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  1. This is the Anigrand 1/72 Republic XF-84H (originally designated the XF-106), not so affectionally known as the Thunderscreech due to shockwave created by the supersonic propeller. The XF-84H was an attempt to create a supersonic fighter using a supersonic propeller and a turboprop engine. It was created from an F-84F Thunderstreak by; replacing the Wright J65-W-3 turbojet engine with an Allison XT40-A-1 turboprop, installing a new nose holding an Aeroproducts propeller, moving the air intakes to the wing root similar to the RF-84F Thunderflash, and using a T-tail. As noted the propeller was extremely loud and produced hypersonic shockwaves that would cause nausea, headaches and other symptom in the ground crew. Unlike the similarly equipped the XF-88B (that I will attempt to build later this year) that retained its turbojet engines the Thunderscreech only had the turboprop engine so the propeller needed to be used for taxiing, takeoffs and landings. The kit was all resin, including the clear canopy. I found the resin to be soft, very flexible and to have no pinholes, bubbles or voids so Anigrand has definitely gotten their act together when it comes to casting resin. However both fuselage halves and the wings were warped. This was corrected with the help of a heat gun. Fit was typical. I again filled the trench like panel lines with Mr. Surfacer 500. The decals worked fine with 2 exceptions; the FS-059 markings were too long for the space between the propeller hub and intake. I printed smaller ones with my laser printer. Also they were very shiny and the film did not disappear into the NMF. I gave them an overcoat to AK Real Color Satin Varnish that helped. Metallic colors were Alclad and other colors were AK Real Color. The pitot tubes were from a Master Mig 17 set. My regular camera was acting up on me so the pictures were taken with my iPhone. Next up will be the Anigrand McDonnell XF-88A Enjoy
    31 points
  2. Hi All, This is my first post in a Scale Model forum, please excuse the poor photo quality. I started building aircraft scale models 10 years ago and thought I should join with other scale modelers and show some of my work. At the moment I am working on a Me262 1/48 (Tamiya) with open Jumo004 resin engines from the Aires detail set. Until this project is finished I would like to kick-off with some photos of my FW190 Project. It is the Eduard kit with Eduard details sets for engine and gun bays. Hope you enjoy it! Let me know what you think. Cheers, Alex
    24 points
  3. Pretty much out of the box. Didn’t weather this one, as pictures show clean aircraft.
    19 points
  4. So, here we have my second build of these 'small ships'. The closeup photos, as always, do not really work, these models are always best when viewed with the 'naked eye'. I hope you like these few, not very good, photos. Jon
    13 points
  5. Hi All. Here is my latest finished model. Roden Boeing 720B kit with my own Maersk decals. The blue is painted with Halfords Ford Olympic Blue which is a very close match to Xtracolor Maersk blue Cheers Ray
    12 points
  6. My real world has been a bit busy to make a proper start at the Hurricane for the last couple of weeks - so it’s mostly been pinching time here and there in the virtual world to refine the S gun pod and the S gun itself. Thanks again G, I’ve slimmed down the pod generally and especially at the front, as you highlighted. I agree that the pod is less-chubby than is often illustrated. I’ve also added the little hatch on the side you pointed out. Ta. And in the corporeal world. I can’t make up my mind how much the pod flares out at the top where it meets the underwing; so as you can see I’ve modelled two versions, one with a wider flared top to the pod (underneath in this photo) than than the other. I’m favouring the wider one. And largely with the help of the additional photos @Troy Smith posted, but also a nod of thanks to @gingerbob I’ve finished the S Gun itself to a level of detail I think is adequate and doable for 1/48 scale. In the absence of a schematic diagram - and any real understanding of the architecture if guns - I can’t swear to the fine detail; but it’s at least a decent ‘stand-off’ scale effort. By dint of some judicious surface modelling and thickening in sections (Fusion can be frustratingly resistant to shelling complex bodies or thickening complex surfaces) I’ve also managed to model the gun pod halves as separate thin shells, so one pod can be displayed removed from the S Gun. The pod halves are modelled at 0.3mm thick, so the next question is whether they’ll print successfully. A question soon answered as it happens. Fragile but doable and useable. And whilst I don’t plan to display the pod halves on a gun - they do fit around it - honest. Thanks @gingerbob. That particular photo was very useful. I think - or perhaps assume is a better word, that those ‘prongs’ you refer to are the front mountings for the underwing fuel tank. I’m assuming that because they’re in more or less the right place to perform that function - but I haven’t got a reference confirming it. Happy to be corrected by someone more learned in such matters. Now I’m not a stickler for 100% accurate outlines on my models, as long as they look right; but I have to say the the Arma Hurricane seems to compare very favourably with the Arthur Bentley drawings I have: And the tubular framing in the cockpit compares well n’all: Which makes me think that, seeing as I’m going to open up a side panel or two I ought to think about producing a bit of the internal structure behind the pilot’s seat - with a nod to Gerald Scarborough’s work on the Airfix 1/24 scale Hurricane in the ‘Classic Aircraft’ book from the mid 70’s. I think it depends on how much of the insides can be seen once I’ve removed the panel. The Arthur Bentley plans suggest that a desert survival pack was fitted in the rear fuselage of most tropical Hurricanes and that might be fun to represent - if I can find any references if