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  1. Hello all, I've been working on this one for a while now and i was hoping to get outside and get some photo's on a diorama and in daylight, but the weather hasnt been playing ball. So, i thought i'd get some indoor pics done and then update this later. The build includes Red Fox Studios instrument set and all the weapons are attached with magnets for ease of transportation, paints were from Gunze and oil washed with Abteilung Starship filth for the most part. All comments welcome
    8 points
  2. Good afternoon This is my build of the 1/72 Douglas Dakota from Airfix as used by the Royal Australian Navy. I completed this earlier in the year. In the 1950's this particular aircraft, N2-43, was fitted with a Sea Venom nose and radar and a Gannet radar under the rear fuselage and served as a flying classroom for Observers (Navigators) for those front line aircraft. When the Sea Venoms and Gannets were replaced with Skyhawks and Trackers in the late 1960's the radars were stripped out and N2-43 was returned to general duties but retained the modified nose. Built as a C47A, it's original USAAF serial was 42-92711 and it flew with the RAAF as A65-43 until being delivered to the RAN in 1949 as N2-43. It flew with 851 Squadron which became VC851 when the RAN flew mostly American aircraft. I used decals from Hawkeye Models and a resin nose from Southern Sky Models in WA to modify the kit. This Dakota is currently on display at the Australian Fleet Air Arm Museum at Nowra NSW. Paints used were: Tamiya X-2 Gloss White Tamiya XF-71 Cockpit Green Vallejo Metal Color Aluminium various Tamiya blacks Minimal weathering, as these aircraft were kept in very good condition. Flory grey wash to highlight panel lines and Abteilung oils for exhaust and hatch stains. The kit went together quite well except for gaps on the upper wing roots which required some attention. Also some of the smaller parts were a bit brittle and snapped. This seems to be common with some of Airfix's new plastic or it could just be my not so small fingers. Just behind the wings on the fuselage underside I have scribed a square panel which is a patch on the real aircraft covering the hole where the Gannet radar used to drop down. The underwing serial '800' was not included in the decals so I made a stencil and air brushed it on. This is the aircraft on display at the RAN FAA museum at Nowra, NSW. These photos were taken by me in March this year in between covid lockdowns.
    7 points
  3. Hi everyone! Let me present my new model. This time it’s Supermarine Spitfire, one of my favourites. There’s no need to specify the facts about the prototype because everyone knows this plane inside out and it’s one of the most frequently assembled models. However, I should point out that I wanted to show the qualities which were specific for early Spitfires. Those were the fighting machines whose creators had no idea about real combat conditions. They were equipped by a streamlined flat canopy that didn’t provide 360-deg vision or have any armoured windscreen panel (when you come to think of it, the plane had no armoured protection neither for life-critical units nor for a pilot). Moreover, the early models were built up with an old-school two-bladed rotor and some throwbacks such as an antispin parachute, and there wasn’t any weapon heating. It rendered the fighter useless on apparent combat heights of German bombers because frozen machine-guns didn’t work there. In other words, the early Spitfires were like Englishmen with enormous potential but poorly aware of what was waiting for them in the heat of the coming major war. I’ve chosen Airfix A02010 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I/Mk.IIa set for assembling. The set makes a good impression, the details are well-fitted, but still there are certain drawbacks in canopy-fuselage attaching and wing-fuselage blending. The model is quite accurate, so it hasn’t raised a lot of my criticism. The only thing is that the upper part of cowl panel has square-flat shape closer to the Mk.V rather than Mk.I. The panel lining is pretty true-to-fact although a bit simplified and needs improvement. The model features the 9th manufactured prototype of Spitfire K9795 from the 19th Royal Air Force squadron in Duxford as in October of 1938. Thanks for looking!
