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  1. Hi all, hope everyone's keeping safe, looking after themselves, friends and loved ones. This is a model I finished for Airfix Model World a few months ago that featured in the March edition of the magazine. It is, of course, Airfix's all new Vulcan B.Mk2. Early in the project I was asked by Airfix to provide research for the kit, in particular detail photography, aircraft history and to select colour schemes. Working with Chris Joy, the designer was both fun and informative. I have a fairly substantial library here on the V-Force as well as access to different archives, courtesy of many friends, several of whom worked on and flew the aircraft. The most useful source, quite naturally, was the real thing, in this case XM594, the airframe scanned by Airfix using LIDAR technology. The aircraft resides at my local museum at Newark, so was easy to access, prior to any restrictions being put in place. The museum staff were extremely helpful, even providing me with a 'giraffe' maintenance ladder to gain access to the topside of the aircraft to photograph normally inaccessible areas such as the cockpit windscreen and canopy, spine and upper wing surfaces. This proved extremely useful to say the least and my sincere thanks go out to all the staff there. As for the kit, well overall it was a pleasure to build, however there were a few annoyances along the way. Most noticeable was the fact that the forward fuselage/nose is split in an awkward area where no natural panel line occurs and it took some careful filling and sanding to ensure that the seam was invisible and that the streamlines shape of the nose was maintained. Incidentally, three nose configurations are provided, one smooth, one with just the TFR thimble and one with TFR and IFR probe thus allowing any combination of styles can be built. The intakes took some fettling too as they're provided in three parts, again all seams had to be completely eliminated before being masked and painted. The ECM tailcone is provided in two flavours, the earlier smooth style for the Red Steer Mk 1 Rear Warning Radar and later bulged dome for the Red Steer Mk 2. The options continue with two styles of fin cap, one smooth, the other featuring the rectangular AR 18228 passive Radar Receiver fairing and both styles of jet pipe, 200 series long cans and 301 shorter. These are accurately shaped and tow out correctly however they are provided in three parts making alignment a bit tricky (although a jig is provided). Once assembled and painted they are quite convincing although a single-piece moulding would be preferable. Incidentally, only Olympus 301 engine facings are provided, the 200 series looked quite different. Having said that a pair of intake blanks are also provided which can be used as an alternative. As moulded, the lower wings come equipped with full Skybolt attachment points including the rear point, two fairings for the forward hard point and the domed coolant blister. Only 18 aircraft were fitted with the full suite so it's best you check references when deciding which model to build as there were a few different configurations over time. Easily the best reference for this is to be found in the superb book by Craig Bulman 'The Vulcan B.Mk2 from a Different Angle'. Other options include a choice of three differently configured ECM counterpoise plates, fitted between the jet pipes and two styles of X-Band emitter fairings, a single head and a twin head. I provided all information, dimensions and photos but a few things still seem to have been missed as there are a couple of odd omissions, for example the short separators (basically short tubes fitted with long level indictors) located at the top rear of the main gear legs, (although they may have been removed for restoration on XM594 at the time, as a rear door and attachment ties were also missing) and the central windscreen wiper is missing, again this has been removed on the Newark aircraft. For some reason the entrance-hatch retraction struts are also absent and these were replaced using steel pins cut to length. Also Chris didn't realize that the lower red strut fitted to the main gear's bracing struts are only fitted to airframes in long-term storage, (hence painted red) and not fitted to operational aircraft, as such they need to be removed from the parts. The weapons bay and undercarriage bays are well done, featuring plenty of detail although I'm sure the aftermarket chaps will have a field day in these areas. One small gripe, the 1000 pounders are moulded to the carriers, making painting a bit of a pain. Careful masking is the order of the day. Anyway, I don't want this to turn into any longer a review, congratulations if you got this far without glazing over, if you're interested, please read my article in AMW for more details. For those interested I'll probably write a post about building the kit, in detail, after it's officially released. Being a pre-production kit, no decals or box was supplied and so my friend Chris Clifford, the former editor of AMW and now of Flypast, helped in providing some decals as well as a copy of his latest Combat Machines No 6, book on the Vulcan, well worth getting. Another good mate, Jan Forsgren kindly donated a set of the excellent Fundekals and Freightdog sheets too and these proved invaluable with this build. The aircraft chosen here was XM597 as she appeared at the 1974 Greenham Common Air Tattoo. I chose here due to the unusual combination of squared off fin cap, white tail cone and circular dielectric panel on the upper fuselage and early 'D' style markings. The ground equipment comes courtesy of Aircraft In Miniature. Cheers all and happy modelling Melchie The well appointed weapons bay with three carriers supporting 21 1000lb bombs. A Blue Steel stand off bomb is also included along with the correct fairing. Bit of 60's nostalgia... Vignette consisting of Noy's Miniature V-Bomber base and AIM RAF Ground Equipment. As no decals were supplied with the kit, the cockpit detail was built up using parts from Eduard's Victor B.Mk2 set and appropriate parts I had in the spares bin. The seats were beefed up using Tamiya Two-Part Epoxy as the kit parts were a tad undernourished. Seatbelts, harnesses, ejection-seat firing handles etc also came courtesy of Eduard. The cone fitted to the front of the cockpit is to allow you to fit any nose weight, (in this case Liquid Gravity). AIM RAF ground Equipment
    156 points
  2. Hi fellow britmodellers, this is my recent Airfix Beaufort project that eventually turned up into a minor conversion to Mk.IA version. Whilst most of the alternative parts were already included in the kit, some extra bits had to be added on my own either as scratch built items or aftermarkets, Markings comes from Xtradecal sheet for DD959 of 217.sq and the kit was painted with Gunze Aqueous and AK Real Colors. Cheers Libor
    146 points
  3. Hi everyone! I used to do be an air modeler till teenage but now I haven't built anything for about 25 years. So, please, be understanding for imperfections. Recently, I decided to make my modelling dream come true: I built the Monogram B-52 in the SAC 50s livery. The model is built out of the box with just minor adds like the replacement of the rear gun machines with 4 "Mini World" Cal 50 machine gun barrels. The colors used are: Dull aluminium areas: "Tamiya flat aluminium - XF-16", lightly buffed (to reduce the glitter aspect) and then covered with "alclad Klear Kote Matte - ALC313". Shiny metallic areas: gloss black, nicely polished, covered with "Alclad Chrome - ALC107". Anti flash white: "Mr Surfacer 1500 White". I know, this one sounds odd but due to the covid, the Testors colors I ordered took ages to arrive and I just used what I had. I'm anyway quite happy with the final result. Even though it's an old kit, I had fun with it. I hope you enjoy it.
    141 points
  4. Hi everyone, here is my recent completion for the Interceptors group build. It’s a Danish CF-104D made from kinetic’s 1/48 release and is OOB except for some (rubbish) decals that all silvered badly. Starboard side is going through a process of fixing that issue but Port side is shown here, with lesser but still present silvering and all. here’s the build thread: and it’s based on this airframe... And here with her older sister-
    135 points
  5. Hello all, I saw one of these built at a model show a few years back and thought how sweet it looked - it went into my mental stash... If you want modelling nostalgia and therapy at the bench - get one! 1974 moulding but you’d never guess, really crisp, fine detail and nice fit too. Takes me right back to a wet and windy afternoon in 1978 sat at the kitchen table covered in glue and Humbrol I haven’t really added anything, just a little brass for the machine guns, basic seatbelts and that’s about it. Although I did have to ditch the 70’s decals and as I couldn’t find any aftermarket options for the Siskin, I used paint masks based on the original decal sheet. I’ve already bought the Matchbox Hawker Fury and have an Airfix Bulldog to add to this mini inter war collection. I’ve even got my eye on their Seafox. Any other Matchbox gems that spring to mind? I seem to recall a Boeing ‘Peashooter’? Anyway, without further ado - here she is - 29 Sqn, North Weald, 1928. Thanks for looking, Guy And alongside the old 50’s Airfix Hawker Demon, who said you need high tech kits and a ton of aftermarket to have fun modelling!
    129 points
  6. Hi all. I just completed the build of Kinetic's very nice Sea Harrier FA2 kit. I used a cockpit set from Aires, which is not so nice. To be able to wedge it into the fuselage, you need to remove a LOT of plastic and resin. In my opinion too much work for a bit of improvement. Just add a resin seat and maybe some pe parts and you're fine. I painted the model Mr Hobby H335, Medium Se Gray, over Alclad black primer. Weathering was done with Abteilung 502 oilpaints. Thank you for watching. René
    125 points
  7. Hi all, here my fresh built C-130H by Zvezda in 1:72. Used Cracal decals for a 120th AW Montana ANG Hercules. The rest is OOB.