what it looked like. I’d have to open at least one of the rear-most hatches - behind the seat, and so I’d definitely have to produce some internal framework. I also plan to draw and print some replacement engine exhausts. Most but not all the 6 sqn Hurricane IIds had fishtail exhausts on the Merlin XX’s. I printed some fishtail exhausts on the Defiant build and I think it’ll be a nice upgrade here too. Finally for now, I’ve been thinking about the colour of the pilot’s seat and internal tubular frames. I know - or at least think I know (after having read many posts on BM on the subject) that early Hurricanes (at least) had aluminium painted frames and seats. But I also think (by which I mean I’ve seen t’others such more learned such as Troy speak on the subject) that later on - perhaps by 1942, the frame and seat were interior green. Now the earliest 6 sqn IId that I’ll model will have been built in February 1942, and it’s more likely that I’ll do one built in August 1942 so the question is whether I can just paint everything interior green or whether I have to break out the aluminium (I hope not). If anyone has any info on this please feel free to comment. So that’s as far as I’ve for got for now. Must actually glue something together soon…
    12 points
  7. Italeri reboxing of 1/48 Ocidental kit, built more-or-less OOB (wheels and exhaust stack from the spares box an improvement) to represent a Mk IX Spit of the Italian Co-belligerent Air Force that was stripped of paint when it was turned over to them by the RAF. Later it would be sold on to the Israelis. First attempt at a bare metal finish, I used a Humbrol Metalcote rattlecan. Bit rough and ready but looks ok on the shelf! Ta for looking.
    11 points
  8. 10 points
  9. The blue was a little too matt, and also I felt the decals needed a glossier surface, so I sprayed the decal areas with a thin gloss varnish. The decals where slow to react to my settings solutions but gave in given some time. The rather strong Solvaset was used on the rudders. I cut the “SR-N1” and “NRDC” to individual pieces to make it easier over the duct ribs. All blue areas and the rudders were then finished with a coat of satin varnish before removing the last masking.
    9 points
  10. The painting is about completed other than the engines. Attention will now go to modifying the figures and getting them to jump together. My only concern is breaking the resin figures while fixing them. Tiny resins tend to be brittle. How’s my smile?
    9 points
  11. They probably thought that the crew would easily discern if the engines were shut off or not, but not notice the huge pole with a hook on one end hanging between them.... Thanks for the praise anyway, much appreciated! Glad you do, Bill - thank you! If it's a build of mine, yes, it's good Not even close to NBS, though Actually, it is odd how I deeply admire your super clean and smooth builds and at the same time I'd never build a model that way (very likely because I'm not able too...) Also, I would never add the struts at a very early stage like you do, but that's because I'm positive I'd break them off Cheers Johnny, thank you! You are way too kind! Apologies for the lack of updates, but I've been busy with work; I did manage some progress over the last WE though, so here goes: seats completed by highlighting a few areas, adding a black tempera wash and airbrushing a final W&N Galeria Flat Clear coat and glued in place Then I added the main struts and wheel wells doors and the front wheels strut and doors I also definitively completed the decalling job, by putting the last ones on the AIM9 missiles: These missiles and their decals come from the dedicated Finemolds set, and in this case I very much appreciated the fact that all the stenciling was contained in one single decal per weapon. Trickier to apply, but a lot less hassle than with individual stencils, if you ask me. They now need a bit of dirtying up and a flat coat, then I should be on the final stretch and complete the model (hopefully by the WE). That's it for this update, all comments welcome. Ciao
    9 points
  12. The basic hull has been sprayed in two shades of aluminium. It might be better with a more greyish colour A little brush painting of details has also been done. Most parts have got their colours applied too. I sprayed all four rudders gloss white in the hope of only brush painting some black after the decals have been applied to finish them. Here the aft (rear) rudders are masked for yellow. I found no blue paint in my collection that felt right, so I made a mix. I have no idea if it is right...
    9 points
  13. Another one finished from the shelf of doom. God, I love these old Peerless kits. I built most of them when Airfix originally released them. I've always thought these kits were great considering their age, although I don't know how accurate they are as I'm no rivet counter. Anyway, I decided to go on a nostalgia trip and bought the White Scout Car, I also wanted to finish it in something other than green. Built as per kit but I added a stowage rack on the rear and the stowage is from the spares box, markings were from surplus decals I had lying around. The white star and ring are too small but it's all that I had at the time. The paint. Many years ago I bought some White Ensign enamel paint, mainly to use as a reference point. This is the first time I've used it (in this case, Light Mud) and it's wonderful, good opacity, matt finish and spot on colours, at least to my eyes. The black is Vallejo Black Grey, the tarp is Vallejo Khaki, though it got weathered down so much that it ended up close to Dry Mud, which is not exactly what I wanted. Weathered with oils using Rinaldi's OPR technique. (see here for more info) Nostalgia builds are risky, the realities don't usually match the memories, but this one nailed it. I'd really like to do the Command Car and the Ambulance (the only Peerless Dodge kit I never built) but both of them go for silly money nowadays. Hopefully Italeri will release them in the future.
