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hendie

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Everything posted by hendie

  1. Since I seem to have hit some leaves on the rails over in my Pullman Car build and have been stymied by my nemesis, the unassuming but terrifying nightmare otherwise known as... the paint job, I thought I should try and refresh my batteries by trying a diversion - namely, starting self flagellation another build. I've had this one in the stash for a while, and my interest was sparked by @HL-10's very nice Fly 1:32 Wessex build (sorry, don't know how to add that nice little box thingie with the preview) so I thought what the heck, let's give it a go. What's the worst that can happen ? Well, let's get some things straight before we start... this will not be a quick build. I just can't do quick builds. Also, as my slightly battered psyche joyrides on the sinusoidal monorail that is mojo, I will probably switch back and forth between this build and the Pullman Car to keep things (namely me) interested. Scratchbuilding? Well it goes without saying - yes, there will be lots of scratch building. There may even be some 3D printed parts or some resin parts cast up. Let's wait and see shall we? So what are we dealing with here ? Well, here's a couple of bits of 1/32 Wessex taped up and sitting in front of my 1/32 Pullman Car (yes, it's just the chassis so far, and yes, it's upside down). I never realized just how close they were in size to each other before. I'm going to need a bigger display case. and we're off! I actually glued two parts together 'scuse the 1:1 feet photobombing the picture. As this thread continues, I'll try and (constructively) review the kit. So far there are some nice aspects, and some not so nice aspects that I have come across. The most immediately apparent is the lack of any alignment features which is proving troublesome, particularly as the parts also have different wall thickness - you can't just go and glue a tab on the back of one part as the surfaces then end up at different heights. Then, part edges aren't square - tale a look at the gap on the reverse face here. (That will be dealt with later after the glue has cured) So, a short post to start the proceedings, but more to follow as mojo is rising
  2. Oops! I didn't answer Colin's question fully. If I was converting the MRGB to 1/48 it's very likely that I would have to lose or modify the 4 sets of vertical ribs on the gearbox. I could remove the ribs entirely leaving just the mounting boss at the base as a guide for attaching new ones, or I could make the 2 separate ribs into one solid rib, though I'm not sure how that would affect the overall look of the gearbox. The jacks may also have to change substantially in order to be printed - I won't know until I've made the modifications and uploaded it to Shapeways I'd also need someone to provide some base dimensions for me to work off since I no longer have a 1/48 kit available to work from (no, I'm not stripping down the Hotel kit !!!) While this looks okay in the Fly model, by the time I scale it up to 1:1 then back to 1/48, it may be completely wrong for italeri's version of 1/48
  3. I'd go for anything but the HAS - which to me always looked as if someone was having a poor joke at the Wessex' expense. (now, that'll rifle a few feathers!) Back from my travels again, Detroit chalked off the list, Illinois all but forgotten. I'm not sure Colin. (see later in this post...) At 1/48 I may be able to produce a 'starting block' for folks who are willing to undertake a bit of scratching, but a lot of detail will either i) Have to be left off entirely, or ii) Modified in such a way as to meet Shapeways acceptance criteria - which may in turn end up looking way over scale, and almost as bad as an italeri attempt. So, back home to find (not unexpectedly) oodles of work waiting for me, and all needing done yesterday of course. Hey, at least I won't get bored at the day job. A little relaxation was called for in the shape of Wessexery. And... how did that turn out? well sort of'ish While I was being shaken to bits by Detroits dilapidated road system, a few packages had arrived in my absence. To wit - a bunch of resin rivets by Masterclub. In some areas the Fly kit is very soft in detail due to poor molding and needs something to lift it out of the doldrums. I had seen these put to good use in Akira Watanabe's excellent Fly Wessex build I also use Akira's website quite a lot for reference photo's - he really has a great collection - all taken with an eye for the modeler. Well worth checking out. This should be fun... these are the 0.5 mm head rivets, each rivet having to have the corresponding hole individually drilled. In this case with a 0.4 mm drill. and guess who discovered that they broke their last 0.4 mm drill a while back and didn't replace it yet? So, onto other things then. This time some more handles adding a bit of detail to the cabin door Then after ratching about in the basement for a while I discovered that there really wasn't a whole lot I could do so I fired up the compressor and primed the small one. Surprisingly there wasn't as much clean up required as I thought there would be. I'm not really happy