    7 points
  4. As the decal sheet for this kit includes decals for an Italian operated reaper, I could have done that and said it was the Italian Job - the remake, but I decided to stick with the British markings (When I get around to making the F-35B in the stash, I'll do that one in British markings, too) Interestingly, this is probably the most recent purchase in the stash that I've made! I hand painted the white discs, then cut the decals for the red only. This doesn't show particularly well that I used bare metal foil and then clear green (Tamiya) over it for the front sensor glass. You can just about make out the hellfire sensor, I used a drop of glue and glaze and then painted it clear orange (Tamiya). This is the aerocraft brass undercarriage. I painted the oleo in the front leg with a molotow chrome pen. The aerocraft undercarriage is certainly sturdy ! I also painted the propellor spinner with the molotow chrome pen, it doesn't look too bad compared to the picture in the walk around. I pinted the model with Halfords rattle can grey primer, then Tamiya Rattle can light compass grey. I think this might have been a touch dark. Overall, the kit itself was a pretty good build. It went together fine, I did have to use some filler on a couple of gaps but nothing too bad at all. I put 20 grams of fishing weight in the nose, it certainly isn't a tail sitter !! The aerocraft undercarriage is really sturdy, priming them with Mr Metal Primer they took the halfords primer and then the tamiya compass gray well, but the instructions called for the nosewheel to be black, and that (tamiya flat black) is prone to rubbing off. Let's hope the coat of Galleria flat varnish stops that. I decided to go for only two hellfires on the pylons, painting them yellow first and using masking tape for the 3 bands and then nato green. Looking at the walk around photos, it seems a pretty clean plane so I did no weathering, washing, or pre shading. The decals went on okay. They also came off okay, too; one decal disappeared, only to resurface in my little water bath! Nope, I have no idea how that happened. I wasn't sure about whether the propellor tips were yellow; the instructions didn't show it, and one or two walk around photos didn't appear to show yellow tips, but then going through the decals I found decal blade strips. I decided to leave them off because I thought they'd be too much of a faff to put on. Overall, the instuctions and painting call outs are a dogs dinner. I have parts on the sprue that weren't mentioned in the leaflet (maybe they are intended to be left off, maybe the leaflet writer didn't put them in); some of the instructions wrongly numbered parts, and the painting call outs leave a lot of areas unidentified; it was down to guesswork or the walk around photos! Oh, and some other builds I found in Britmodeller had some good photos which I used as the basis for my guesses. Overall, this was a nice kit to make, but oh dear, let down a bit by Kinetic's poor instructions.
    7 points
  5. Hi! I’m Sophie. Thought I’d join up and introduce myself. I am an archaeologist who specialises in WWII, I hail from London, and I am a bit of a history buff. I have been building models since I was about 8 but fell out of the hobby as I got older. Got back into the hobby about a decade ago, and though I primarily build 1/32 WWII aircraft, I do enjoy vehicles, and been trying my hand at ships recently too. I also used to do a few sci-fi models in to past too. Most of my models are fictional vehicles, with a sort of ‘historical plausibility’ about them, and I am currently planning a Luft ‘46 project. I don’t think my skills are the best, and I often don’t show my finished work off as I think some of the builders out there far outstrip me in skill, but I hope I can share a few with you guys as I get better. I’ll stick a couple of pics of my earlier work down below. Hope to chat to you all soon! Sophie
    4 points
  6. I built another plane from the Tintin comics. I started with a 1/72 scale 109B and 109F from Heller I wasn't happy with the result so it ended up half built for a long time. Partly because my Alps printer died so I couldn't make the decals for it. But when I bought a Cameo cutting machine I thought that this would make a suitable experiment of making masks for painting so I brought it out of sleep and finished the build.
    3 points
  7. Hi Fellow Britmodellers--- Here is a plane I just finished an hour ago... Took almost two weeks and its probably my best model thus far. This one is an Academy kit of the original Accurate Miniatures tooling. The Academy instructions were really hard to follow and missed steps! If you build one, head to scalemates and look up the old Accurate Miniatures instructions posted online. I had to several times to figure out how to build this!!! I added resin wheels, eduard PE seat belts, and the decals are techmod for the USS Essex TBM-3 Avenger. I detailed the bombs with printscale US weapons decals. One thing I had to fix was the kit did not have the tailwheel extended properly (or I goofed placement of a bulkhead, but not sure). I had to add a post to the top of the tail gear retract strut to get the tail gear rotated out enough as per photos of real Avengers. Looking at builds of this kit on line, everyone seems to have the partially extended tailwheel! So watch for that when you build yours... I painted in Gunsie Mr Color sea blue and intermediate blue and flat white. I also painted according to official TBM paint guide with the 'gradiated blue' on the Leading Edges of the Wing and Stab which is same as on fuselage sides. I found a photo of the real Georgia Peach flying and so weathered and detailed accordingly... This one came out nice! Thanks for watching and checking it out...