    8 points
  14. Thanks for asking, it was painted freehand with a hairy stick. After a couple of coats of clear the decals have gone on. P1060999 by timothy jones, on Flickr Meanwhile I've made a start on the 109. Wings and cockpit have been assembled and painted. P1060996 by timothy jones, on Flickr P1060997 by timothy jones, on Flickr More soon.
    8 points
  15. Hi all, out of the box build (beware the wheels as the fit isn't great). Tamiya and Vallejo paints, Flory wash, AMMO dry brush, Mr Metal Color. Last pic with I Love Kit's M48A1 for size comparison ttfn 😇
    7 points
  16. Hi folks, this is a Seafire MkIII PP935, as flown by S/Lt Morgan of 894 Sqn onboard HMS Indefatigable, January 1945. The aircraft probably took part in Operation Lentil where it provided air over for the fleet as Pangkalan Brandan was attacked on 4th Jan 1945. The aircraft had a mishap into the barrier on 6 Jan 1945. Firstly thankyou to@iang, @Troy Smith @Seahawk @Graham Boak and the others that contributed to this thread: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235032687-seafire-nn460-894-sqn/&tab=comments#comment-2933488 The kit is a mish-mash of Airfix Spit Vb fuselage, Seafire XVII wings, old Airfix Seafire parts and some resin undercarriage legs by Airwaves (I think). Finished with Hataka paints, Oil paints and pigment dusting. Plenty of filler used to blend various parts together but I guess it looks like a Seafire III. I have a Special Hobby kt on the go as well so I can compare once that's done. All roundels were masked and sprayed, the letters and serial are decals from a mixture. The code letters Xtradecal supply with their offering of this aircraft (well NN460) are too small. The ones used were Xtradecals generic 'Sky' letters. Thanks for looking and if any of you are near Midhurst on Sunday 11th, pop in to the Grange where Tangmere Sector modellers will be displaying and I will have mostly FAA with me on display. https://www.facebook.com/fleetfighters/
    7 points
  17. Indeed, you'd better get your skates on.....time waits for no man or Martian. Yes, delicious wasn't it, one of Baldrick's better efforts, sort of lingers playfully on the tongue, with a distinctively meaty/rancid aftertaste. No wonder you were lisping/limping so badly that night. This time, tell her to use steel wool...that last one barely took the blast from Baldrick's most potent broadside. Regarding the goat, Douglas died in unfortunate circumstances after losing a drunken bet with Darling so we did the decent thing and served him up with a good Beaujolais and a ha'p'orth of mushy peas. He'd have wanted it that way.........as a consequence, I think I have your ribbons here Look, I have been paying attention, we're off to the races.......during Martian's extended sleepover I managed to get a bit of Zeppelinning done, not a lot but I did manage to bung some PE on my tiddler with the aid of a head-loupe, tweezers, the odd mug of cappuccino and an ungodly amount of swearing. .
    7 points
  18. Completed photos, 807 NAS, HMS Centaur, 1961
    7 points
  19. I have been doing 'not a lot' lately due to carrying the weight of ten tons of streaming head cold which leaves me quite brain fuddled (yes even more than usual) I've been given various theories from theorists of mystery and collusion though as to what it was and what caused it. voice #1: says "you've got a side effect from your COVID jab." Voice #2: says "you've got a side effect from your 'flu jab." Voice #3: me says "you caught a cold and we are all more vulnerable to colds or corona based infections nowadays, get over it!" So with the worst of it hopefully gone now a small, very small update to a couple of cockpits. With both helicopters yet unfinished (the HC2 and the HU5 Rescue bird) and bearing the same basic cockpit interior I have added the same bits and bobs to both. It may be boring, and very meagre fayre to you it will at lest allow me to bring the new builds forward a few pages (5) Switch and fuel control bodies added ready for some little outstanding detailing later. There will be similar, but less of 'em, additions to the rear wall console before I build the roof switchery This is ongoing, laters guys. Telford, three Saturdays away
    7 points
  20. Indeed Bill, a rare old time was had by all. A visit to the Dambusters Inn at Scampton last night for a rare old nosh up and convivialities, nicely rounded off what has been a wonderful week. Martian and the Martianess left Earth’s atmosphere earlier today arriving safely back on Wibble, a small asteroid (or was it hemorroid) just north of Mars, late this afternoon. Tally-ho and a yibbidy yap, with a dash of zing zang spillip, I yelled after him as we bullied orf for the final chukka. A rematch in the spring has been arranged…
    7 points
  21. Hello all, I finished this yesterday after a couple of months working on it: Hasegawa's 1/48 Phantom FG.1. I actually used the 111 Sqn/Black Mike boxing, but wanted an early RN airframe, so managed to get hold of some Hasegawa decals from the 2008 Ark Royal edition. They weren't great, so most of the larger markings have been masked and airbrushed, including me replicating the incorrect letter spacing in the ROYAL NAVY legend from the decals. The roundels are from Aeromaster. I chopped the serial up so I could model 010/XV588, which was not provided. There are a few modifications - Quickboost seats, Aires wheels (painted the wrong colour!), rebuilt fuel vent mast into a 'v' shape, anti-collision light cut out and made from clear UV resin, and braces between the splitter plates and the fuselage sides added from strip styrene. I don't like pylons, and since RN Phantoms often flew at air shows with them removed, decided I could leave them off. Because Hasegawa moulded the recessed detail incorrectly on the underside of the wing leading edge, I also painted this incorrectly. I enjoyed this build, especially the challenge of the multi-piece canopy and filling the shutlines with CA before rescribing them all. This is the tenth Hasegawa 1/48 Phantom I've made, and hopefully the last. I hope a full build article will be published in due course. More photos at https://jonbryon.com/hasegawa-1-48-mcdonnell-douglas-phantom-fg-1-2/ Comments welcome and thanks for looking. Jon