    115 points
  8. Ahoy there, Lads. There's probably a thing or two more i could do on it, but i'm calling the Buccaneer Done and Dusted. Let me start off with the executive summary, in classic "Navy Bird" Gillman fashion... Kit: Airfix Buccaneer S. Mk. 2C. Kit No. A06021. Markings: Serial No. XN977, 801 Squadron, HMS VICTORIOUS, 1965. Scale: 1/72nd. It's British! What other scale would it be? Aftermarket Products Used: Eduard BRASSIN Wheel and Brake set. MASTER turned metal pitot boom, Airfix Buccaneer S. Mk. 2B Air Brake Cones, CMK resin ejection seats, Eduard photo etched face curtain pull rings and canopy breakers. Paints: Mr Color, (Lacquer) Humbrol (Enamel), Tamiya (Acrylic AND Lacquer), Testor's Model Master Metalizers (Lacquer). All thinned into oblivion with Mr Leveling Thinner. Decals: Airfix (National Insignia and stencils) Modeldecal (Squadron markings), Xtradecal (where i screwed up the Buzz Numbers). Construction Details: This is the first 72nd scale jet I've completed since i rescued my Fujimi F-14A from the Shelf of Doom in 2008, and the first 72nd scale FAA subject i've finished since my Fujimi F-4K from 1988 (Those of you who have followed me over the years know that i've been struggling with a Corsair and Tomcat addiction. I'm still in therapy). Overall, very pleased with how this kit came out. I was familiar with the other Buccaneers extant before this release but was turned off by the amount of work they require to bring them to contemporary standards. This kit really presents the Buccaneer in a positive light, and it gives the type the respect it deserves. The kit is very intensively engineered, with a lot of parts in the box (explains the large box). Construction of the model largely mirrors that of the real aircraft, which is built up around 4 significant bulkheads. The forward fuselage splices to the centre section at the aft cockpit bulkhead, the aft fuselage mating roughly abeam the exhausts. Two substantial spars provide rigidity of the wings for building it with wings spread; a folded wing option is also offered. The air brakes can be depicted open (seen here) or closed. Weapons bay can be depicted open or closed (seen here). This model was intended first and foremost as a practice round to test and evaluate the Mr Color H333 Extra Dark Sea Grey and evaluate various kinds of Flat White primers and Gloss White finish coats. It was also an opportunity to finally use an old Modeldecal sheet which pre dated the Falklands campaign. Extra Dark Sea Grey is an elusive colour; depending on lighting conditions it can have a very bluish cast, or really none at all. Gloss White was used on many aircraft types as a protective measure against nuclear flash (over the shoulder bombing, you know), and i was skeptical about a gloss white being able to cover the bluish-grey Airfix plastic. Building up a sufficiently opaque coverage with flat white primer was aggravating because try as i might, there were always rough patches in hard to reach areas that required sanding down . I used mostly Mr Color Mr Base White 1000 as an undercoat, over which i applied Mr Color Gloss White. There were several sanding iterations with 3000 and 4000 grit, and at the very end i applied multiple coats of Mr Color Super Clear to lock everything down and prevent chipping. The Semigloss Extra Dark Sea Grey dried more to a flat finish. It took several coats of clear to give the model the degree of shine i wanted, and that caused its own set of problems; it behaved like a fingerprint magnet. Switching to Mr Color Clear Semigloss turned out to be a good move, though i had my doubts at the time. I depicted the aircraft with the speed brakes open. They add visual interest to the model, and they were opened up as a space-saving measure. Airfix does a commendable job at depicting this complicated assembly, but it did present challenges during its construction, and it forced me to paint certain parts and assemble others out of my normal "build it first, then paint it" sequence. The way the flat portion nests into the concave airbrake cones results in some out-of-scale joints, which would have required obliterating the raised kit details in order to apply some sort of photo etched brass overlay. I didn't want to make this build any more complicated than it needed to be. However, it all goes together and attaches onto the rear fuselage with no fuss. Curiously, Airfix included the later style air brake cones with the very pronounced "boilerplate" reinforcements in this kit. The later S. Mk. 2B Boxing incorporates the earlier style, "smooth" cones. So, i bought an S. Mk. 2B kit mainly for the cones, but also for the excellent stencils on the decal sheet. The end result looks pretty good. The Horizontal tailplane presented something of a construction challenge. I wanted to depict an early Buccaneer S. Mk. 2C which involved carving and sanding away a lot of the mods that were added to the plane over its lifespan. One of these required that the cone at the back of the stab assembly be reduced in with, with an attendant narrowing of the top of the vertical fin which the tailplane sits on. The Buccaneer had a variable-incidence stabilizer. The way Airfix designed the kit requires the modeler to attach the stab before painting can begin, which means it gets in the way of the build process and it requires a lot of tricky masking during the painting phase to get a clean, crisp result. You can't add it on at the end, like on say, an F-104 Starfighter. Creating an integrated tailplane that could rest on top of the fin and fit over it like a glove with a realistic scale thickness is probably beyond the limits of the state of the art right now, so i suspect Airfix had little choice but to go this way. The "Bullet" on the front end nests into a 90-degree corner and it took some work getting that to fit into place and get cleaned up. Airfix did a commendable job at re creating the distinctive "Trailing Link" design of the undercarriage; the outer fork on each strut combines an integrated brake stack that has a key to hold the tyre in perfect alignment to that the flat spot hits the ground in the right place. The downside to this though, is the struts are split into left and right halves, forcing the modeler to install the wheel into the strut before the halves are assembled and cleaned up. The end result is a rather involved assembly that can only be painted at the very end. I was worried about losing tread detail during the cleanup process, so I glued the strut halves together, sawed off the brake stacks, cleaned up all of the seams (mostly), painted the struts after the fact and installed Eduard Brassin tyres and brakes at the very end after painting them. The main wheels are anchored in place by axles made from small diameter brass rod. While its not obvious here, the intakes are very well rendered in this kit, featuring trunking from the intake lip back to the compressors molded into the number one bulkhead. Inlets are attached to either side of the forward fuselage, and the inlet lip extended to the inside with a well defined butt edge that the intake trunk abuts to. The end result is a realistic intake throat all the way to the engines, which if cleaned up and painted properly will pass the judges "penlight test". I only covered my intakes because late in the build it became obvious the the lateral seams on the intake trunks would be self evident if you looked in at just the right angle. So, i cheated..... HA!! *Intake covers on the Buccaneer, BTW are rather complex affairs and while i was able to eventually figure out an approximation of the front ones...i kind of gave up on depicting the ones in the back. The cockpit wound up being a combination of kit parts, kit decals for the panels and side consoles and resin aftermarket ejection seats with some Eduard Photo etch details added to the seats to disguise the fact that they're not....exactly....correct for an *early* Buccaneer. The seats themselves painted up beautifully. They sat a bit low in the cockpit, so i put some risers on the bottoms the raise their height to a more practical level.....perhaps too much? While i used the MASTER pitot boom, i avoided the IFR probe tip. Centering a pilot hole on the probe mast, given the relatively soft plastic just seemed too much of a risk. The kit probe painted up just fine, although i did incorporate a brass pin at the base to make a stronger attachment. Polystyrene is good for a lot of things, but re fuelling probes and antenna masts are not it. The kit pitot and TAT probes were used as patterns for making replacements using plastic strip and rod, since the kit parts were virtually impossible to clean up adequately to be made presentable. The scratch-built replacements look just fine once painted and given a wash to create some shadowing. I started this model last November, pretty much intended as a simple, "Slam Build", but this is not a simple matter like a MiG-15 or an F9F Panther. This is a big, substantial model, with a lot going on with it. In case you haven't seen it, all the build details, plus a sampling of my night club comedy material can be found here.... The Buccaneer is a curvy , complex, and nuanced shape; Airfix has done a great job capturing the character of the Mighty Buccaneer. You can tell they brought their "A Game" to this one. I'd wager it's better than their 48th scale efforts. It's not what i would call a quick build; it's not hard, but it's not fast either. If a modeler is willing to put in the time, he/ she will be rewarded with an awesome replica of Blackburns' proudest moment in Naval aviation history. Now, apparently somebody has released a model of something called a "Phantom". In case anybody is looking for me, i'll be investigating this. As always, Keep your Knots Up and your Powder Dry. Fly Navy!!