    3 points
  8. Hi all, Fresh from the Hellcat STGB is the superb Airfix 1/24 F6F-5 Hellcat, converted to an FAA NF.II using Aerocraft's conversion and decal set. This is the first 1/24 kit I've ever made and it's absolutely spectacular. A really impressive piece of engineering. This is built OOB apart from the conversion and beautiful wheels from Defmodel of Korea. The fit is damn near perfect, the assemblies are complex but everything slots into place very snugly (so snugly that even a thin coat of paint can throw off the placement). The surface detail has to be seen to be believed. It's so well-rendered I decided not to do any weathering as the surface textures provide all the visual interest on their own. The kit is also very accurate, and provides different options for the instrument panel and drop tank, as well as US and British rocket stub patterns. The engine and other internals are perfectly rendered and the massive 75-page, 310-step instruction manual gives excellent clear placement details. All the cockpit placards are provided as decals, though you could also consider the Airscale replacement for additional detail. This is all OOB. Anyway...if you fancy a 1/24 scale model, this is absolutely worth the £100-odd price tag and will build up into a really impressive (and HUGE) display model. I can't recommend it enough. The very nice radar and decals conversion from Aerocraft were just the icing on the cake, it looks very smart in its Glossy Sea Blue coat and FAA roundels Here's the Hellcat STGB build thread which may help if you have our want one of these to build: Thanks for looking, Alan
    3 points
  9. Hi all This is Eduard's 1/48 G-6, built OOB and finished in the markings of Major Ludwig Franzisket, Gruppenkommandeur of JG27, from around 1944. Really enjoyable build, with no issues. First time, I think, using Eduard's new decals. Although I didn't try peeling off the carrier film as many are doing, they work very well. Having said that, I still used paint masks for the upper wing and fuselage crosses. Franzisket flew throughout the war, achieving 39+ victories, before surrendering with what was left of JG27 in Austria in May 45. After the war, he studied at the University of Munster, achieving a PhD in biology and finishing up his new career as Professor of Biology and Director of the Westphalia Museum of Natural History. Hope you like the pics...
    3 points
  10. Evening all, the latest completion done and dusted- Zvezda's superlative Su27ub. I've always thought the two seat Flanker a fine looking 'plane ever since Heller brought theirs out in the very early 90s. When Zvezda announced theirs I was very keen to get one and was even more excited when the decals included Red 10...the only Russian Flanker done in this very smart overall grey. I've occasionally wondered if it isn't dressed to replicate a Strike Eagle for the purposes of DACT, but whatever the reason, the scheme suits the graceful lines of Sukhoi's thoroughbred. Completely OOB, with paints from Tamiya; the overall grey was XF63 if anyone's interested. The engine covers were Mig Ammo and heat staining with Tamiya clear yellow, blue and smoke. Would highly recommend it; have the Su27SM and Su30SM in the stash!
    3 points
  11. The kit is from the polish manufacturer Mr hobby kit or something like that. The instructions are dire. I used the smer instructions. The kit was under £10 delivered and came with plenty of decals. I chose the Polish ones. Not the best build, and the greens are wrong. But I enjoyed it never the less.
    3 points
  12. Hello all. I used to build models decades ago. Life got in the way, but so did flying and working on my own aircraft. Now it's time to get back to models. There are some obvious experts on here regarding not just models but also the technical details of the real machines. I look fwd to the discussions.
    2 points
  13. Some Branston Pickle and aged cheddar, finally.
    2 points
  14. My dad once again, asked me if I could share his work here, and I'm doing that with all my pleasure. This time, and after so many models he did in the military version, he turned for a bit into civil aviation again. Don't ask me how he find it or where I have no clue at all, but one day my dad came home with a DC-3 from Revell in his hands. This kit from 2004, brings two options: the paint scheme of KLM or the paint scheme of Swissair. After some time considering, we've decoded to pick up the Swissair livery. Despite in the end I was more for the KLM one. Well we can save the decals for a later version who knows By what we could check from the box art and also by pictures online this was the paint we needed to recreated in our Dakota. So basically in the beginning. my dad attached the main fuselage and started to sand. After this job was completed he then puttied it and again it sanded. For what he told me this kit didn't had much gaps, so the job was kinda easy. After that he redesigned the fuselage lines and by now this is how the model looks like: Next, my dad inserted the engine nacelles and also the covers, and by him, this was a bit challenging because the pieces didn't fit with each other so he had to use a bit of force and compression for them to remain in their position. After that he put the primer to check some imperfections. I need to confess that I'm actually a bit surprised with this kit from Revell, as because it seems very accurate for me when it comes to shapes and also angles! And with this silver layer, the kit started to gain some Dakota style Here is the guy! And if I am not mistaken with the permeant silver layer. After that my dad started to paint the wings and also the elevators leading edges in black juts like we saw on the pictures. Since my dad doesn't like the "typical travel agency plane" as he normally says, the decided to pop up the lines of the aircraft a bit and dirty them a bit. For that he used the typical black panner line ink. He tool this picture during the first layer on the right wing and since I'm not with him this is the only picture I have for you about this After that the main things were done: Black nose, and the remaining black stripes on the wings, elevators and tail. Looks like in a gap of 1 week this airplane is practically done! By the pictures, the propellers were all black with yellow stripes and he also made them already! When it comes to the landing gear and wheels I don't know how's the status, but looks like it can be a subject for continue this trend. For one post there's too much pictures! See you around!