    6 points
  22. Long long ago, in a Universe far far away (Actually 12 miles North of Lincoln) another Star Wars ship is being created. Some time ago I gathered together unused parts from scrap Italeri and a Revell 1/48th A-10 Thunderbolts. Then recently I got hold of a gluebomb Star Wars Stap and Droid from the bay. I used witchcraft and TET to dismantle the Stap (The Droid is for another time) sat down and had a good long ponder. You probably know what an A-10 looks like. So here are the Stap bits that I'm mostly not going to use here. https://www.scalemates.com/products/img/4/0/1/135401-11104-pristine.jpg This is a link to a Scalemates picture of the Stap boxtop. The main part I'm using holds the guns. The part of the Stap that matters and part of the pre-butchered Aircraft. The previous owner had cut out various panels. It really is a patchwork job and card and filler will be used Profusely to make something decent (Hah!) from the wreckage. And here's a rough idea of where I'm heading. The ex Airfix 1/32nd scale car wheel in the foreground is next up. The wheel on the right has been chopped about and is snuggled up to a P-38 Lightning bit. And should sit something like this. An intake will be mated to the front of this assembly. And we should get something like this. There are various other bits to be added, obviously. But this is your basic interceptor. Next I need to get the cockpit sorted and the fuselage paneled up before joining the two main parts together. Thanks for looking, There may be another post at the weekend. Until then, stay safe & party on, Dudes!
    6 points
  23. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vc (A02108A) 1:72 Airfix The Spitfire was the champion of the Battle of Britain along with the Hurricane and a few other less well-known players, and it’s an aircraft with an amazing reputation that started as a bit of a damp squib in the shape of the Supermarine Type 224. This gull-winged oddity was the grandfather of the Spitfire, and despite losing out to the biplane Gloster Gladiator, designer R J Mitchell was spurred on to go back to the drawing board and create a more modern, technologically advanced and therefore risky design. This was the Type 300, and it was an all-metal construction with an incredibly thin elliptical wing that became legendary, although it didn’t leave much space for fuel, a situation that was worsened further by the Air Ministry’s insistence that four .303 machine guns were to be installed in each wing, rather than the three originally envisaged. It was a very well-sorted aircraft from the outset, so quickly entered service with few changes with the RAF in 1938 in small numbers initially. With the clouds of war building, the Ministry issued more orders and it became a battle to manufacture enough to fulfil demand in time for the outbreak and early days of war from September 1939 onwards. By then, the restrictive straight sided canopy had been replaced by a “blown” hood to give the pilot more visibility, although a few airframes with the old canopy still lingered for a while. The title Mk.Ia was given retrospectively to differentiate between the cannon-winged Mk.Ib that was re-armed with 20mm Oerlikon cannons after the .303s were found somewhat lacking compared to the 20mm cannon armament of their main opposition at the time, the Bf.109. As is usual in wartime, the designers could never rest on their laurels with an airframe like the Spitfire, as it had significant potential for development, a process that lasted throughout the whole of WWII, and included many changes to the Merlin engine, then the installation of the more powerful Griffon engine, as well as the reduction in height of the spine of the fuselage and creation of a bubble canopy to further improve the pilot’s situational awareness. Its immediate successor was the Mk.II that had a better Merlin engine and higher octane fuel to give it a healthy boost in performance. The IIa was armed identically to the Mk.Ia with four .303s in each wing, while the IIb carried the two 20mm cannons of the Ib and two .303s in each of the wings. It was followed by the Mk.V that had yet another more powerful Merlin fitted, which returned the fright of the earlier marks’ first encounters with Fw.190s by a similar increase in performance from an outwardly almost identical Spitfire. The C suffix referred to the type of wing fitted to the airframe, the C being the “universal” wing that could accommodate different armament configurations. The other armed wing-types were the .303 armed A, and the B wing that carried a single cannon per wing, with two .303 guns in the outer positions. The Kit This is a reboxing with new decals of the 2020 new tooling from Airfix, and is moulded in their new darker styrene that gives us a better look at the details before paint is applied. The kit arrives in a small red-themed top-opening box, and inside are four sprues of grey styrene, a clear sprue, decal sheet, and the instruction booklet that is printed in colour, with profiles of the decal options on the rear pages. Detail is excellent throughout, and the surface is covered with fine engraved panel lines, raised and recessed features, coupled with careful engineering of the parts, including consideration of them whilst still on the sprue, which is evidenced by a pair of protective runners