with the front end of this and it reminds me of this little mite from years past However, from other aspects it appears more Wessex like. The seam around the nose door needs some brickwork to close up some nasty gaps. I seem to remember stating Out of the Box - Warts and All - this may be a carbuncle that stays, who knows? A few other bits were primed, and then I discovered that I also ran out of my favorite grimy flat black paint as well.... something was telling me to give up this weekend! So in the absence of being able to do any quantifiable work in a forward direction I took a look at some other bits which had arrived during my little sojourn. Let's begin by taking a look at Fly's offering... In my opinion, rather spindly and weak looking, lacking in detail and missing some obvious features of the 1:1 (just my opinion though). My fear would be that the trailing leg will not stand the test of time - it's pretty thin and Fly haven't molded it well and I think the plastic will be subject to noticeable creep before too long Here's the printed alternative. I've made the axle as thick as I could while still looking reasonably in scale. The printed plastic is strong, but not tough. Provided it doesn't get a sharp knock it should alright though. I'm happy enough with the axle so I'll put that into the SW offerings when I get a chance. Which brings us to the last of the printed parts, and probably the bit most folks have been waiting for (at least I was...) The main rotor gearbox. I separated the upper wash plate - my pronged attachment method for shipping worked quite well, then cleaned out the through holes with a Ø2.0 mm drill to accept some brass tube later then gave it a quick squirt of primer and voila! some detail magically appears though in my haste to see what it all looked like, I omitted to remove all the wax carrier left on the part by the shoddy wax removers back at Shapeways It's not as bad as it looks, well, it is really, however all that wax residue is easily removed by some scraping with the back edge of a blade. The plastic is so hard it doesn't get damaged by the blade and the wax residue just falls off. Comparison time again - I'll leave it to you to decide which is more realistic. (note - not all the extras have been fitted to the kit version, but I don't think you need those to see the difference) and from another angle A quick dry fit.... looks about right from a casual glance. That should fool most onlookers and from the other side, lets take a look at the kit parts first Sorry, that's just not going to do it for me. Versus, the easy 3D printed option.... Doesn't that look just a little itsy bit better? It does to me. I will be redoing the solid model though. What you can't see from these photo's is that the fit of the gearbox assembly through the mesh is very tight. Possible but tight. I'm going to redo the top end and remove about half a millimeter from the diameter at the swash plate, bring the jacks in closer to the swash plate by the proverbial gnat's curly and also make the jacks just a tad narrower. That should give a nice close fit. I am however keeping the height of the gearbox the same height as the height to width ratio looks pretty close based on the photo reference materials. Note that the height of the cabin ceiling in the Fly kit is not the same as the floor lever of the transmission deck - that is level with the bottom edge of the beetle-back which is the horizontal edge you can see on the left of the picture. I will add some spacers on the bottom of the printed MRGB to help those who will just be plopping it into position without any substantial airframe modifications. So where were we then.... ran out of drills. Ran out of Paint. Need to redo gearbox. I'd call that a modelers win!
  4. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    I am aghast, agog, and ahhhh... astounded. Never happens to me.
  5. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    you might want to experiment with the alclad's before committing to the final job. Great paint in as much as replicating metallic finishes- but bloomin' awful (in my experience) to handle afterwards. If I as much as touch the alclad it just wipes off. I've never had real success with them. Even if I mange not to touch anything before getting some clear (alclad) gloss on it, somehow it still seems to wipe off. I use acrylics for the most part, with just an occasional alclad squirt here and there so not really qualified to comment on that count.
  6. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    I started reading Raphael's post and thought the forum had undergone yet another 'upgrade' while I was gone and posts were getting randomized - took me a while to figure it out! Raphael - that landing pad is a stroke of genius! I spray in temperatures up to about 80°F with relatively high humidity (to stingey to turn the air conditioners on until it gets to at least 85°) without any problems. Or to bemore precise - without any problems caused by the high temp/high humidity conditions. All my paint issues are down to my own incompetence with the medium. It looks like your steampunk kit was a good investment as it appears you keep finding little treasures in there
  7. hendie