    2 points
  15. One battered and beaten jack block...now needs the brackets for mounting.
    2 points
  16. Must have seen the smoke from the engines on the boxart and jumped to conclusions. They will probably also target MiGs and Sukhois for the same reason.
    2 points
  17. Hiya Folks, Well we all know the silly mistakes made with the new Mossie kit,...... re the TT.35 bomb doors and rear bulge instead of the bomber parts,....... but these aside I was really pleased with the new kit. Hopefully I have covered some fixes here in my WIP if it is of any interest; Well Freightdog Models have released a pair of sets to help sort out the bomber version and also a set of flat bomb bay doors plus H2S blister ,..... with more sets in the pipeline. I have used both sets to build; A B.35 from 14 Sqn based at Wahn, West Germany during the late 1940`s; The unit also features in this fabulously atmospheric painting by Anthony Cowland GAvA depicting 14 Sqn Mossies down at low level during an exercise attack against the UK from its German base; And a PR.XVI of 684 Sqn based in India, SEAC during 1945; Here are the models; First off,.... the B.35, with decals from Freightdog Models too; And the 684 Sqn PRXVI with decals from the spares box; Cheers, Tony
    2 points
  18. Hello everybody, This is 1/32 Special Hobby Westland Whirlwind Mk.1 with the markings of P6985 HE-J No 263 sqr RAF, Exeter air base March 1941. Model build OOB except for Eduard seat belts and CMK wheels set. Paints are Gunze Sangyo acrylics. Happy Modelling
    2 points
  19. Finally posting this on RFI, as I explained at the end of my WIP thread the build was cut a little short so there's no Blue Steel yet, but that kind of makes sense since it's in a configuration suitable for a parked up Vulcan. I made a number of corrections and adjustments to the kit as I built it, all of which is recorded in my WIP thread. This is everything from basics like missing details from the landing gear to getting the various blisters under the wing right for this airframe in 1966. Overall I'm quite happy with this, there are parts I could have done better but it all looks just about right. In hindsight I'd have gone for a different airframe, this one had an unusual green tail cap instead of black and i think that it would be nice to have that on this model. I won't bother writing up my opinions on this kit in full here, you can read them in the WIP, but in short it's a very good model in terms of shape and options, but the details are disappointing as many are missing or slightly wrong (presumably due to an over-reliance on LIDAR scans when museum examples aren't perfect representations of service aircraft). And of course they did the wrong variant, I'd like a B1 but that's down to personal taste Of course I had to take some pictures with a Valiant and a Victor The real XM594 is of course one of the nineteen surviving Vulcans, on outdoors display at Newark Air Museum A few WIP photos:
    2 points
  20. Whatever. I really think you've taken my comments more seriously than they were intended. Most people just roll their eyes and ignore me, knowing I'll try anything to bend the topic towards Yak-9's (Ha! Did it again!), and I'm okay with that. My day will come. John
    2 points
  21. Hi all, Here's a rarer kit, with many thanks to @bootneck for selling it to me at a most agreeable price This was one of the harder builds I've done, as I am not very familiar with building full resin kits; the kit was also a bit of a challenge as it was solid resin, so lining everything up was quite a challenge. On top of that, some of the parts weren't fully formed and there were a fair few air bubbles in a lot of the parts. I drilled and pinned a the components to ensure a strong construction (although this didn't stop me knocking the tail off)! Despite this, I was happy with the build. I replaced the kit ejection seat with a resin one and CAD modelled and 3D printed the following parts: Fuselage spine intake Undercarriage legs Wing fences Cockpit interior Underwing stores (fuel tanks and buddy pod - I still need to put propellers on the buddy pod!) I also replaced the kits vacform canopy with my own DIY vacform, having CAD modelled and 3D printed the mould. The decals were a mixture of Xtradecal, Fantasy Printshop and homemade (underwing serials and tail beer mug), painted using Hataka brush acrylics and humbrol white spray. Overall, I'm very pleased with the result, if a little rough around the edges close up. It looks a little wonky tail-on Love this view! Thanks for looking! Ben
    2 points
  22. Can't believe it's been over a month since I last updated - life has got in the way, with a bit of returning to the office in London for the day job (sadly..) So the build has lurched from highly precise focused detailing, to low end agrigultural heavy engineering.. I was getting carried away in the cockpit at a time when there is still loads of basic structural stuff to be done.. ..first up, there is nothing for the UC bays - these are unfortunately really complex so I am going to have to simplify when the time comes to detailing as otherwise I will be in there for months on end.. ..they don't look so bad here, but trust me there is a lot going on both structurally and in bits & bobs credit to the photographer shown ..I started by taking a slice of the plan drawing I have and drawing out the area I need to cut out that sits below the skin - also added ribbing locations as far as I could determine from photo's ..then cut into the balsa cores - you can see the brass reinforcement plates put in ages ago to hold the gear legs later.. ..you can also see how the wheel cut-out area eats right into the fuselage exposing the structure and lego blocks in there (!)