    114 points
  9. On the 13th January 1945 Liberator GR VI 'J' EW310 took off from RAF Leuchars at 09.23hrs for a patrol off the coast of Norway. They returned at 20.55 hrs. Piloted by F/O M.J. Frost there was a crew of 9 including air-gunner Sgt D.V. Harmsworth (my dad). The Operations Record Book states: “ . . . . nothing sighted”. That's a lot of flying to see nothing but that was not uncommon at this stage of the war as Coastal Command was hunting U-boats off the coast of Norway and into the Baltic. Dad died getting on for 30 years ago and we never really talked much about his wartime experiences. When I wanted to know he was no longer there. So most of what I've found out has had to come from research. I started with his service record, which I got from the RAF, and having found that he was in 206 Squadron, then went to the Operations Record Books at the National Archives. I was fortunate in that 206 sqn recorded both the serial numbers and code letters of each aircraft so I can be sure he was on EW310 on that day. Dad was posted to 206 sqn at RAF Leuchars on 14th November 1944 having been trained as an air-gunner. He was 19 years old – to put that in perspective he had still been at school during the Battle of Britain. The day after he had arrived an action took place which resulted in him joining an experienced crew under the worst circumstances. The following is taken from the fine book 'Naught Escapes Us: the story of 206 squadron' by Peter B Gunn and from the online 'Sumburgh Airport Archives': On the 15th November 1944 Liberator 'D' EW288 was attacked by three Bf110s three miles off the coast of Norway. Cannon shells put one engine out of action, rendered the hydraulic systems useless, hit the wireless receiver and knocked out the intercom. It was difficult to take evasive action. After nearly an hour one of the gunners hit the port engine of one of the attackers who then all broke off the action. EW288 limped back to Sumburgh in the Shetlands with massive damage. Large parts of the tail were gone. The radio aerial had been shot away, and they had to use the one from the dinghy. All loose equipment had to be dumped, and on their last drop of fuel the virtually uncontrollable Liberator was brought in for a good belly landing. One gunner had been killed and another had to have a leg amputated. As Peter Gunn says: “The fact that the aircraft and all but one of the crew survived at all owed everything to the skill of the individuals involved and the ruggedness of the Liberator.” It's difficult to imagine how my dad would have felt joining that crew. He would usually have been occupying the mid upper or rear turrets and it was the rear that had suffered the most from those Bf110s. I remember him saying that he would spend hours peering into the distance, sometimes in the dark, and waiting. Here then is the Hasegawa 1:72 B-24J 'Coastal Command' boxing which I've attempted as EW310 PQ-J being made ready for that mission at Leuchars on 13th January 1945. My research showed that these Liberators had Leigh Lights fitted so I used a resin set from Pavla for that. The little chap on the ladder is a mechanic from CMK (I scratch built the rag in his hand!) and the ladder is from the Airfix bomber re-supply set. Paints are xtracrylix with chalk pastels for the exhaust staining, oils for a few panel lines and the decals are from xtradecal sets and the spares box. I was prompted to take some photos and to post this as a result of a post by @Ravnos about his grandfather who was at Leuchars at the same time as my dad. Thanks for that nudge. All the best Mark
    112 points
  10. Finally finished my A-4K . It's depicted as NZ6201 from No 75 Squadron RNZAF when it was passing through HMAS Albatross, NSW. Australia in 1993. At that time I was working on No 2. Sqn RNZAF and we (for reasons I can't remember) referred to 75 Sqn as the gumboot squadron. 75 Sqn's aircraft had stopped at Nowra for fuel on the way back to New Zealand. Whilst they were there some mates and I took the opportunity to alter the Squadron crest on a number of the aircraft. I tried to add a lot of the little details that were specific to the A-4K and I'm pretty happy with how that worked out. That said there are plenty of things I wish I'd done better. Anyway enough waffling here;s some images. There are more images and details at my blog
    112 points
  11. Hi everyone The B-17 Flying Fortress, “Fuddy Duddy,” was used as a VIP transport in the Pacific at the end of World War II. It once carried General Dwight D. Eisenhower who later became the 34th President of the United States. In civilian life, it worked as a fire bomber and was occasionally used for motion picture filming, flying on screen in movies such as the 1962 Steve McQueen movie, “The War Lover” and the 1970 blockbuster, “Tora Tora Tora.” Here then is my replication of the fuselage and all the internal detail of the WarBird "Fuddy Duddy" B17G which is at present stationed at The Lyon Air Museum in California. I built it to 1:20 scale and from nose to tail the model measures out at 3 feet 8 inches! ...right from the start I had no intention of building the wings for this model as I wanted to concentrate on the internal detail of all the crew areas. The fuselage was constructed out of balsa wood and plastic and all the internal and external detail was built from plastic card ,wire,card ,aluminium sheets,paper and anything lying around that was useful! I designed the top part of the fuselage as a cutaway so the detail can be seen. No CAD programmes were used to build any part of this model. This project has been a big part of my life as it took me 10 years to complete!....I hope you like the photos! Thank you for taking a look! Cheers Fozzy
    110 points
  12. Evening, all! After building on and off since first lockdown(!) I've finally managed to finish my Hasegawa Harrier, built as GR.9 ZG511/82 as she was during her last deployment to Kandahar. This build was a real labour of love. It's still the best big wing Harrier in this scale in my opinion, but she really fights you along the way. The end result is worth it though. I threw lots of aftermarket goodies at this one. I felt that the subject was worth the effort. Aires cockpit (butchered to more resemble a Brit Harrier) Eduard MB Mk.12 Ejection Seat AlleyCat 100% LERX Eduard TERMA & Sniper pods DJRP from @Shaun (many thanks, again!) Eduard PE Eduard weighted wheels & outriggers Belcher Bits LAU-5003/CRV-7 Pods L'Arsenal PWIV Model Alliance decals This was my first time using Hataka Red line acrylics, and they performed flawlessly. Weathered using Windsor & Newton oils, Flory wash, and sealed with W&N Acrylic varnishes. There was a bit of scratchbuilding and correcting to do to represent a British Harrier. For anyone interested, trials & tribulations can be found on my WIP here. Anyway, here's some pics. Hope you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed building it! C&C welcomed as always. Thanks for looking! Daryl.
