Jump to content

As a result of the close-down of the UK by the British Government last night, we have made all the Buy/Sell areas read-only until we open back up again, so please have a look at the announcement linked here.

This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

sven_ss

Members
  • Content Count

    144
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

235 Excellent

About sven_ss

  • Rank
    New Member
  • Birthday 09/05/1979

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bucharest

Recent Profile Visitors

605 profile views
  1. Hello everyone Do you have some news about that: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/102588-special-hobby-sh72151-iar-80 Thanks
  2. Finally it's finished: Bf-109 G2 Pilot Hauptmann Wolf-Dietrich Huy, 7./JG 77, Tanyet Harun/Egypt, Ottobre 1942
  3. Decals on from HAD decal
  4. Slow ongoing on this one:
  5. Syrian Air Force MiG-21F13 Revell 1/72
  6. You're right, my mistake. RS Models and NOT AZ Model. Thank you
  7. I have the same box, so I will pay attention to your build! good job so far!
  8. The Yakovlev design bureau began work on an advanced trainer based on the successful Yak-3 fighter in mid-1944, although the trainer was of low priority owing to the ongoing Second World War. The first prototype of the new trainer, designated Yak-UTI or Yak-3UTI flew in late 1945. It was based on the radial-powered Yak-3U, but with the new Shvetsov ASh-21 seven-cylinder radial replacing the ASh-82 of the Yak-3U. It used the same all-metal wings as the Yak-3U, with a fuselage of mixed metal and wood construction. The pilot and observer sat in tandem under a long canopy with separate sliding hoods. A single synchronised UBS 12.7 mm machine gun and wing racks for two 100 kg (220 lb) bombs comprised the aircraft's armament. An improved prototype flew in 1946, with revised cockpits and a modified engine installation with the engine mounted on shock absorbing mounts. This aircraft successfully passed state testing in October 1946, with production beginning at factories in Saratov and Leningrad in 1947. Production Yak-11s were heavier than the prototypes, with later batches fitted with non-retractable tailwheels and revised propellers. A 7.62 mm ShKAS machine gun was sometimes fitted instead of the UBS, while some were fitted with rear-view periscopes above the windscreen. In total, Soviet production amounted to 3,859 aircraft between 1947 and 1955. with a further 707 licence-built by Let in Czechoslovakia as the C-11. fonte: http://www.cartula.ro
×
×
  • Create New...