... ..floors were marked out in card with the rib positions.. ..after the floors were added, walls were added and a few gaps & dinks filled in.. as the wings slide on and off the wheel bay area is fixed to the wing but slides out from the fuselage as one.. ..and with a shot of primer the basics are there to build on - I have a guy coming from Axminster lathes on friday to fix my little C2 (no power) so hope to start turning the legs and epoxy in the mounting stubs in the next few weeks ..the next bit I had been putting off are the mould bucks for the transparencies - if you see the shape of the main hood you can see why I was stalling.. ..I also found this drawing which I took as good enough to get some profiles.. ..first step was to get some outline boundaries from the plans and translate them to 3D so I can see basics like the angle of the windshield and the shapes generally.. ..I made up a plastic card frame with flat parts front and back so the blown bit starts at the right point - this is coloured black with a sharpie so I can see my sanding limit after I fill it - if you don't the card is white when you hit it and stays white while you sand right through the boundary (tell me how I know..).. ..filled with P38 and first pass sanded.. ..primered and nearly done - the blown bits look ok in the end.. ..same with the rear - balsa used to save on filler.. ..and this is where they are at.. ..anyone who has seen my build logs will know I HATE doing transparencies - they are my nemesis.. I spoke to John Wilkes (Tigger) and got some great advice on how to turn these masters into masters to actually get good pulls from. The main problem now is that these have a lot of filler & primer and the heat of the plastic causes that to melt, deform, delaminate onto your canopy etc. What he said was use them to get one good shape pull using PETG and the fill that pull with Filler like Herculite to make a better master that can take the punishment.. so that's where I am at - until next time Peter
    2 points
  23. Not the most unusual subject to be presented here, of course, but here's another little Airfix Hurri. It's built out of the box in 85 Sqn markings with just some seat straps added. I've done a few of these now, and better options are available in this scale, so this will be the last - I think... With my last attempt at this kit: Best wishes, Ian
    2 points
  24. Perhaps the one WW2 fighter for which top-rate kits exist for all variants already. ( OK, maybe not the trainer(s), but trainers aren't best-sellers anyway.) None of which bring money to Eduard, of course, and what's a range of models without a Zero? However, I wouldn't have thought it likely to sell as many as a top-rate kit of some other leading WW2 fighters not in the Eduard range already. It's not my money, of course, and I don't doubt it will sell - but it isn't going to blow the modelling world away.
    2 points
  25. Matchbox 1/72 Fairey Seafox HMS Arethusa, 713 Catapult Flight Kalafrana, Malta, 1939
    2 points
  26. Seeming not. He seemed to have had a change of gender, in order to try and avoid you but when I mentioned the Georgia incident, he started gibbering "wibble", locked himself in the heads and poured super glue in the lock mechanism. His staff have sent for the Fire Brigade, a team of very experienced negotiators and indented for one straight jacket (Extra strong, Generals for the use of). I hope he is a bit better in time for Tuesday and my next appointment. My hopes aren't high. Pessimistic of Mars
    2 points
  27. Well its job done and some pictures before I knock off the 4 nose probes. Colin
    2 points
  28. Kawasaki Ki-10 'Perry' 2nd Daitai 1st Chutai Tianjin, China 1937/38 Lt. Kosuke Kawahara, 3rd Shotai Leader 1/48 FineMolds Ki-10-II converted to Ki-10-I. Please find build log here. Thanks for the inspiring groupbuild which pushed me beyond OOB modelling again. Michael
    2 points
  29. All of the remaining side panels were cut and glued in place. Milliput was applied to all of the joints and then left to harden before rubbing down. Six bolt heads glued around the opening for the MG 34. The hatch was made from three pieces of .5mm card (base and two hatch lids). To this I added the hinges which are pieces of stretched sprue and the end pieces 10x40 thou strip. Unfortunately, I'd forgotten to cut the viewing slits before fixing the panels in place. So a couple of hours were spent, marking the positions, drilling them with a .4mm bit, and then opening them up with a scalpel blade. Just in front of the hatch is a periscope. This was made from one taken from the Academy M51 kit and cut in half and glued to the roof. The surrounding frame was cut from .5mm card, drilled out and cut to shape, and then finished off with some very careful sanding, before gluing in place. It's not exactly prototypical, but I don't have a clear photo of one mounted in one of these vehicles. There are three protrusions around the base of the turret, which are for the internal cranks for hand turning the turret. The bases were sliced from the ends of appropriate sized sprue, with a nut and bolt head glued to each centre. MG34 also in place. Finally. A couple of shots of the fixed MG position. That's it for this update. Not a lot more to do now. Just the headlamps and some kit and other gear to add, and then it will be ready for some paint. Thanks for watching. John.