    107 points
  13. Hi! The model represents the Vickers Vimy in October 1918. It is the fourth prototype of this aircraft and the first to have new Rolls-Royce Eagle engines. The tail section is still old, it only has two larger rudders. At the end of October of the same year, it was used in France. The model is made by Eastern Express, very old casting by Frog. There is almost nothing left of the set in the box, used parts are completely processed, all other parts are scratch-built. I show the construction from beginning to end so that at least a part of the work invested in the model can be seen. The model is 1/72 scale. I used Windsock Datafile Special - Vickers Vimy (J M Bruce) and internet resources. Greetings [/quote]
    107 points
  14. Hi everyone. Finished this a few months ago and only just got round to photographing it. It's the fairly new Zvezda release which I was very pleased about when it was announced. Living in the shadows of Marshall Aerospace in Cambridge for the last 50 odd years, I've grown up with the sound of the Allison T56 so have become quite fond of the Herc, particularly the older K's. The kit went together without any issues and is naturally far superior to it's older competitors (much older from Airfix). I added an Eduard photo etch set in the cockpit, a set of resin wheels and the decals came from 26 decals. MRP and Alclad paints were used followed by a light oil wash and finished with an Alclad gloss cote with a matt cote on the walkways. I also added the aerials found on the early models which are not provided in the kit. Thanks for looking gazza l
    106 points
  15. Hi all, Hope you're enjoying the bank holiday and incongruous good weather! Thanks to the days off and good conditions I was able to finish this beast of a conversion which had been sitting almost finished for about a month. This is the Revell 1/32 GR.1 kit (well, a mix of two or three Revell IDS/GR.1/ECR kits all donating various parts!) The F3 conversion was done using the Heritage conversion set plus a lot of scratchbuilding, extra details and plenty of filler and swearing! The build thread is here: The subject is ZE763/DG, one of two 11 Sqn F3s converted to EF3 status and capable of carrying ALARM anti-radiation missiles with chaff and decoy dispensers on the outer pylons. The fit was trialled for possible use as a SEAD platform for Op Telic, but although the aircraft was well-suited for the mission the mud-moving community threw a fit and the concept was shelved. The biggest headache with the build was finding decals - none of my kits had any, the Heritage set decals were good quality but limited, while the available aftermarket Tornado stencil decals didn't have the required pink stencils carried by the aircraft at the time. Basically everything but the white stencils came from donor kits and spares, with Xtradecal lettering and numbers from various sets. The Phimat pod was from the Revell/Italeri Mirage, the drop tanks and BOZ decoy launcher were modified from the Revell kit, the ALARMs were from Flightpath and the ASRAAMs were the excellent new releases by Eduard Brassin. The BOL rails were included in the Heritage set and looked very nice. The pilot figures were by PJ Productions, although they needed modifying to give them a bit of individual character! I intended to mount this in a dynamic pose and the job was made much easier by using a 5mm carbon fibre rod rather than the equivalent 14mm acrylic the weight of the kit would have needed. I would thoroughly recommend the carbon fibre mount, being stronger than plastic but easier to work than metal. Anyway - see the build thread for top tips on building an F3 conversion from the Heritage, or any similar set. It's not a straightforward cut'n'shut but a very satisfying result. Very difficult to photograph due to the size and the pose, but here's one in natural light. I reckon with a photoshopped background this would look pretty cool! Couple of extra shots from earlier in the build: How the conversion set was put together: An attempt at photoshop background, woeful effort but I'm no expert! I've built a lot of 1/32 jets in the 15 years since I took up modelling again, and I'm really proud of this one, It's the pinnacle of what I can produce at the moment and came out exactly as I'd hoped. All the best, Alan
    106 points
  16. The model represents a Fieseler Fi 156 C-3/Trop of the Wüstennotstaffel 1 (SAR squadron). The plane is in the basic scheme 70/71/65, with a narrow 'wawe mirror' in sand RLM 79 superimposed on it. The painting, as my habit, was made entirely by brush. This scheme was not applied in Africa, as in the case of many other airplanes, but made directly in the factory, before the transfer for operational use. The codes, printed by me, are, as often happened for this unit, the factory ones (Stammkennzeichen). Some photos illustrating various details Finally an image of the lower surfaces. Note that the lower wingtips are not painted in white. Hope you like it Criticism and suggestions as always welcome Thanks for viewing Giampiero Piva
    105 points
  17. Calling it done on this year long project. Kit is Tamiya's magnificent (dare I say the best scale aircraft model ever released) Mossie, with a boatload of scratch built details (I think I put over 200 extra items into the weapons bay alone), Barracuda cockpit decals and other bits, AIMS 100 gal slipper tanks and Avieology decals for No. 333 (Norwegian) Squadron. Thanks to everyone on this site who patiently answered my hundreds of questions and provided additional information. A special thanks to Crimea River for all of his help. Here's the real thing, it matches up very well with the one photo available of KK-Q.
    104 points
  18. Hi all , this is my poor interpretation of a downed 109. I used the figurine from D-day and some civilian from Masterbox. The 109 is from eduard. the scene is fictional, because the white 7 was missed in action incl. the pilot. But who cares . It stands for many downed planes. And the figurine from D-day cried out for a little scene! Hope you have fun with the pics. Have a nice Christmas and keep healthy! Cheers Andy. ️️️
    104 points
  19. Here are some pictures of the 1/32nd scale HPH SB2C-4 Helldiver, that I’ve finished earlier this year. This was a very complex and time consuming build, that took me about three years to complete, working mostly on weekends but with some other projetcs in between. Every step of it’s construction required some scratchbuilding, to add missing details, correcting the kit parts, adjusting parts so that they would fit and be aligned or a combination of them. The lack of comprehensive references for this version of the aircraft made the work much more difficult. Here are some of the key improvements that I’ve made while building it: - Wheel wells: corrected the shape of the ribs that make the internal structure (they should be T-shaped and thicker) and added all the missing hidraulic lines and other details in that area. The kit lacks one rib, compared to the real plane, but I did not bother fixing this. - Bomb bay: added the missing hidraulic lines, mainly internally on each side, and scractchbuilt the arms for the two 500 lb bombs configuration (the kit only has the single 1,000lb bomb configuration). The bombs are from the Eduard Brassin range. - Front cockpit: scratchbuilt the Main Switch Panel, on the right side of the pilot’s seat, and the Armament Switch Panel, below the instrument panel close to the left rudder pedal. These items are very visible in the cockpit, but are offered in photoetch on the kit and are oversimplified. I ‘ve used the drawings of those panels from the pilot’s manual of the Helldiver as a reference to make them. Also replaced the kit’s intrument coaming by the correct one, simulating canvas, and added the pulleys of the pilot’s seat, that are missing on the kit. - Turtle deck: scratchbuilt the side walls and replaced the transparency by one vacformed. - Main gear legs: replaced by the G-Factor metal gear for the kit. - Craddle for the twin machine guns, on the rear cockpit: completely scratchbuilt, as the one from the kit is oversimplified. The bodies of the 0.30 cal machine guns and ammo belts are from Gaspatch, and the gun metal barrels from the kit. - Propellers: scratchbuilt the missing cuffs. - Bombs and and HVAR Rockets: aftermarket items from Eduard Brassin and Mk.1 Design, as the rockets that come with the kit are a bit skinny and lack detail. The model was painted mostly using Mr. Color enamels, except for the Interior Green, which is from Xtracolor. All markings were painted using masks that I’ve made in Corel Draw and cut in low tack transfer tape using my Silhouette Portrait. Your comments are welcome. Ivan
    103 points
  20. Hello to all of you good people.I hope you are doing well.I have just finished this Hasegawa 72 scale F-111C in the colors and markings of the Royal Australian Air Force.I added the eduard PE set in the cockpit as well as the extirior.Painted with Gunze paints and varnished with Vallejo matt acrylic varnish. Regards,Dragan
    102 points
  21. The most expensive kit with the most extras I’ve ever tackled. Painted in mostly Alclad airframe aluminium but weathered with the kitchen sink. Master Details pilots navigator & radio operator, brass gun barrels, magic scale modelling light & sound kit, brassin resin wheels. If you decide to watch the video at the end be sure to turn the sound up! Thanks for looking. She’s a bit of a modelling cliche but I love the scheme so here’s my main reference pic: couple of views from before I sealed her up Here she is in action
    102 points
  22. Good afternoon. Attached is the outcome of a long journey, my take on the fantastic Hawker Typhoon, in 1:24. This is my first build of this scale, stepping up from 1:48...and wow what a step up in commitment it was! I promised myself it would be an enjoyable OOB experience with some extras from Eduard, but none the less I got side tracked here and there with some mods. My take away? its its back to the safety of 1:48 for me...... Thanks for looking and as always, comments and feedback more than welcome. CF
    101 points
  23. I attach here photos of my recently completed Privateer, built out of the box (+ some home made improvisations) from an original Matchbox kit that has sat in the box for 40 years. The problems with this kit are well known, and as expected this was a troublesome build (if you want to know details, visit my personal webpage; link in my signature panel). Still, I really wanted to build a Privateer, the idea of converting a B-24 kit was just too daunting, and I found it for a bargain in eBay (currently these kits are going for more than $200 AUD - more than 3 times my investment...). Surprisingly, the decals performed like champs, even I opened the box though they were all warped, yellowed and stuck to the flimsy paper that was supposed to "protect" them. In fact, it was nothing that 8 weeks of exposure to sunlight could not cure. I also stuck with the original engine cowlings, even though sampling the internet would make you think these are gross abominations that misrepresent the original (I honestly could not see what the fuss was all about; pretty OK for 1/72 scale). Whereas the propellers did look wrong, I did my best to make this less visible using the time-honoured technique of sanding. One irritating aspect of this build was that Tamiya cement (both the normal and the quick-setting) did not work well with the plastic: seams that I thought were long sealed tended to pop up again days later. This created multiple cycles of re-sanding, re-gluing, re-masking and re-painting, particularly along the joint between halves of the fuselage, and half-wings. I am not sure what the solution is, but if you are lucky enough to find one of these to build (they have been out of production for a while), it may be useful to try a different type of cement. Anyway, this seems to be the only kit of the PB4Y-2 around, so if you (like me) really like this plane, it is worth investing the time and effort. There were a few things I would do differently if given another chance, but I think it makes a fine addition to my collection.