on either side of the moulded-in cannon barrels. The clear parts are well-moulded, but the blown canopies are a little distorting as the detail viewed through them get further away. This would be best minimised by posing the canopy open, where it will be very close to the fuselage and rear glazing panel. A dip in some Klear/Future would also improve clarity a little, thanks to its self-levelling properties. Construction begins with a cockpit that will be familiar to anyone that has ever modelled a Spitfire, and builds up within a skin that forms the lower half of the interior, with moulded-in ribbing. The frame that the seat fits onto has the seat supports fixed in place, the lower interior port insert has the twin bottles in the rear, with the seat frame slotted in front, then adding a frame to the rear, and the instrument panel frame further forward, which has a decal for the dials. The cockpit floor, which is actually an accumulation of control lines and rods, it inserted in between the two forward frames, adding the spade-grip control column in the centre, then moving on to the seat, which is moulded as a single part, adding a lower layer that includes the flare rack and the seat armour at the rear. This is then glued into the floor between two guides, the starboard interior skin is detailed and the two halves are mated, fitting a short strengthening bulkhead to the front of the assembly, and the gunsight over the instrument panel. The fuselage halves are then taken out, fixing another small bottle to the starboard interior, and painting both sides as instructed before installing the cockpit, taking care to remove the cockpit sill from the fuselage halves if you plan to use the closed canopy to your model. A prop carrier is also inserted in the nose, and if the glue stays away, your prop will spin on the finished model, although woe betide anyone that dares to do so without your permission! The lower wing is full-span out to the ribs where the tips fit, and if you are planning to use the semi-conformal fuel tank, you’ll need to drill out two 1mm holes in the centre beforehand, fitting the rectangular and circular bay walls into the recesses around the cut-outs, and painting them accordingly. The upper wing halves have the bay roof detail moulded-in, so painting and weathering them at the same time will streamline painting, after which you can join the separate upper wing halves to the lower, choosing the uppers that have either clipped tips or the traditional tips that carry on the elliptical lines of the wings. The fuselage can then be mounted in the gap between the wings, choosing either a one-part smooth chin panel, or a two-part tropical filter alternative, depending on which decal option you have chosen. The ‘empennage’ is aviation speak for the tail, and excluding the moulded-in fin, there are three parts, one elevator that plugs into each side of the fin, and the rudder that completes the tail. You can therefore deflect the rudder without having to cut anything, adding a little individuality to your kit, as if the pilot has just left the aircraft, kicking the rudder to one side to swing into his dispersal position. The inner cannon barrels are moulded into the wings, and are joined by a pair of shorter outer barrels from the sprue, then you can build the radiators up under the wings, using the boxy fairing that fits into recesses under the wing, and has the radiator details moulded into it, adding the cooling flap to the rear cut-out. The cigar-shaped oil-cooler fairing is built from two halves, and it installs into a recess under the wings on the opposite side, feeding cooled oil back into the tank under the chin of the aircraft for its next trip round the system. You can pose your model in flight by plugging the main bays with two pegged inserts that have a representation of the wheels moulded into them, which you should paint a suitably rubbery colour. For wheels down, the struts are moulded as single parts, and have the wheel and captive bay door fitted to them, then they can be plugged into the bay roof. The tail wheel was fixed on early Spits, so either option requires this integrated wheel and strut to be inserted into the hole under the tail. The fuel tank can be fitted now if you wish, locating in the holes drilled earlier between the gear bays, and with a cut-out for the tropical filter, identifying it as only suitable for the second of the decal options. The fishtail exhausts are each moulded as a single part, and these slot into the openings in the sides of the cowling, to be joined by a choice of prop and spinner types. option one has three aggressively shaped blades trapped between a pointed spinner and back-plate, while option two has more traditional blade profiles, a shorter spinner and corresponding back-plate. A pitot probe is inserted into a hole under the port wing, and an aerial mast is added to the spine behind the cockpit, and you can use the included pilot figure to fill that area before you choose whether to model the canopy open or closed. For a closed canopy, there is a single moulding that covers the entire cockpit and this is why the canopy rails must be removed from the fuselage halves in anticipation. The open canopy is in three parts, gluing the windscreen and fixed rear portion into position, and then placing the opener slid back over the fixed rear, just short of the aerial mast. Markings There are two decal options included in this boxing, one in late-war grey/green camouflage with clipped wings and light grey undersides, the other in silver at the end of the war with a tropical filter under the chin. From the box you can build one of the following: Spitfire Mk.Vc ‘Central Railways Uruguayan Staff’ Presentation Aircraft, No.129 (Mysore) Sqn., RAF Ibsley, Hampshire, England, 31st May 1943 Spitfire Mk.Vc No.85 Sqn., RAAF, Western Australia, August 1945 – Pilot Flt. Sgt. R J Dunn Decals are by Cartograf, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin satin carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion The Spitfire is a great aircraft, and sells well for almost every model manufacturer. This kit is well-detailed for the scale, and includes some new decals that are a little different from the norm. It’s also pretty well-priced, and should be an easy build. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