    2 points
  30. Bristol Mk. 32 Freighter '698' RCAF Europe 1960s; . 1/144th scale . Welsh Models Vac form kit. Decals from kit and other generic sets.
    2 points
  31. Minicraft 1/48 Cessna 150 Not much I can say about this kit except I did my best on a kit that's a bit lacking.
    2 points
  32. Greetings from Alberta! Where y'at? Chris
    1 point
  33. Our day will come, John. Back to the Zero, I'm not a big fan, but I might be interested in an early version (A6M3 Model 32) or the Rufe floatplane. Regards, Jason
    1 point
  34. Wish I had left my Magna kit in the box. Do I need another Flamingo? What next from Valom, a Hastings would be nice?
    1 point
  35. The generic HGW sets might have what you need, just have to find the right spacing. (They do silver ones as well)
    1 point
  36. Well, here's my first (and last) attempt at French 'black outline' camouflage. The tan base was sprayed, the green painted by hand, and the black outlines with a Sharpie pen and a wobbly hand. A quick test on the hull sides shows that Sharpie ink gets on OK with W&N varnish, so no worries there for the rest of it. Usually I'm getting towards the end at this point, because I do the whole assembly before painting, but a quick look at the sprues shows that I've still got a fair way to go. I'm also going to add a commander figure on his little perch on the turret hatch, so there'll be more horror to follow
    1 point
  37. Yep, one of these will look great in display cabinet alongside my valom DH 91 Albatross!
    1 point
  38. The Airfix 1/48 Meteor 8 is the first 1/48 model I have completed in over 40 years! The build was a kind of commission for a friend, Bob. The model was bought for him as he had an uncle who served in 85 squadron on Meteors back in the day. Although Bob likes to build the occasional model, he is not by his own admission an experienced modeller and he found the contents of the box and the instructions quite daunting. He wanted it to be built by an experienced modeller, and he couldn’t find one of those so he chose me! The brief was simple, straight out of the box, no additions, no super detailing, just the kit as is. Since returning to the hobby around 7 years ago, an OOB build would be a pleasure, as I just can’t stop myself from deviating and adding detail. My first reaction having built almost entirely 1/72 and 1/144 aircraft, was that this was big! I’d like to say construction was straight forward, but it was not. It’s a nice kit, with excellent detail, but this one had some serious warping on the rear fuselage, which took some heavy clamping and superglue to fix. I also found some of the fit of parts not the best, but at least it comes out looking like a Meteor, and I’m certainly intending to build more 1/48 aircraft now, and probably more Meteors, having a Sword NF14 and a Classic Airframes FR9 in the stash, both 1/48. Those will not be OOB..... Although I did not do a WIP for this build, I did keep a reasonable photographic record on the way, so some of that is shown here. I used Vallejo metallic for the first time ever, probably a risky gamble on someone else’s model. They were ok(ish) but needed sealing as soon as possible for handling. They tended to rub off quite easily Dull Aluminium was used for the whole airframe and Dark Aluminium for the U/C internals. Initially the whole airframe was given several light dustings of Ammo Satin Acrylic. This was not a good result for me, remaining sticky and weirdly white slightly white in appearance. I left the model for some weeks deciding what to do, then on some recommendations gave the model a coat of Mr Hobby GX gloss, which hardened the finish and seemed to resolve the white issue. Phew! The Airfix decals are simply superb, if just a tad (hugely) numerous in the stencil area. This process took over a week, doing areas step by step, using the proven Micro set and Micro sol processes. The one area where I did not use the decals was for the yellow rectangles along the cockpit canopy bottom edges. Too many very small shapes to line up, so I masked them off and sprayed them yellow! A final sealing coat of Humbrol Acrylic gloss, followed a few days later by Humbrol Acrylic Satin. So here are some of the build pics, followed by a good few completion shots. And @Fritag @bigbadbadge @keefr22 and @RidgeRunner and any others who made such gracious comments in my glider build, the wait is over, hope you enjoy! So this is the box of parts that Bob gave me to work with: First up, the dreaded warping, easily discovered during test fits. This part looks ok....... But look at the rear! An out of focus shot, but you get the idea... Lots of other clamping needed: Fuselage fixed and wing to fuselage gaps filled with slaters finest: Some primer in the engine bays: Cockpit and seat painted with instrument detail picked out with paint. The internal detail on this is pretty good as it comes, although I would love to have used an aftermarket seat! Bob wanted the Derwents in, to be displayed. I used the basic kit parts, with paint to bring out details. These would be crying out for superdetailing! Primer coat used was Mig Ammo one shot grey. First coat of Dull Aluminum: And finally, much decalling and sealing later, we have a Meteor F8, OOB! Just noticed I need some black pin wash in those gun ejector chuts! And now with engines exposed Thanks for looking. Terry