    101 points
  24. Hi all. Last week I finished the big Tornado from Italeri. Several aftermarket parts were used, like Eduard Space instrument decals, Quickboost seats, Master pitot tube and Armory wheels. The red/orange hoses on the seats were scratch built. The kit went together quite well. I had no major fit problems. The only 'problem' is the slightly oversized surface details. Much care has to be taken not use a heavy wash. Alclad black primer was applied first and then the model was painted with heavily diluted Mr Hobby H335, Except for the nose cone, tip of the fin and the light areas on the wings that slide under the gloves, the whole model was painted with this single colour. No white, black or other paint was added. Weathering was done by brushing a thin oilpaint wash over the whole model. The kit decals were used for this build. Final coat is Alclad Aquagloss, airbrushed from a distance to create a semi gloss finish. Thanks for watching. René
    100 points
  25. This is a Heller 1/72 DC-6 converted to a DC-7C. I started the conversion in 2010 using a contrail resin conversion set. The less said about those expensive mishappen lumps of resin the better, the grotesquely mutilated base kit was further ravaged when I tore all the bits off to start again some 6 -7 years later I talked Neil Gaunt of Aircraft in Miniature in the UK to do some some engines for me and he ended up creating a full conversion set. This set whilst looking much much much nicer was still quite challenging for this hamfisted modeller to complete, made much more difficult because of all of the damage I had caused by removing the previous conversion pieces off and getting the kit bits ready to accept the the new conversion, the hours of filling and sanding were uncountable though to be fair I would not persist for very long putting the whole shebang away for weeks and months at a time. Since I got back from the UK and 2 weeks of hotel quarantine in October I gradually built up steam towards completing a few models. This is not quite done I am toying with doing a bit of weathering and exhaust staining then finishing with a satin clear top coat before I run a couple of HF antenna wires from stub aerials to the fin. I am pausing for a rest and just looking at it now. Way way from perfect but it is close to good enough from a metre.
    100 points
  26. Another one to my "Falklands collection", this time 1:72 Mirage IIIEA, I-014, 1st Squadron, 8th Air Group Argentine Air Force, Rio Gallegos, May 1982. New Modelsvit kit, built "out of the box" except metal Pitot tube (Master) and squadron emblems decals on the fin (Condor Decals). Painted with Gunze Mr.Color C series. The Modelsvit kit itself is just great - extremely well detailed as for 1:72 scale, crispy molded, well fitted (although a bit complicated - definitely not for beginners). I think it was the best short-run kit I've ever assembled. "Work in progress" topic was on Polish forum: https://www.pwm.org.pl/viewtopic.php?f=884&t=90757 And now some pictures: Thanks for watching!
    99 points
  27. Happy New Year to all my modeler friends! Now the nearly two-month-long project has come to an end. Although is was planned to finish last December, I couldn't due to some issues. I have always wanted the F-4 Phantom in my collection and now that I have finally got one! It's the J version of F-4 from US Navy and the markings are Vf-102 Diamondbacks which you do not see often like the Jolly Rogers or the 3-tone Air Force Versions. The kit is from Academy in 1/48 scale. The quality of the fit and details are acceptable but I wanted a super detailed Phantom in my collection So I decided to add lots of upgrade accessories. These are- Cockpit PE, RBF Tags and Resin wheels from Eduard. F-4J Resin Nozzle from Reskit. Ejection seats and Electronic bay from Aires. Air intake covers from Quickboost. Carrier deck section base from one of the Chinese brands called Phoenix. Plus the missile head covers and pitot tube covers are scratch built. The build is enjoyable with only minor fit issues. Decals are of very high quality and so pleasing to apply as they are printed by Cartograf.
    99 points
  28. WIP here: Thanks to all who contributed, commented and "liked" the WIP Rob
    98 points
  29. My version of the great new Airfix kit. Of the two available scenes, I chose L9866, which flew from St. Eval and was lost on February 1st, 1941, probably to fire from a 109E. Both schemes have compelling stories connected to them; I chose this one partly for aesthetic reasons - the slate, grey and black scheme gives real visual weight to the tough lines of the airframe, I think. It’s a lovingly designed and generously detailed kit; the interior is wonderful, and worth appreciating before a lot of it disappears inside the hull. The major parts go together very well and any fit issues I had were self-inflicted. There’s some problem-solving to do with the gun turrets and working out when to paint and install them; I ended up fully painting the rear turret and installed it - plus the cowling - then masked it all off before painting the rest of the plane. Somehow I managed not to knock off the guns. There are plenty of images of well-worn Beauforts, and I wanted to capture some of that in the paint. I hope that comes across without being too excessive. It was easy enough to remove the stand in Photoshop, so I couldn't resist. There are some great builds out there already, and I've learned from them all. Thanks for looking and commenting if you fancy!
    97 points
  30. Hi All, My first completion for 2021 is Auntie's lovely Lancaster B.II. This mark of the Lancaster was a little different to the iconic Merlin-powered Lanc as it used the Bristol Hercules radial engine. The B.II was conceived as a backstop in case of production restrictions on the Merlin. This never eventuated, and the type was relatively short-lived due to inferior performance at normal operating altitudes. However, 300 or so were produced, and many ended up with RCAF squadrons until they were replaced by Halifaxes. There are 2 well-documented aircraft in the schemes presented by Airfix. I decided to model the aircraft as EQ*Z "Z for Zombie" of 408 (Goose) Squadron RCAF, based at RAF Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire, July 1944. This would have been at the time when this squadron was engaged in bombing support for Operation Goodwood, the operation to liberate Caen following the invasion. Here's some images of 'Z-Zombie': And below is a link to some amazing footage of B.IIs in flight (thanks @Graham!!) The first aircraft you can see is from 408 Sqn: The kit was built mostly out the box, although I did drill through the top escape hatches and added transparencies, and filled in the fuselage windows as was correct for this aircraft. Here's a link to the WIP if anyone is interested: Anyway, on to the photos! I've really enjoyed learning more about this lesser-known variant of the iconic Lancaster, and have had amazing support on the journey. Special thanks to @dogsbody for his amazing reference material (and general cheerleading from the Canadian corner - thanks Chris!) Thanks also to @Alex Gordon, @Graham, @elger and @bigbadbadge who have all contributed to my knowledge along the way. It's been a great learning experience, and hopefully my modest tribute to the many brave Canadians who flew this aircraft. Thanks for looking, Roger
    97 points
  31. Howdy All, Thought you wouldn`t mind me showing some photo`s of my latest effort, hot off the kitchen table My second attempt at HobbyBoss`s 1/48 Avenger kit Completed to represent a New Zealand Air Force TBF-1C Built almost completely from the box contents, only additions being brake pipes, seat belts and radio antenna wire The previous HB kit I did with the wings folded and I expected a bit of hassle doing them open but in the end it was no trouble at all Decals came from Ventura Decals set V48101 and I was torn between this and the Donald Duck option....... ........but in the end opted for the indigenous artwork Paints were Xtracolour enamels and my first attempt at brushing a feathered edge with them just hoping it looks OK to your discerning eyes Hope you enjoy the pic`s, thanks for looking Cheers Russ
    96 points
  32. RS model 1:72 Dornier Do17P. The camouflage was my own mix of Mr.Color/Gunze lacquer paints. Nanond
    96 points
  33. Hi all I've had this kit in my stash since it was first released in the early 90's but never quite got around to building it, I even contemplated binning it and buying the Kittyhawk kit instead but I plucked up some enthusiasm and just got on with it! The plastic had yellowed and was very brittle, the decals were shot so I replaced them with a new set from Revell spares department. I added a Neomega cockpit, a metal pitot tube and a set of Eduard BL755 (not sure if it is an accurate load). The engine cover blanks were scratch built, the cannon blast deflectors were drilled out and brass tube added, the kit wheels were modified to include some tread and vent holes. MRP lacquers paints were used with a W&N oil wash sealed in with a Alclad light sheen cote. Thanks for looking gazza l
    96 points
  34. Waaay back in the 1980's a scrapped English Electric Lightning was bought as an attention getter for a scrap dealer/lorry park/advertising location (?) close to the A1 Great North Road near Grantham (The A1 was a kind of early British motorway which connects London with the North and still carries a lot of traffic). It had been chopped up, wings and tail cut off but the new owner splinted it back together with blooming great steel fishplates. This crude method wasn't strong enough to allow the main undercarriage to take the weight, as the legs were outboard of the weak joints. Accordingly, a framework was fabricated to hold it all up from under the belly. It was a good plan but not well executed and with each stormy night, the sharp edges of the cradle cut into the soft aluminium alloys of the Lightning's belly, rather as the eagles tore into Prometheus' liver (Look him up in Greek Myths if you have the time and curiosity). Slowly, the Lightning sank back onto its haunches and pointed its nose at the sky as if trying to rise once again into its natural element, a process greatly accelerated by the removal of the nose radar. Well, it sat there for years, fading and rotting away (much like your author - lol). The souvenir vultures arrived and pinched anything that they could remove, and the scribblers vomited their graffiti all over the airframe. By the nineties it looked like this... Eventually, it dropped from sight and fell to bits and I thought that was the end of it. But to my amazement, I discovered while researching this little essay last night, someone is actually restoring the nose/cockpit section of it right now. Here's a link to their website where you'll find much more of the story: https://www.key.aero/forum/historic-aviation/144402-the-ongoing-restoration-of-the-a1-lightning-xn728 And here's my version using the Airfix 1:48 kit. I intended to build a scrapyard diorama but then I always INTEND to build a diorama, and seldom do. Some things went well; I think I was close to nailing the faded, chalky look of the paintwork. Some things were rushed and unsatisfactory; the chipping, for example, and the improvised interior details seen through the purloined panels. But, I still like it, and I'll concentrate on the bits I am proud of and leave you to suggest things that I could have done to improve it. Note that it's not a faithful replica of the original but rather 'based on real events' as Hollywood would put it. Disembowled! Robbed blind! Pinioned to the ground! And pinioned as in wings clipped too! Weathering and oil staining was fun. The original might have risen but my version was determined to fall on its nose. I had to pack the jetpipes with lead to deliberately make it a tail sitter. That was a first! "So where's the graffiti then?" I hear you asking, "Was it too difficult for you?" Yes, it was way too difficult. This model made me sadder with every detail I added, and when it came to scribbling all over it as well, I just couldn't bring myself to do it. Fancy me getting emotional over a few tons of scrap metal; I must be getting soft. Well I how you like it and all comments, + and -, are welcome.
