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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/25/2022 in all areas

  1. Hello all, this is the last of the three builds I’ve had on the go over the last few weeks (F-86D, TF-104G, Su-17). The aircraft was designed in the 1960’s to be an improvement on the earlier SU-7. In fact the early Su-17 was pretty well an Su-7 with swing wings fitted to it. The kit is short run and took quite a bit of cleaning up before the parts would fit well. It’s straight out of the box and is finished using my usual metallic paints of choice, Humbrol 27002 and 27003.with a sealing coat of satin Xtracolor varnish, Without further ado, here are some pics. Thanks for looking Pete
    30 points
  2. Argentine Skyhawk 3-A-305 returns to ARA Veinticinco de Mayo following a reconnaissance mission over the South Atlantic in 1982. The 1/72 Airfix Douglas A-4B/Q Skyhawk kit finished in the markings of the 3o Escuadrilla Aeronaval de Caza y Ataque. I added a replacement pilot, a couple of aerials, dropped the flaps and the tail hook, but otherwise it's out of the box. Mounted on a base from Coastal kits with an arrestor cable made from 0.4mm brass wire - Job done! The real aircraft was lost in an accident over BACE on 22 May 1986, but the pilot managed to eject safely. Thanks for looking. mike
    27 points
  3. Direct from the 'Big and British' Group Build I thought I woud share my finished HK Models Avro Lancaster. Almost straight from the box, this is a superbly engineered kit requiring little additional work. I modelled one engine exposed which required some work as athough the kit includes 4 merlins, the supporting engine bearers are not included, requiring a bit of scratch building to make them look realistic. Decals are from Xtradecal depicting a plane from 625 Sqn RAF Kelstern Lincs, April 1945 with 93 missions and 7 from "Op manna food to occupied Holland in 1945."=100 Ops. Enjoy. Interestingly the Lancaster is the smallest model in my 1/48 Avro collection! Build Thread here Colin
    17 points
  4. Hi, I just finished my TUI Germany 737-8 Max. Was definitely one of my quickest builds ever as I think I did the whole plane within 4 weeks from start to finish. Upon holidays in beautiful Madeira where we actually took Tuifly on our way towards there I saw a TUI 737-8 Max there and realised how cool it actually looks in that livery, IMO the livery is rather underrated. So I spontaneously had the idea of building one for the time after the holidays with a Max that was previously destined to be an Icelandair in my collection. Also had the beautiful TUI 757 of Ian Woodard as an inspiration that I once saw here. The decals are from DRAW decals for the livery and they are excellent, really opaque and the carrier film basically disappears once they are dried. Windows and details are from Authentic Airliners. All blues are painted. The light blue was kind of tricky, as all light blue I could find were rather too cyan, so I ended up mixing Mr. Hobby 45 with quite some red (to make it less cyan) and also some white. For the tail colour and winglets the same mix + even more white. The dark blue is Tamiya X-3. There's acutally a decal for the dark blue part, but it would be against my personal modelling values to not paint it and I guess it would never look really good as the area is too large and complex for a decal. I imagined the painting tricky with its curves and getting both sides look the same, but with a small "trick" (that others used before) it was much easier than I thought. I took a real photo that was mroe or less exactly side on. I then resized the shot to the same size as the model on Photoshop and printed it twice (mirrored it for the other side). I cut the light blue part out on paper and put it on the plane with masking tape. I used certain reference points above or under the doors and then drew lines with a pencil on both sides upon the white plane and then its about using flexible masking tape. For the dark blue part one already has this as a reference so this isnt hard anymore. Overall I am really satisfied. The kit is excellent and easy to build. The only downpoint is that a Max has 4 distinctive features compared to a normal 737NG. The larger engines, the different winglets, the APU-section that is 787 style AND the much higher front gear. Yet the Zvezda only has the normal front gear of 737 NG, where I feel that already on the rregula -700 or -800 kit it sits a bit too low (or likely the nose door gears are just too large). Personally I felt the front didnt look like a proper Max anymore. So I used some spares that I had to make it 2mm higher. But yeah with knowing that (I wasnt aware) one can easily make it higher, in the end some polysterene would also do the trick. For the pitots on front I used some Microdisin photoetched parts. Generally these sets arent really worth buying for me as I always end up only using veeery few parts of it, but I thought it was a cool feature. The finish was done done with Tamyia X-22 and then a pass of Mr Hobby's GX-112 to protect it from UV light (although of course other than for those photos it wont see the sun) and some Tamyia polishing compound. Enough said (likely even too much ;-), here are the photos. Thanks for looking, appreciate any comments. Julien
    16 points
  5. Good evening mates, here is my participant in this iconic GB - an experimental oldie Monogram - X-15 in 1/72 Cheers, S.