    1 point
  39. Good afternoon I would prefer Eduard to downscale their Mustang in 1/72 .... Best regards Patrice
    1 point
  40. Fresh off the bench is the Italeri 1/72 F-111 Aardvark I've decided to (inaccurately) model this as a RAAF F-111C, using some aftermarket decals (Aussie Decals). There is significant silvering evident in the photos, but it is exaggerated by the harsh light - it looks fine in the collection, and definitely looks the part when viewed from a foot or more away. I dressed up the interior with an Eduard PE set designed for the Hasegawa kit, and posed the canopy open to show it off. In the end, a pretty simple kit, which is surprisingly massive compared to the rest of my 1/72 collection. Thanks for viewing - CC always welcome.
    1 point
  41. The sponsons are built almost entirely from flat plates, exactly as the real thing was. This was the only way for Meng to incorporate crisp detail on both sides of the pieces. I found the best way to build it was to go slowly, so the glue would set a little, but not so slowly that the joints set completely. This allowed me to make adjustments as I went along. I was puzzled by the rivets inside this closed box (it will be closed when this end goes on) Aha! That's what the rivets are for. It's still pretty much invisible unless some fool incorporates battle damage. Looking good. I left it to set completely, resting in the location on the side plate as a kind of jig to ensure good alignment. This is the roof of the sponson, not attached yet. That line of incomplete rivets is one of the very rare examples of errors on this kit. As there's only half a dozen of them, I might make some dome shapes from stretched sprue later. I'm absolutely loving the way the interior is getting busier day by day. There's still a ton of details and lots of painting to add even more interest. This is my first full interior kit and won't be my last. It's very good value for money, when you divide the cost by the potential hors spent. I say potential because I have noticed that I'm now starting to build larger sub assemblies before painting. I could spend even more time if I had stuck to the original plan of painting almost every piece individually. I wonder why I'm slipping back into my old ways? It's partly my customary impatience, partly the dawning realisation that a lot of this detail will not be seen. Consider those fuel tanks, for example, you can hardly see them now and when the other side is attached, they will be even less obvious.
    1 point
  42. Just getting myself sorted to start this doozy.
    1 point
  43. Well.... I guess I shall try and post this update again then! So, the first step was the rudder pedals. And yes, I had to look twice at the part.... The one piece seats.... The throttle quad got glued to the main IP These were, hands down, the fiddliest things I've assembled to date.... The rear bulkhead then got stuck in place The bloody ejector pin markers here annoy me. But alas, they shall be all but invisible once sealed up so they shall remain.... Then it was out with the Tamiya Fine Grey Primer, masking tape and NATO Black... This got stuck the following evening.... And then these holes claimed the life of my last 0.8mm drill bit. The remaining stub was buried with full honours in the bin but unfortunately, the head was a snack for the carpet monster. Some very rough splotches of Model Air Olivegrun & Desert Yellow. Not my best brushwork but this cockpit will be tucked away. Then a forest of bulkheads appeared overnight! So I sprayed it with some Tamiya primer and gave them a cheeky little preshade.... Along with the fuselage halves for the passenger cabin, And then once again, Model Air Olivegrun... Annoyingly, I glued the overhead lights a bit too early and they got knocked off during the installation of the seats. But silver linings, they were much easier to paint like this. On a side note, I have managed to acquire the Ops Record Book for 267 Squadron as digitized records are currently free from the National Archives. It makes for rather mundane reading but simultaneously, interesting. I've also ordered a bunch of Mig Oilbrushers and their thinner to have a good dabble in the weathering stages. I had an absolute nightmare getting the seats installed however which bugged me beyond belief as the test fits were perfect but the TET melted the locator pins. The Model Air didn't like my airbrush once again as it orange peeled slightly or pooled in places, despite going over lightly, Once the oils arrive, I'll look to get the bulkheads assembled and "oiled". I may even do a slight bit of chipping on the walls.... I really don't know yet! Ciao!