    95 points
  35. Hiya Folks, Yes I`ve built yet another Airfix Spit Mk.Vc,..... this time representing BR187M G-2 of 603 Sqn which took off from USS Wasp on 20th April 1942 as part of Op Calendar. Like many of the Calendar Spitfire`s this aircraft did not last long as it was crash landed by Sgt J.W. Connell of 601 Sqn on 4th May 1942 and written off on the 6th,...... but during this short time it was flown extensively and was used by Flt. Lt. William Douglas to damage a Bf109 on the 3rd May. After delivery to RAF Abbotsinch in Dark Earth and Dark Green with Sky Blue undersides,.... the camouflage was converted on the airfield by covering the Dark Green sections with Middle Stone, the wing tips were removed and the aircraft transported to Glasgow docks to be loaded aboard the USS Wasp. While sailing for the Med the Spitfire`s below decks were repainted again on the upper surfaces because a blue-grey colour for flying above the blue Mediterranean waters surrounding Malta was preferable to bright desert colours and according to veterans who were aboard the carrier the paint used was the standard US Navy Blue Grey. As the paint teams made their way along the deck (which the US captain stipulated should remain spotlessly clean!) they began to run out of paint and so thinners and also black were added to eke it out,..... so those painted last were quite different to those at the start of the line! Here is a Spitfire Mk.Vb after being tropicalised in the UK, wearing Dark Earth, Dark Green uppers and Sky Blue undersides,.... the same colours applied to Hurricane`s being tropicalised and sent abroad in 1941 and early 1942; Here are Spitfire`s being loaded aboard the USS Wasp in Glasgow, wearing their fresh desert colours after the Temperate Land Scheme was modified at Abbotsinch,..... a few veterans mention a tent being used as a makeshift spray booth into which the Spitfire was wheeled as soon as it landed,..... others that work was also carried out in a hangar; And being stowed away on the hangar deck; Ready for take off,.... now wearing their new Blue Grey colours applied below deck; Note the US Navy Wildcat in the background wearing its own more faded Blue Grey scheme and that the Spitfire serial appears on a rectangle of the underlying desert scheme; Here is a film still of BR187, G-2,.... the model subject,..... on Malta. Other photo` s can be found on page 29 of Steve Nichols excellent Osprey `Malta Aces[ book (Aces 83) and one shows that the outer cannons were later removed, leaving the inner cannons in place,..... although some Spit`s did fly in action with all four cannons fitted; A four cannon equipped Spitfire Mk.Vc inside a Maltese fighter pen; The Model; For this Airfix Spit Vc (my 5th) I elected to represent BR187 still fitted with its 4 gun armament, as provided in the kit,.....but I modified the kit sliding canopy section by sanding the lower edges to make it look more accurate, the spinner was reprofiled to a more sharper shape and a set of wheels left over from an old Tamiya Spit were fitted as the hubs were more accurate looking, with a bit of old etched brass frame cut down to replicate a rear view mirror, which is sadly lacking from the kit. It was painted using old bottles of Aeromaster US Navy Blue Grey (as applied to the USS Wasp`s carrier group including the Wildcat`s which sailed with the 52 Spitfire`s) and Sky Blue was represented using Finnish Light Grey...... the model was brush painted as usual. And here it is with another Airfix Spit Vc wearing 79 Sqn RAAF colours which was built alongside this one; Cheers Tony
    95 points
  36. After a long and bumpy road here’s my Tamiya F-4b 1/48 Phantom II ‘Silver King’ VF-92 It was built in the current phantom groupbuild. the build thread is here… Extras: ladder (plus model), aim-9 covers (aerobonus), rbf tags (eduard), decals (furball/tamiya mix), cockpit decals (quinta), belts (hgw) It was inspired by some pictures of several worn phantoms. I tried using AK laquer paints for the first time on this and they went down really well. Hope you like it.