    6 points
  24. Hi fellow modelers A very nice kit from Bandai. Very small but full of details. Have a nice day. Pierre
    6 points
  25. Well I wasn't happy with the fix so tried something different to look more like bracing wire. Oh and I put the wheels on as well. Finished the exhaust painting and fixed them to the engine after some masking and a matt coat over the camo parts. Then glued in position with a dry fit of the prop. The tyres need a little dirtying up and after scouring the destructions I find that I need to scratch the top aerial so I'll get that done and placed along with the tail post and the rudder control wires tonight. Then tomorrow I should be able to finish everything off as the sliding canopy has been painted and just needs a matt coat, the steps require some paint, as do the nav lights. Thanks for looking, More later, Cheers, Alistair
    6 points
  26. Later in the year? I'd better get in training. Tiddling ones wink should not be taken lightly, especially in a public place. I did wonder though, A roundabout on the Lincoln bypass? And I never did figure out why you made us dig trenches. Plus, when you said we would break for T, I didn't realise that the T stood for Turnip. A frappe no less. Even now I have trouble pronouncing the letter S. I'll get Her indoors to crochet me another flak jacket. The Regimental (emphasis on the mental) Goat ate my last one. Including the medal ribbons!
    6 points
  27. 🍿 Almost everything is said already, but not by everybody yet.
    6 points
  28. You will, of course, be required to act as umpire again Pete. That was a particularly vicious game, so much so that sharpening the edges of the metal tiddlywinks has been banned by the High Command after several nasty nicks were reported to the MO. The first leg, will be held at Martian Mansion (in low gravity) where the Martianess will do the honours, she will also require a cricket box, knee pads, flak jacket and crash helmet...Please make yourself available for the return, return match. later in the year. It'll be a doozy.
    6 points
  29. Just placed an order with Airfix for a number of items. Has become my tradition that I will place an order with Airfix just before Telford, for a few kits that I haven't managed to pick up during my yearly travels round the country, normally, it's literally just before the show, so it's delivered during the week after. However, just placed it now to save some hassle down the road. With the Hornby points scheme, should pay for a significant chunk of the next kit from them! On the way: 1 x 1/72 Heinkel He-111 P-2 1x 1/48 Hawker Sea Fury FB.11 1 x 1/48 De Havilland Vampire FB.5/FB.9 1 x 1/48 Hawker Hunter FGA.9/FR.10/GA.11 2 x 1/72 McDonnell Douglas Phantom FG.1/FGR.2 Nice tidy little pile to keep me going over the winter I think.
    6 points
  30. Question on an Irish radio phone-in quiz back in the early 1980s - Question - What was Hitler's first name? Answer - Heil
    6 points
  31. Today I applied the decals, not a lot, 14 in total and no dramas. I used Xtradecals for the SAAF markings and they appear to have settled down very nicely. Not fully dry when I took the photos, hopefully the blotchyness on the wing roundels will disappear when dry. Thanks for looking. AW
    6 points
  32. I'll remember to wear a cricket box and knee pads for that one. I still can't walk properly after that last game of tiddlywinks. (I think that's what he called it).
    6 points
  33. Since everyone here loves cats, I'll tell you my story. My wife and I love cats very much and would have had a cat for a long time, but we are allergic to animals. About 5 years ago, we built ourselves a country house. And wild cats live here. We began to feed them. Gradually they got used to it and began to consider our site their own. But they were not given in hand. We got to know everyone's character and gave everyone names. When winter came, I made them a house with warm bedding. We are forced not to let them into our house, but now we have cats, which we are very happy about. The most important one began to allow himself to be stroked. Three very cute kittens have recently appeared. We are happy with this gang!
    6 points
  34. Having been lurking on this forum for quite a few months now, and occasionally adding my own ramblings to other people's topics, I have finally worked up the courage to start a WiP of my own. My main interest is the RAF in WW2, at the moment particularly the aircraft of Bomber Command. So having had a short break from model making, of almost half a century , earlier this year I acquired these: This first post is a bit of a test run to see if my 20th century brain can cope with the 21st century technology of photo-sharing. If it all works I have a back catalogue of photos taken over the last six months or so and I'll be sorting and posting from that, which might give the illusion of amazingly rapid progress. Once I've caught up I'm sure it will become apparent that we should be using the geological time scale to measure my work rate! No proper sprue shots in this thread. I think we all know what they look like and by the time I got myself organised a lot of mine looked like this: That's enough of my waffle, let's hit Submit Topic and see what happens!
