m planning for Hase A4), almost nothing will be visible, So if you have Hasegawa Wurgers and plan to make them with closed cockpits, then the plastic in the box is more than adequate. For Eduard A5 I used the provided PE pre-painted instrument panel (sandwich-type). I modified the stick in order to put it in a more dynamic position…of course later on I have to install the aerodynamic surfaces accordingly.
  7. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Just a little bit of detail painting in the cockpits...then some oil wash followed by Tamiya flat. For Eduard A5 I'm using the dedicated PE set, on Hasegawa A4 I'm using a generic Luftwaffe seatbelts set also from Eduard.
  8. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Time for some cockpit work. On Eduard A5 I will naturally use the dedicated PE set. My hope is that the color difference between the RLM66 base color and the strange blueish grey that Eduard guys had used for the pre-painted PE will not be too obvious in the end (for now, it is quite noticeable, damn). The only added some vertical bars which were part of the rudder pedals system. On Hasegawa A4 I scratched various details using plastic bits, the throttle lever being the most important of them. I used the Eduard plastic for the rudder pedals, because the Hasegawa ones are much chunkier. Both pilot seats were pretty much sanded (on the exterior) in order to reduce their thickness. I sprayed all parts with Gunze RLM 66, then some Tamiya Clear gloss as a preparation for further detail painting. There are significant shape/dimension differences between the two cockpits. The Hasegawa one seems to be longer and also deeper that the Eduard one. In my opinion, the Eduard cockpit is better both in dimensions and shape. That’s all for now. I hope to come back soon with more progress. A Happy New Year for all of you Guys!
  9. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    I started some preparation work for the Eduard A5 fuselage parts. They are molded with the engine back-end venting grills in closed position. I thought that it would be nice to have them in open position, so I just cut them off. However at this stage I noticed the grotesque thickness on the plastic in that area…leaving things like they are would mean that this armor-belt like thickness would be highly visible on the completed model...and this is not an option. So I started to thin down the walls on the inside of the fuselage in that area, thus reducing the thickness of the plastic to an acceptable level. I think it's better like this. Thanks for looking guys and have a nice w/e.
  10. One-Two

    1/48 Focke Wulf Fw-190 Anton

    Ok so I started with the Eduard A5 wing. Given the complexity of this kit I read some build reviews first and I can confirm that indeed it is very important at this stage to install first part K20 on the lower part of the wing, before anything else. This part ensures that the wing spar will be properly positioned in vertical position, because any misalignment here will negatively affect the wing-to-fuselage fit and also the entire in the engine compartment, between the engine itself and the cockpit/firewall. After installing the K20 the wing spar was next and then all the small bits and pieces composing the wheel wells. Everything fits very well in this initial stage and the kit feels like very precisely engineered…but permanent dry fitting is critical anyway. Regards,
  11. Hi Guys. After a long period of inactivity, due to lack of spare time, I couldn’t resist any more to the plastic call and here I am with a new project. Although I have several other ongoing projects in various stages of completion, I decided to start a new one anyway. This time I will also try a new approach – building 2 kits at the same time. So it looks like is Focke-Wulf 190 time for me. I will start with a Fw190A4 from Hasegawa and a Fw190A5 from Eduard. The Hase A4 looks like the simplicity in itself. Small number of parts, conventional approach, I plan the make it with canopy closed, in the guise of the airplane flown by Hannes Trautloft/StabJG54, winter 1942-1943, Russian front. One of the most highly regarded Luftwaffe unit leaders, praised for his outstanding leadership abilities and the care for his men. The Eduard A5 is the complete opposite of the Hasegawa. It is the old tool Eduard 190 Anton, the over-engineered one. Indeed much more detailed than the Hasegawa, but with high number of parts, a much complicated design, a model which should be posed with engine cowlings and armament panels opened for display. My intention is to have everything shut, except the canopy. Most probably, I will go for the markings of Walter Kohne from 3/JG1 during summer 1943. I like it because of the nose which is completely yellow. It also looks like this is one of the first 190’s armed with the heavy Nebelwerfer rockets under the wings, which in theory should have been fired in the middle of the closely packed bomber formations. In reality, they were difficult to aim precisely and they were transforming the 190’s in some kind of flying trucks. I read that Walter Kohne, who survived the war, hated the times when he had to fly such an armament configuration, but apparently managed to shot down at least 2 heavy bombers in this way. Ok that’s all for now. Hope to be back soon with some progress. Merry Christmas everyone and I hope that Santa will bring you all the kits you wish for.
  12. One-Two