    94 points
  37. Hello, This is my last project, the F-100D piloted by Capt Allen Lewis and based at Tuy Hoa, circa 1969-70, with the classic “Snake and Nape” configuration. I am a big fan of the type and era, so I was quite motivated by this build. This is the very enjoyable to build 1/48 kit from Trumpeter with many modifications I made myself especially in the cockpit, canopy frame, landing gear bays & legs, extended 335 gal. fuel tanks, modified pylons, new refuelling probe made from brass, refuelling light and much more. I also used some aftermarket goodies such as a correct nose (Renaissance), tyres (ResKit, the one of the kits are horrible), exhaust and seat from Aires, pitot from Master, Eduard’s Mk82 and BLU-27, and a nice but fragile ladder from LP Models. Decals are from Caracal. I hope that you like it as much as I enjoyed this project. Antoine
    94 points
  38. Good morning. I finished the construction of a B17F Revell whose assembly is here: This is my latest diorama, which is also a bit of a way to remember all the airmen who have been shot down. This B17 bomber was shot down on February 21, 1944. His pilot belly landed his plane because he was injured, his co-pilot and upper turret gunner KIA, two engines out , a destroyed oxygen system and a ragged rudder (among other battle damage!). The victorious hunter, Heinrich "Heinz" Bär, came the next day with other pilots to inspect the wreckage. A Propaganda Staffel team was also there to film the scene. Figs are Preiser's ones. I dressed the Germans with paper coats The pilots came in a Kubelwagen (Italeri): and the kriegberichter in a Kfz15 Horsch (ACE) The German pilots unpacked the rescue kit consisting of a dinghy: I made this raft with paper tubes, which I covered with Mister Surfacer and which I painted in Humbrol Matt24: I crushed the paper dinghy to make it look deflated To furnish the boat, I made the "Gibson Girl": This radio transmitter is so called because of its shapes, of course! Some battle damages: I like the funny details: The Luftwaffe technicians thought they could recover the wreckage, but a flight of P51 strafed it. The unfortunate Miss Ouachita found herself in aluminum ingots to supply the German factories. Here is a new B17 in my collection. Well, I think that I will run out of space soon!: Thanks for watching. Regards from France, Eric-Snafu35
    94 points
  39. 1/72 Sword EF-10B Skyknight, VMCJ-1, Da Nang, South Vietnam 1965 Just finished this challenging kit from Sword. The usual short run kind of kit, needs a lot more attention than your usual mainstream model and involves a lot more swearing than usual..... The intakes were a particularly massive PITA....! The canopy was in 3 pieces and every edge needed sanding down to fit..... It does look good once its all together and is an important piece of history in the air war over the skies of Vietnam. Finished using Tamiya acrylics and a Flory wash. Cheers all. Phil
    93 points
  40. Evening one and all, Thought I'd share a few pics of my recently completed new tool Airfix Bucc S.2B. The Bucc is an old favourite of mine, having lived in NE Scotland as a youngster for most of the 80's these were a common sight blasting around the countryside at low level, and a regular visitor at Aberdeen on practise diversions, our school conveniently right under the flightpath! I couldn't wait for the Airfix new tool to be released and have another couple of these to produce yet. Built out of the box except for the addition of a resin CBLS practise bomb dispenser. A stunning kit, lovely decals, 2 great marking options, plenty scope for aftermarket extra's but it really doesn't need much to produce a nice build. I built this from the outset with the intention of putting it on a base and showing it gear up doing what the Bucc does best - low level! I did some maths and have displayed the aircraft at a scale 25-30ft off the top of the base. To fly a jet at this height at 500kts over a featureless North Sea must have been a phenomenal experience and demand utmost concentration. And so, on with the pics..... Hope you like this one, all comments welcome, good and bad. Rgds, Eng
    93 points
  41. By some strange stroke of luck, Airfix’s brand new tool Bristol Beaufort kit landed on Australian shores first. I therefore decided to take this rare opportunity to start a Work in Progress thread to help showcase what those clever folk at Margate have just offered us. The WIP (found here) is a little long winded, however I’ve tried to discuss what’s in the box and some of the issues that I came across whilst building this new kit. Most (if not all) of these issues were my own doing and I cannot stress enough how important it is to find and align the engine locating tabs in order to assemble these units correctly. Although Airfix provide two lovely and historically significant 1941 era colours schemes, I decided to deviate slightly and back dated my build to an early 1940 Beaufort. During this period many Coastal Command aircraft wore an Aluminium undersurface with ‘Type A’ fuselage roundels and No. 22 Squadron was the first unit to equip with Bristol’s Beaufort at around December 1939. By then the war was only months old and I can imagine the crews relief when they gladly gave away their obsolete Vickers Vildebeests for what would have been an ultra modern aircraft design. This new tool Airfix build is as OOB as you can practically get. The only addition was an Eduard Seatbelt for the pilot and I lashed out and bought a set of Eduard masks to help with the clear glazing... honestly, I cannot recommend this enough, I only wish they were a fraction cheaper! Decals are either from the kit (which are excellent) or from my ever growing decal bank. Main paints used were Gunze Lacquer Grey Green, AK Real Colour Dark Earth, Tamiya RAF Dark Green and decanted Tamiya AS-12 Airframe Silver for the underside. Clear coat(s) were a mix of Tamiya Semi Gloss and Flat Clears thinned with their own Acrylic Thinner. The torpedo carrier has been ‘borrowed’ from a stashed Airfix Swordfish kit and is used essentially as a prop for No. 22 Squadron was mainly dropping mines at this early stage of the war (not operational with torpedoes until September 1940). So here’s a series of final glamour and WIP photos and I fully expect to see plenty of these being build in the up and coming Bristol Group Build (starts 12 June). This is a brilliant kit, the overall fit is superb, it has adequate detail throughout and once assembled really captures the graceful lines of Bristol’s Maritime strike bomber. Go out and get a couple, if we’re really lucky Airfix might just upscale this to a 1/48 Aussie Mk.VIII. Cheers and regards.. Dave
    93 points
  42. Finally, I got to the finish flag with my LeO! The slow progress has been predominantly something that I’ve allowed while my over enthusiastic brain has concentrated on other projects. Note to self: limit my number of concurrent builds! A GB build thread here: As you can see, and you will all know by now, she is a LeO 453S (“S” for sauvetage, safety/rescue in English), modelled as one of the machines of the SASM99 unit based in Maison Blanche, Algeria, in the 1950s. This air unit emerged from the air sea rescue sections created after WW2 when France, signatory to the O.A.C.I. (International Civil Aviation Organization) acquired the necessary means to meet its international commitments. Consequently, the Superior Council of French Aviation Safety requested the attachment of the SAR to the Civil and Commercial Aviation Secretariat (SGACC). The military maintained operational control. It had the necessary materials and crews to immediately undertake any research within the areas for which it is responsible, including those located in French Africa. At the end of WW2, the Armee de l’air (the air force) therefore set up an air-sea rescue service (SAMAR) subsequently reinforced by an air-land search and rescue organization (SATER). This service was initially based in Provence (Salon de Provence) then in Algeria in Blida under the name of SASM in February 1946. It was placed under the dependence of the Air Defense Zone 903 having three Vickers Wellington as its fleet. A HP Halifax, detached from Bordeaux, then took over the interim while waiting for the provision of aircraft of the LeO 453. Three aircraft were first used and in 1953 the unit grew to six aircraft, enabling it to operate and fulfill its mission. The SASM. was then transferred to Algiers-Maison Blanche and, in March 1954, to Boufarik where it merged with the GLA 45 liaison group which included two squadrons; one for transport and another for sea rescue made up of eight LeO 453s. A re-organisation gave birth to GLA 45 and a new SASM99. In February 1955, SASM saw the replacement of the LeO 453, by four-engine Bloch SE 161 Languedoc which belonged to Air France. Ten aircraft were specially fitted out at Toulouse-Montaudran. Still in Boufarik, this formation again changed its name, to the EARS99 (Air Search and Rescue Squadron). In February 1956, it moved again to Algiers. Many problems were encountered with the Blochs. The squadron was reinforced by a Noratlas N 2501, loaned by the GMMTA (Groupement des Means Militaires du Transport Air). On a weekly basis, an aircraft (generally N 2501) was dispatched. By 1960 the Lockheed L-749 Constellation gradually replaced the Languedoc. Ultimately the unit went through more changes and new types. The unit eventually dissolved in 1969. The subject of this build, using the Heller kit (the only kit!), is No.21, coded 99-JC. Ten LeO 453Ss (Nos. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 30, 35 and 38) were operated by SASM99, some coming from the disbanded SASM98 and GLA45. No. 38 was lost in an accident near Mallorca in 1954. Specifically, No.21 was converted from LeO 451 No.457. She hadn’t been without incident as she had an engine issue over France in 1952. Finally she was retired with the remainder of the fleet in 1956. The only photo I have found of her is this tail-on shot. Therefore I post below a shot of the scrap yard at Blida where they all sadly passed on. Note that some of the fleet had de-icing boots, others didn't. No.21 was in the latter group. The LeO 453S was a heavily modified version of the versatile LeO 45 design, having a passenger compartment and observer positions. The upper gun “turret” was deleted. A number of aerials and antennas were added too. The biggest change was the change to R1830-43 (or 67) engines, driving Hamilton props. What did I use?: 1. Kit – Heller LeO 45 1/72 (80389) 2. Decals – Kit rudder stripes, Berna Decals roundels, and the remainder drawn by Giorgio @Giorgio N and printed by Arctic Decals. 3. Aftermarket & other bits – Renaissance Models main undercarriage assemblies and wheels (RF72064), DF loop bullet from a Heller T-6, Engines (with cowlings and props) from an Airfix C-47 (thanks @1903flight), EZ Line for the aerials. Various bits of Plastruct rod. I used a drop tank from a Special Hobby Super Mystere as the basis for the dorsal turret mods. I made the engine intakes from Mk82 bombs. The exhausts were made from sprue, bent over a flame and drilled out. The tail cone was extended with card. 4. Paints – overall Humbrol Polished Aluminium (27002), 33 Matt Black, 60 Scarlet, and others here and there. She was finished with Humbrol Satincote. 5. Weathering – Flory Wash (Dirt), Tamiya Weathering Powders, Prismacolor Silver pencil I must also acknowledge the help I got from Scott @Jinxman, James @1903flight, Wez @Wez, Mike @Michou, Tony @TonyOD, Martin @Lightningboy2000 and others. Thanks everyone. So here she is: There are a few glitches. I'm just glad to get her to RFI! Martin
    93 points
  43. Hey all, Here's my rendition of the excellent Airfix 1/72nd Bristol Beaufighter TF.X Built OOB with added rivets to fill up the large panels. I initially planned it wheels down on an airfield. I changed plans midway to depict a moment over the Channel just after the torpedo was dropped. Unfortunately mods like a head turn on the pilot, and various pitches in the control surface and the tail wheel in landing config were too late to change as I had already built and painted the model by then. Also my resident elf 'Sloppy' decided he wanted the tail gunner's machine gun for himself. It was also an experiment with liquid resin. Modeled the ocean with Plaster of Paris, made a negative with latex rubber and then poured the resin. Messy! The splash was made with cotton and white glue (also hides the deployed tail wheel and acrylic rod holding the aircraft up) Unfortunately the torpedo and all the work with the bubbles is hardly visible in the end result. The props were made by masking and spraying the black and yellow in two separate passes on clear packaging plastic. They're pretty flimsy- I need a better solution for that. Painted with Tamiya acrylic, Alclad2 Burnt Iron on the engine cowling and weathered with oils and pastels. It's a surprisingly large aircraft with a wider wingspan than the F/A-18F or Sukhoi-30! WW2 was a crazy time in engineering ingenuity. Thank you for your interest! Cheers, Alex.