    5 points
  35. Finished this a couple of months ago, but a now rare ray of sunshine through the window prompted me to take a snap and post. Sorry for the quality of the photo. Not one of my skills. https://drive.google.com/file/d/18350bH1X5BPK8d4PjyrU3c2s3T2A-An4/view?usp=sharing Have to come clean and state it is not 100% OOB as I used some Xtradecals from Hannants. I am happy with some of the end result, but there are things that I really am not chuffed with at all. I managed to get most of the thing built cleanly which was helped by what is a well designed kit. I had closed up the fuselage with the idea of adding crew after I had painted them. Ironically, I was listening to a video describing how cramped this aircraft was when I realised I didn’t have a hope of putting the crew in place after the buttoning up the cabin. 😶 This may have been an ill wind, as they would have got in the way of the machine guns. Used a weak pin wash on panel lines trying to be subtle. I used ground up soft pastels to provide some gentle weathering and exhaust stains. Happy with that. Not so happy with my petrol leak stains achieved by using a pin wash over a matt varnish. Looking at pictures, some aircraft can be found in a right state, but the effect I achieved on the model looks overscale, if you know what I mean. It might work on a 1/35 tank, but I am not sure I like it on this. The other thing that bugged me and is not right are the small clear parts. The windows on top of the wing just look like chunky prisms. How do you get around that? Paint the sides and frames before gluing? The light in the wing leading edge is naff. But I had given up by then! What I should have done is installed these little itty-bitty clear parts, then taken them down to surface level, polished them and only then painted. But I didnt. Never mind. It is a nice looking aircraft which looks good from a safe distance. Thank you for looking. 🙂
    5 points
  36. The Buccaneer collection produced over many years. I don't think they need any further description but please ask if you would like any info:
    5 points
  37. I got caught taking a pee in the local swimming pool. The lifeguard yelled at me so loud, I nearly fell in.
    5 points
  38. Today I started the running rigging, yards, boom, gaff and sails. I'd made my gaff (the spar that spreads the top of the big sail (the spanker!) at the rear of the mast) and boom (ditto the lower edge of that sail) a long time ago. I used the photographs in the big A3 sized instruction book as you can see. In every case but this one, I took the written dimensions from the photo and measured the spars by ruler. In the case of the boom, the biggest one, I treated the photo like a plan, laid the dowel on it and marked the length straight off. This was unwise. The photograph is not to scale. 🙀 That was supposed to be 29cm! I spent valuable time making another boom from some spare dowel. It had to be thinned down a lot and will now need to be stained to match the gaff but at least this proves something I mentioned yesterday - if you mess something up on a wooden boat, you simply make another one. Irritating but not disastrous. I gave my boom an elegant taper, which the first one lacked, and left the butt end big enough that I could make the joint with the boom jaws a bit stronger with a rough tenon. This is all very simplified by the way and if I was working the model 100% I'd be incorporating reinforcing bands and some fancy woodwork. (And better tenons!) While the woodwork was setting, I turned to the staysail. This is the pre-sewn sail from AL and as you see, it's not bad at all - for a cloth sail. I wanted it in this state though, ready to haul but in a heap on the deck. The cloth sail is too stiff, thick and massive for that so I had to start experimenting with my aeromodeller's tissue paper. The cloth sail was my pattern. I folded the edges in to give me a hem and then stuck a second layer over the top using diluted Titebond wood glue. The result was soft and floppy but not wet. This was perfect as if it had been wet it would have damaged the deck and rigging and maybe stuck itself down irremovably. I moulded and folded it into shape with my fingers and clipped it to the stay in a few places, leaving the other corner lying loose on the deck. This orange colour version wasn't expected to be the final edition. I was just practicing. But with the clips removed, I'm thinking it might just do the job. Obviously I'll be painting it a different colour and since white seems unlikely to succeed, I may try the deep red-brown that we saw on some of @Iceman 29's photos of St Malo shipping. The plan is for the Vallejo paint to add a little more stiffness and durability to my tissue thin sail. The trick will be to apply it slowly enough that the tissue doesn't turn to pulp. Wish me luck.
    5 points
  39. Hello, this is my first post on this forum. I’m relatively new to adult modelling. I built Matchbox kits as a kid in the 80s but I’ve only take it up as a focused hobby over the last year or so. When I heard that Ukraine was receiving Sea Kings I thought it would make an interesting modelling subject. This is the old-tool Airfix 1/72 Sea King with HAR5 extras that came out around 2010 (so lots of putty). I’ve made a few adjustments based on observations of the Ukrainian HU5s. I wanted to support Ukrainian model companies in making the model – the landing gear is Reskit resin and the roundels are from a Foxbot Mi-24 set (all the other Ukrainian markings are painted). I had thought of scratch-building the step under the main cabin door but I’ve reached a point where I need to draw a line under the project! 😁 I noticed Xtrakit have Ukrainian markings available for the new 1/48 Airfix Sea King so a much sharper rendition than this can be accomplished. But this is my tribute!
    5 points
  40. Gidday, it seems above to be a very economical usage of parking space. Any space above a vehicle is usually wasted anyway. Regards, Jeff.