    Avro 504K, 1/32, Scratchbuild

    Well, your last post really sucked (sorry - just had to go there - and you knew I would). Seems like you are moving along at a good pace since I was last here I got one of those machines a while back. Good value for the money. I haven't had the need to use it for some time but it's good to know it's there and invaluable when needed. I think I used it quite a lot on my Lysander build.
  8. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    Pretty in primer even! It's nice to see it all coming together though there is just the slightest tinge of regret knowing the inevitable is to follow
  9. It seems like it's been forever since I posted anything of note, but checking back above it appears that 'extended period' was only a week. Funny how the mind plays tricks on you. Not much has been done in the interim really. Mojo has been a bit wanting these last few weeks and traveling a lot hasn't helped, but I thought I'd throw up some piccies before I head off to sunny Detroit for a week. On the plus side, I'm looking forward to getting back to a lovely little Lebanese restaurant we found there last time around. To save you scrolling back up to see what I'm havering on about, and getting yoyoitus in the process I'll just repost the picture here again... Last time around I was harping on about some gaps between the cabin windows and the fuselage. Coulda been my fault entirely but since this is an italeri kit, I'm blaming them. My remedy was to glue in these bits of plastic sheet to close up the gap. The surgery worked - here's litle'un with the ears trimmed back. Oh, by the way... the sliding windows got glued on eventually using the tamiya pullme tab method. I did mess up one window but thankfully since this was a kitbash, I had a spare lurking in the background. There is a bit of a step between the window bottom edge and the fuselage though I tried to take care of that with some filler smeared over. Though I'm not too sure how successful that effort was - primer will tell I'm sure. Got her masked up over a couple of evenings. While the mojo was wandering I didn't want to begin anything too taxing so ended up fixing the center overhead console - The rotor brake lever had broken off some time ago so I had to make a replacement. The ball on the end is just PVA glue. Some piping still to be added to that later. Followed by a job I had been putting off for a long time - fitting the seats up front. I had been having trouble trying to figure out a good fixing method for these since the kit location points are as useful as a chocolate ashtray. Eventually I settled in pinning as a method - that meant drilling the back of the seats and fitting some stainless steel wire. Once I dry fitted the seats in position I simply pushed a little bit harder and the two wires punctured the foil I am using as soundproofing, leaving two nice little tell tale vampire bites in the soundproofing. I then drilled through the punctures and the seats could then be fitted. and that brought all work on the big one to an end. The good news is that the parts I ordered from Shapeways should be here by the time I get back from Detroit - if they are anywhere near correct, I should be able to start work on the big one again soon. Okay, back to the little one again.... Anyone see any issues here? I tried revamping the (wait... what's with the recurring vampyre theme in this post?) the debris guard on the nose by removing the center section. (Stuck on here with dirty blue tac) It does look better than I thought it would but there's no way it could be called pretty is there? Another issue is that now there are only two vertical bars when there should be three. And that is ignoring the issue that there is a hole in the 'mesh' caused by a short shot. Grumble Grumble... That's gone into the 'I'll think about how to deal with that later sometime' corner. After all that, the mojo really went on vacation somewhere so I contented myself with piddling about adding little bits of sticky-outy things that italeri did not include on either kit. Here, handles are being made from stainless wire. Followed by lots of little bits of white plastic scattered in a seemingly random fashion (you can just about see the handle fitted just under the cabin window) Much less blunderbussing on the port side though I really need to throw some primer on all this to see what kind of a state it is in and how much clean up work is required. Maybe next weekend
  10. hendie

    Avro 504K, 1/32, Scratchbuild

    coming along swimmingly it is. Nice bit of profiling there. you did glue that block to the top side of the wing didn't you ? I'm intrigued by the slots cut into the underside - I don't remember seeing them mentioned anywhere previously... or was I just not paying attention? My best guess is that they are the slots for the frets and it's going to be some form of stringed musical Avro
  11. looking superbly nice Bill that detail on the wings was well worth the effort
  12. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    nah, dinnae worry. We all have days like that (going through a few mesel)
  13. hendie

    Avro 504K, 1/32, Scratchbuild

    nope, just glue as far as I can see. some people just won't accept a challenge will they s'funny how the cunning plans always seem to appear when you're ( the royal "you're") way into the build isn't it? It 's be nice for a change if the cunning plans revealed themselves at the start of a build, thus making progress slightly easier to achieve. don't we all! Nice work.
  14. Ced, that landing light looks the bees knees. I don't know about the olden days, but in more modern times (breathing) oxygen hoses are/were always blue
  15. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    anyone you know? or will a complete stranger suffice? agreed! you and me both!
  16. hendie

    Avro 504K, 1/32, Scratchbuild

    I do remember thinking that I must add commentary to your mime post but life sorta got in the way (as it does). At least the thought was there. My vote is for the fuselage. Can't wait to see you carve the pilot
  17. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    nice metalwork as always there sir. Dunno if I ever mentioned this before, and it may work on your nano scale, but if you take some brass wire or rod and bend it to the correct angle, you can then stick it in a vise and crush it. As it crushes, it flattens (obviously) and increases in width slightly. I've used that for actuators and various other greeblies before
  18. hendie

    HMAS/m AE2, Scratchbuild

    finally.... the icing on the cake that little assistant down the haberdashery store will be getting lonely now, poor girl
  19. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    well, it seems to me that you have honed your skills on these plank winged flying machines to a respectable level. There's nothing for it but for you now to rise to the next level on the modeling ladder, and build a... helicopter
  20. That's the route I'm going to take, and hopefully remember to clean the port window before I fit the starboard side!
  21. sheesh... only just found this and we're already halfway down page 3 (and I think I missed another Ced build somewhere along the way too). You be getting a bit prolific with your builds these days Ced. I need a secretary to help me keep up with all this. Looking very good so far, but please hurry up so you can get to the Lysander
  22. I did think about that option Keith and will be keeping it in my back pocket if all else fails
  23. hendie