    93 points
  44. After about 3 weeks of work I have been able to complete Tamiya's superb Ki-61 Hien. I made an early decision to model the solid green 19th Sentai machine included with the kit but after the obligatory research prior to starting I actually fell in love with photo of a 19th Sentai machine that was found at Luzon after the war. So I loosely based the camouflage off of the below photo (credit to the Arawasi Blog for the picture) The Tamiya kit itself is a dream to build. Needing next to no filling at all, the kit basically fell together without a fuss. The only additions were some Eduard harnesses in the cockpit as well as a set of Eduard masks for the canopy. I also purchased a set of Quickboost Ki-61 Drop tanks & pylons as they don't come in the 1/72 kit. The only thing I modified were the landing gear doors by cutting them off above the oleo strut as I found a lot of examples of Philippine machines setup this way. It's been painted entirely with SMS paints (Aussie brand) as well as some small detail work with Vallejo acrylics. The camo was painted free hand with my H&S CR-Plus airbrush on a .2 needle. Weathering was a combo grey, black & brown Tamiya panel liner wash, pigments & weathering pencils. Hopefully I will create a little scenic base for her in the future again based on the above picture but got to teach myself that craft. As the cockpit can't really be seen once it's all been closed up, here are some pics I took before it went in. Luckily I remembered to take them! Now to decide on the next one to start on! Thanks everyone for letting me share
    92 points
  45. Here my latest. It's Revell's 1/32 Tempest V. This is a re-box of the Special Hobby kit and is really quite nice. The moulding is just sublime with wonderful panel details and thousands of subtle rivets, which look just fantastic on the finished model. The fit of the parts can be challenging at times but care and a little test, dry-fit and adjust gets it done. I added Kamizukuri paper seat belts (the wong style I now realise - they should not be Sutton type), Master Brass gun barrel (SUPERB!) and the Barracudacast Nose Correction Set. They jury is out on the Barracudacast nose, it is a slightly different shape than the kit but mine was mis-moulded requiring a lot of work to correct. Add to that the fiddling to get the radiator parts in, the radiator door , to get it to fit to the fuselage (hot water, hairdryer and some bending to make it wider/less tall) and trimming the exhausts was a lot of work to fix a subtle error on the kit parts. Oh well, it's on there now and looks the part. The correction set includes a new spinner and propellor blades and these were very nice. Paints are basically Tamiya acrylics over Tamiya laquer primer. Decals are from the kit. Minimal weathering is my preference. The final finish is Future floor polish with a little Tamiya Flat mixed in. WIP is here: Hope you like it!!! Comments/critiques/ corrections (and cash) always welcome!!!!
    92 points
  46. My first post of my work here. Constructive criticism is welcome! I hope you all like it Here is my rendition of the ‘bent-wing bird’. I used the Eduard cockpit (never again) & propeller, HGW belts & stencils, Barracuda Wheels, and a load of scratchbuilding! I did some super-detailing on the engine, cowl flaps, canopy fittings, and wheel bays. It is a fictional scheme from a Guadalcanal based unit, flown by the fictional Lt M. W. Hendrik. I hope you enjoy my build, I had great fun with the weathering on this one. I have come to love dirty aircraft and learned a good deal of new techniques for this plane (still not so great at them!). On to the pictures!
    91 points
  47. Hi all - after spending a year spent building the Dynavector Scimitar I needed a mojo restorer and this kit did the trick for me - it went together in a couple of months and makes an impressive model even just out of the box. I relied heavily on Antti_k's WIP of his Javelin and the BM walk arounds on the Javelin. The only area that gave me any concern was joining the nose of the model to the main body of the aircraft which was probably self inflicted - the ejection seats did not have any harness but I thought they looked quite good so decided to make my own harnesses - Ejection seat harnesses are a bit of a mystery to me, I tried unsuccessfully to print the harness like Antti_k showed in his WIP but ended up using strips of foil cut from a Ferrero Rocher chocolate wrapper and a set of 1/48 buckles etched by L'Arsenal of France. What you see is my artistic impression of the jumble of belts on an ejection seat especially on the seat part. canopy strips were from an Xtradecal stripes sheet - can see a bit of touch up needed below I added wheel chocks and fire extinguisher from a Flightpath RAF diorama set Thanks CJP
    91 points
  48. I'm calling this done, after a long-ish pleasant build - with some problems entirely of my own making. The WIP is here ........ .......... and grateful thanks to everybody who looked in / liked / commented and contributed, particularly @Anthony in NZ @Spookytooth and @(ex)Sgtrafman who regularly commented and chivvied me along - especially as this was my first WIP. Special thanks to @(ex)Sgtrafman and @DaveJL for providing replacements for the decals I was clumsy enough to destroy. This was a build of the Revell 1/48 Phantom FGR.2 using Xtradecals for a 74 Squadron line jet on QRA. The idea was to stretch my skill set with a bit of resin / etch and to gain a bit more experience with the airbrush. And have fun! Revell base kit. Love it - goes together easily - all flaws seen here are of my own making. Eduard Big Ed FGR2 set - Rather wish I hadn't bothered, as many of the contents are not applicable to RAF jets eg RBF flags and intake FOD covers - most useful component was the Eduard 49262 cockpit set. Eduard Brassin AIM9L's (none included in the base kit) Great set which includes noddy caps and decals. Flightpath ladder and pull-out cockpit steps. Excellent. Aires seats. Excellent. QuickBoost FOD covers and resin covers for nose data probes. Excellent. Home made (RAF!) RBF flags. Xtradecal transfers for 74 Sqn History (set X48080). Excellent. MRP paints - absolutely love them - I'm no longer scared witless of my airbrush - they are simply idiot / Quack proof! W&N oils for weathering - actually doesn't show well in these phone pics - better with the Mk 1 eyeball. What I learned I really enjoyed this project and I feel my builds are improving steadily - still uphill on the learning curve! 1. Must not take shortcuts / rush things. 2. Some seams are still not great eg the step still visible at the intake join above the leading edge wingroot. 3. Also learned to seal decals in quickly after drying as they are more delicate than I thought (thanks again for the replacements guys) 4. Research the aftermarket stuff better, rather than buying the first big bargain set I see..... false economy 5. I learned that I still love doing this stuff! Big Kid again! OK, on with the final pics - 199 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 200 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 201 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 202 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 203 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 204 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 205 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 206 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 208 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 212 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr 211 by Niall Robertson, on Flickr Building this reminded me of just how massive these beasts were - I have dear memories of (FG.1s) lifting off from Leuchars, making my chest resonate with the noise as they went - an amazing sense of power. The base seen in some of the pics is a Coastal Kits 1/48 base which my Hawk T1 barely fill - the Phantom in contrast overhangs all round! Heavy Metal indeed. Thanks to all for tuning in. Keep safe Keep Calm and Mangle some Plastic Q
    91 points
  49. Hello Britmodellers, here my Merry Christmas to you all! I love the picture i got via SG ETUO. Great Group which wants to make a Flugplatz Museum with mostly british AC. Ca. 1971: Quite fresh XV800 No. 20 Sq from Wildenrath Now on top new pictures of my changed (yesterday) R.A.F.P. corporal with "Snowdrop" cap and black/red R.A.F.P. armband on the left. A happier New Year to you all! Tom
    91 points
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