    1 point
  44. PZL P.24b Bulgarian VNVV "Yastreb" 22-1 1937 1/48 Mirage Hobby Build log can be found here: Ray
    1 point
  45. Wings fitted. This instructions actually say "dihedral height is 28mm at the wing tips so us a Humbrol tin to get this correct" Can't argue with that! Colin
    1 point
  46. More work done on the Skymaster, now that the Bristol Freighter is finished. Cockpit innards are done, with a bit of scratch building for the shelf that holds the radios instead of the rear seats. The instrument panel and control wheels were pretty decent and were just painted. The thickness of the transparencies means there is not a lot to see. The new nose gear has been built from Albion Alloys N/S tube set into the original nosewheel fork and new main wheels have come from the bits box. I think they are from a Phantom. The fuselage is together and is an indifferent fit. What the kit completely omits are any provision for the engine exhausts, presumably Airfix thought the exhaust gases would build up in the fuselage and either a) the aircraft blows up or b) the pilot is overcome with carbon monoxide poisoning and the plane crashes. To rectify this, after looking at a lot of photos, I have drilled some holes to take some brass tubes to act as exhaust pipes. My chosen airframe is to be 608 and recent photos show this in very good condition with landing lights mounted in the nose rather than the wings and with no pylons and a different aerial fit. The next job I am in the middle of is getting the windscreen to fit the fuselage, I actually feel I am getting somewhere with this kit, although not relishing sorting the tail booms out.
    1 point
  47. Once I'd got to the stage where the chassis and all ancillary equipment was installed, I made a start on the rear part of the A/C. My original intention was to scratch build the armour from card, but working out how it fit with the chassis was proving too much for my brain. So it was over to Plan B. This proved to be much easier. I used the kit's side pieces and altered them to fit with the drawings. I removed the front part which angled inwards and then cut off the top part. All of the detail such as rivets and handles were removed with a chisel blade and a fine sanding stick, and the groove between two plates just above the wheel arch was filled in with putty and rubbed down. The two side plates were glued in place and left to dry. Meantime, I cut a new back plate from .5mm card. I could have used the kit's part, but there would have been a lot more work involved, removing all of the moulded on detail, filling holes and cutting down to size. I chamfered the edges and then glued it in place. Along all of the top edges I added some strips of card so that there would be more surface to bond to once the upper plates were installed. Going by the drawings, I added the rivets to the two side panels and the rear plate. They're not domed, but once the paint goes on it should look OK. I made a bulkhead and glued it in place. This would support the angled sides and rear plates, and the roof. The rear angled plate was cut from two sheets of .5mm card (one slightly smaller that the other all round) and laminated together, with a window cut out in the outer sheet, and then glued in place. Well, that's the sum total of my weekend's work, so now it's time for the boring stuff........cutting the grass before the week of rain arrives that we have forecast. Thanks for looking. John.
    1 point
  48. Only a little update – I’ve been busy with the diorama for this build; great fun with the coffee stirrers and so on! The rivets are done at last, and the body prepped for primer and paint. For those who didn't see my previous scratchbuild, the rivets are "nail caviar" - intended for blinging up your talons, but they're a convenient (and cheap) source of very small and reasonably consistent balls which I glue into slightly undersized holes drilled into the plastic.
    1 point
  49. Nearly there with the internals.... I used a piece of aluminium wire wrapped round a paintbrush handle to form the steering wheel and glued it onto the plastic cross I’d already made up. This was painted with enamels and given a black oil wash. With that done, it was time to button up the body by fixing the floor in place. Unfortunately, with the addition of the coffee stick floorboards, it failed to either click inside the walls or sit neatly under them, as the boards clashed with the internal rivets. I resorted to trimming down the base, including the floorboards, and popped it inside. Not a terribly great fit, with gaps evident all round, so I glued the whole lot down onto a piece of 0.5mm plastic card (left overnight under a pile of books) which was trimmed down afterwards. I wish I’d had some black card for this to help the gaps disappear into shadow, but hopefully the white gaps won’t be too evident in the end. Here’s how the front and back now look, including the steering wheel. I did a bit more work on the bonnet; scribing the side access panels (should really have done this before I glued it together) and adding various hinges, louvres and catches. The whole thing also got glued onto the front of the main body. Back to the rivet pot now!
    1 point
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