    Catching Pictures in the Air

    there's only one thing to say....
  24. Back to plastic modeling today - but only for a short while as for some reason I had the hand shakes and couldn't hold anything steady - not good when you are trying to glue delicate small parts. So I gave up before I caused any damage and continued with the compooter modeling instead. But first let's catch up on where I got to since last posting. I finally got the windscreen glazing on to diminutive Wessex. Hooray! I thought it was about time to expend some effort on the big one - after looking at it for a while, I spotted that there are some openings which haven't been opened. There's no mention of this in the instructions. I'm not sure if etch has been supplied for this orifice so I may end up having to make my own. Once the vents and other doobries are opened up you can see inside (at least a little bit) so that prompted the manufacture of some pipework to give the impression of something going on in there. Duly stuck in place... I also spotted that this little vent has a lip over only the top half so, cut some tube, stick it in place... Then when cured, a sanding stick takes care of removing the excess. I also added the GPU socket cover from some 5 thou brass sheet Last thing on the big Wessex was to start preparing the back end for the fuselage going together. The etch is just slightly oversize, so lots of test fitting, a few swipes with the file, test fit etc etc. Then back to small Wessex again. The canopy was a reasonable fit in terms of width and height, but I did have a small gap directly in front of the sliding window on both sides. Nothing too major - and at least the gaps are even along the length - so the easy option is to use a small section of scrap styrene. The edges of the styrene were painted black so you can't see them on the inside, then the gap fillers were inserted into the gaps and TET run along the joint. Once that's cured a sharp blade should take care of removing any surplus white stuff. So while we're on this part of the build, it seems a very appropriate time to quote Bill's earlier question... Okay Bill... what's wrong with this shot? Oh yes.... old forgetful numpty moi has gone and glued the canopy on to the fuselage without gluing the sliding windows in place first ! Some expletives were scattered around the basement for a while before I resorted to actually think about the problem I have now presented myself with. So far I have half a solution. I can get one window in place... it's not easy but it is possible. With a bit of care and bad language, a window can be dropped inside the cockpit area. Then with some blue tac on the end of a stick, the window can be manipulated into place... and held like so... (prime example of the shaky handedness I mentioned earlier in this photo) Unfortunately you can't just attach the window to some blue tac and push it through the fuselage from one side to the other... there's a cockpit in the way. You have to just drop it in any way it wants to go, give the whole thing a shake and then try to manipulate the window into position using skill, cunning and all that sort of stuff. Once held in place by the cocktail stick, a very careful drop of TET in each corner of the window will hopefully hold it in place. There's a few marks on the inside but nothing that can't be polished out without too much trouble. As I said.... that's half the problem fixed - I still have another window to fit, and I cannot use the same method 'cos I just closed that window off! Well, that's more fun to look forward to on another day. Back to digital modeling.... some more time spent on the computer saw the upper swash plate being created. It's a deceptively simple shape which gave me a few problems to begin with, but I think I eventually got there. The frustum on top looks nasty - but that's basically a copy of what Fly have provided the modeler with. I had to keep some elements of the Fly parts so this will fit together with the rest of their kit. There's just enough clearance to allow the swash plate to rotate and as far as I can tell, it should all fit. The only way to be sure is for me to order one to test. There's one small issue though.... if I provide the model to Shapeways like this... this is how they'll print it. As the two swash plates are joined in this model, the upper swash plate won't be able to rotate once it's printed. So, for printing purposes, I've added three small stanchions. This means the entire part can be printed at once (avoiding individual set up charges), and when I receive it, I can simply remove the stanchions and a quick clean up will leave me with a gearbox, and a separate swash plate that will be free to rotate - as I will be mounting this all on Ø2 mm brass tube for strength. A quick upload to Shapeways and a test f selecting a few different materials tells me there's no issues with all thickness any more and everything looks good to print - provided the shapeways engineers don't get all high and mighty. You can see in this shot that I also added some support for the jacks near the top of the gearbox. I may yet add more - this is merely to keep the jacks safe while printing/cleanup and shipping. Once the gearbox is ready to fit, those supports can be trimmed away if desired. and now it's time for dinner.....
  25. Not necessarily Crisp - it can be as much or as little as the designer (or me in this case) wants. I had considered leaving the ribs off altogether, but felt that would just be creating additional problems further down the line. And as a modeler, I know I'd be pretty peeved forking out for something like that and then having to do more work to get it to look right. (yeah, yeah, I know... no comments please!) After mucking about I think I have arrived at a workable solution. After all, isn't everything in scale modeling about compromise of one form or another?
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