    5 points
  41. Hi folk's ,slowly easing back into the hobby after a few days away got the decal's on the undersides next a dark wash will be in order.
    5 points
  42. As promised, the contents of the box, both of the variants released so far contain the same parts, 3 sprues of light grey plastic, the clear parts, and masks. Only the box art, decals and instructions are different between the 2 boxings. The grey plastic has a very smooth surface, it reminds me of 3D printed parts, the raised rivets and details look really good. Recessed panel lines are very fine, there have been comments about the sprue attachment points being rather large, this is true but I just use some p/e cutters as the blades are finer. Clean up is easy as there are no ejector pin marks or seams to remove, in that respect it's better than a Tamiya or Hasegawa kit. The kit contains two canopies, one for the open position, the other for a closed canopy. Masks are supplied for both options and all the other clear parts. The decals are by Techmod, registration and colour density are good, those that have used them say they work fine. While the kit parts are all ok, I got these AM sets to improve some of the details, the 3D printed hollow exhausts and two different sets of gun barrels by ASK, the Yahu instrument panel looks superb, Arma supply a raised detail i/p and a nice decal but the Yahu set also includes other cockpit details, these and the Eduard 3D printed seat with steel seat belts are all designed for this kit.
    5 points
  43. Evening all! I have had a few sessions on these over the last few days, mostly just regluing the fuselage halves and ensuring all was fitted correctly. The DH9 fuselage took a few days to get glued properly as it was slightly warped and needed to be done in stages, but all eventually sorted out. The DH4 on the other hand needed a little more persuasion to get the nose fitted. I also added a sheet of .25mm card to the underside of the 4 to correct the profile - not far off but noticeable to me, and it also helped to hide the join. I'm still not sure that it went together properly as from certain angles it appears that the fuselage is slightly wider than the nose. Hopefully when the upper wing is on it will hide any possible error there! Filler was required on both of course, and it will take a primer coat later on to show any further work required there. Here's the nose of the 4 being fitted As you can see, the fit was not perfect! I think the fuselage was not quite tight at the bottom and has led to a slight lip, but hopefully the filler will sort it. Adding the underside sheet definitely helped! The 9 needed much less effort but still not perfect... I think I misread the plans and I need to fill most of the large rectangle that I cut out for the bombsight. It should only be a small square! The nose looks ok, and here is the extra engine detail as promised It's not much but definitely makes it look a little busier! Something still looks a little off with the rear cockpit. I think it may be a little warped or the curve is a little different on each side, but there is nothing I can do now. Hopefully I can adjust the rest of the fittings slightly to reduce the effect. Here're the 2 together The last job for today was adding the gunners' decking which I had prepared earlier (shades of Blue Peter!) I will let those dry properly before even attempting to trim them back. That's where they sit as of tonight. Next jobs will be trimming the gunners' areas and fitting the 4 nose piece. Then we can please @giemme and get a primer coat on! Thanks for looking in! Ian
    5 points
  44. Another busy weekend doing 1:1 stuff... but managed to give the decks a white base before a layer of burnt umber oil. Stuart
    5 points
  45. More done and, aside from a few small bits and pieces, we're just about ready for primer. Firstly, the BAM refuelling probe was added. The set conveniently has the large probe as a separate piece, to be fitted after painting. So the base was fitted, just a little PPP to blend in. Dry fit of the probe: Nicely done @arnobiz! Other than that, the cannon muzzle was added and the fit was perfect. Other than a few odds and ends, that's the airframe completed. Majority of sub assemblies are also ready for primer and paint: Exhausts also ready: Some paint, on some part or other, soon Dave
    5 points
  46. So, i dicided to redo the camo. I added choco brown stripes. However, it was still not what i was looking for.... so i went wintercamo. Never did that before so a great opportunity to try something new. I went with 2 layers of chipping fluid and then a coat of washable white camo from ammomig. After a bit of drying time i tapped all the surfaces with a damp stiff brush. And after a while this is how it turned out. I like it. Now i'll just let it dry and seal it in with satin varnish. Then we can start the chipping process.
    5 points
  47. I'll never forget my grandfather's last word to me before he kicked the bucket. He looked me in the eyes and said, "how far do you think I can kick this bucket?"
    5 points
  48. I moved the seats forward, this looks better to me. Perhaps I could have moved them a little more still. The duct valves (as they are called in a period cutaway drawing) have a lot of ejector pin detail incorporated into them. There is plastic enough present to bring a clean part out, although it takes a bit of work. The way the duct valves are created, four equal parts in open position, means they are set at full speed forwards and backwards at the same time. I think that was rarely the case, so I modified two of them to be placed in closed position. Like this the valves should be set at forward thrust. The instructions calls for them to be painted silver, but colour photos from the channel crossing shows them to be the same blue as the ducts. I resisted the temptation to draw the windows masks in AutoCAD and use the digital cutter. Old school manual labour did it this time. All parts pinned up for spraying paint. I have now sprayed white primer and most parts have also got their first colours.
    5 points
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