    IAR 80

    In the meantime I'm trying to match the colors on the rudder with the ones from Radu's decal sheet. I'll be using the roundels since the markings will be pre-war. With the red I think I'm ok. With the yellow, I intend to spray same clear orange over the flat yellow and thus I will match the color. With the blue I tried first some Insignia blue...but it was far too dark...then I sprayed over some highly diluted French Blue (MM, gloss). Now it's far better than before, but I'm not happy yet. Maybe I could just let it as it is, although it seems to me that the blue from the decals is lighter then the one from the rudder. The problem is that I don't have any other light blue color...hmmm... Cheers,
  13. One-Two

    IAR 80

    It's too late now for this one, but thanks JBZ for the tip...Hataka is better represented in my local hobby shops so I will most probably use your suggestion in the future. In the meantime, I continued with the upper camouflage colors. This type of camouflage it is a first for me so it took a while to find the right way of masking. In the end, I used a combination of blu-tack and masking tape. I started with the RAF Dark Earth (Mr.Hobby), using the same technique like on the underside. First, a marble coat: Not the best one but this is a first for me also:) Then some very diluted blending coats of the same RAF Dark Earth: And this is how it looks now. Now I'm preparing for RAF Dark Green, hope to be back soon. Cheers,
  14. One-Two

    IAR 80

    Hi Troy, Yes you are right about the Hurricane underside color. When I gave this example, I was thinking of the British influence on the camouflage scheme used for IAR 80's and I completely forgot about the particularity of the Romanian Hurricanes. The exact color used on IAR 80's is not known with certainty and the discussions about this issue are never-ending. However, the British influence on the general colors used on the first IAR 80's seems to be a theory pretty widely accepted. The issue of the underside color is also very tricky. From B/W colors, this pale blue is very difficult to determine with any degree of certainty. Applying the same British similarity logic, it looks like common sense that the underside color must have been something like a RAF light blue. This hypothesis is also supported by memories of some veteran pilots, who described the underside color as having some sort of "duck-egg blue". Or at least being a light blue with duck-egg shade. The panting instructions of the decal sheet I'm using (Radu Branzan) is recommending Lifecolor UA515 "RAF Sky Blue" as underside color for this particular airframe. I think that it is a very plausible and probable interpretation. Unfortunately, I was unable to find this Lifecolor UA515 in my local hobby shops and since the other colors I'll be using (for topside) are from Gunze Mr.Hobby, I decided to use for the underside also a Mr. Hobby paint - and the one closest to RaduB recommendation that I could find was Mr.Hobby H314. It looks that is has more of that duck-egg shade in it, when comparing with the LifecolorUA515 - but hey, nothing is definitive or sure about this issue. Thanks for looking and cheers,
  15. One-Two

    IAR 80

    I started the painting stage with the underside color. Although the exact colors used on IAR 80’s are some sort of a mystery, it is most probably that the first IAR-80 wore a 3-color camouflage scheme of British inspiration. This British influence/origin for the paints used is clearly visible on pictures but is also supported by the fact that pre-war Romania had acquired from UK some Hurricanes and Bleinheims, which came with the standard RAF three tone camouflage of sky blue/dark green/dark earth. Another peculiarity of the first IAR 80’s was the fact that the upper-side colors of the camouflage were applied also on the underside of the rear fuselage (the so-called wrap-around camouflage scheme) – consequently the underside color was applied only on the wings, tail planes and engine cowling. This is my first attempt in using the black basing technique. Marble coat: And this is how it looks after the blending coats: That's it for now. Thanks for dropping by and cheers,
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