    12 points
  6. I'm calling this one done. It's the Revell boxing of the Hasegawa Phantom F-4M, or FGR.2, in 1/48th. It represents XV434 "J" when it flew with 23 Squadron in the mid 1970's. I have always admired the green/gray RAF camo and thought my first FGR should honor the "classic" RAF camo. Of course there are a few "oops" moments with the kit. No fault of Hasegawa, but some blame to Revell for the decals. A few of the stencils silvered. I used the kit wheels (incorrect for the RAF) but I hated the rubber tires that came with either this kit or the Hasegawa kit that I also have. I have one set of Aires RAF Phantom wheels that I plan to use on my next build. Please forgive me for using the American wheels. I don't get to uptight over wheels anyway. Also I waited to install the canopy sections until the very end because I wanted to add the Eduard photoetch canopy details. I should have at least put on the windscreen and center section so I could get them set and blended in before painting. There is a Work in Progress entry but it quickly moves down in the pages. I just don't know how to link it. If interested you can search for this: Phantom FGR.2 Hasevell 1/48 (britmodeller.com) If you have any questions please ask. The weapons load is what I read was typical for UK based air defense, 4x4 AIM-7/9 with 3 bags for extra range.
    12 points
  7. Hi all! I finally built my personal favorite car, BMW M635CSi from Fujimi. I made it using Lego mini figures, and filming picture by picture to achieve a stop motion movie. The build quality is not the best, I had lots of troubles with this kit. I think I need to stick to Tamiya more Have fun watching!
    11 points
  8. This F11F was entered in the Artwork Group Build with the sharkmouth decoration. This model was more or less built OOB, with a full rescribe and some extra detail added. Cheers, Luka
    10 points
  9. Hello all, Here is my recently completed 1/48 Kinetic Sea Harrier FRS.1, marked as XZ451 of 801 Naval Air Squadron (formally of 899 NAS), which was credited with downing an Argentine Dagger and Hercules during the Falklands conflict in 1982. The build thread is below. Extras used included Eduard etch, Eduard mask, Neomega ejection seat, Aires exhaust nozzles, Flightpath FOD inserts, Flightpath 1000lb bomb and Master pitot tube. The paint is mainly Tamiya acrylic (XF-77 for the Extra Dark Sea Grey) with the weathering done using a mixture of Flory wash, Abteilung oils and Tamiya sets. I added some details to the cannon pods along with adding the rudder strakes and correcting a few issues with the kit. As this was an 899 NAS machine up until 4th April 1982, it felt only right to display it with both squadron patches: There are better finished models out there, but I'm happy to finally have a SHAR in my collection. Thanks for looking and stay safe Dave
    10 points
  10. Renault UE 630 (f) tank destroyer. My last German conversion of a French Renault UE tractor so far. The model made by RPM is a combination of the chassis of the UE Renault and a model of a Soviet 45 mm anti-tank cannon, once manufactured by ICM. It used to be sold, I don't know if something like that really existed, or if it's a model author's invention. It is quite possible that something like this may have been created in the field workshops, but I have not seen any photos yet.
    10 points
  11. Here is one of my latest builds from the Academy F-86F Sabre, the QF-86E drone aircraft. As one of the founding members of the IPMS Target facilities SIG, I thought I should set cracking and build some aircraft that were appropriate to this SIG. After all, we will have a table to fill at Telford going forward! Other BM members include @Martian, @corsaircorp, @Corsairfoxfouruncle and @general melchett. Others always welcome! Apart from the internet, one of the most useful reference sources for the build was the excellent book by Duncan Curtis , Naval Fighters No 58 on the QF-86E/F/H/Sabre. These aircraft were full scale aerial targets converted from numerous different marks and origins of Sabre. Thanks to @Sabrejet for an excellent reference publication. The Academy kit is an F with the later ‘6-3’ root chord extension wing which was also fitted to the RCAF Canadair Sabre 5, from which this conversion originally came, becoming the QF-86E. So this was a reasonable choice for this model. All QF-86E drones seem to have been acquired for US Army use, and the serial I chose 23215 was eventually to meet a gruesome end from a US Army Patriot missile, during 1979! The main driver for choosing this aircraft was that amongst my stash of Microscale decals, I had sheet 72-288 with markings for two F-86’s and a QF-86 23215. The Academy kit went together well and seems to be reasonably good on surface detail. I usually use Alclad for NMF finishes like this but I tried out the AK Extreme metallics for the first time, and they seem to be very good. After airbrushing their gloss black primer, a combination of various colour metallic shades were airbrushed onto various different panels to try and achieve a realistic pure metallic look. The orange tail and wing marking were applied using MRP’s excellent International Orange Lacquer, over a white undercoat. MRP’s gloss varnish was applied prior to decals, and after decals, followed by some very light oil washes. A final coat of MRP’s semi-gloss varnish sealed everything in. These MRP varnishes have become one of my favourite solutions for finishing coats. Some initial pictures during construction And onto the completed model I daresay there will be future builds of a US Naval QF-86F and a USAF QF-86H. Comments/questions welcome Thanks for looking. T
    9 points
  12. So close to being ready for paint, so I spent today slowly adding final fittings here and there to both models. Wing landing light transparencies were glued in. I painted the slot black, and drilled a dimple that had a spot of silver paint applied to represent the lamp. They’ve since been sanded and polished up. I also made a pair of wireless aerial masts from brass wire. The tail wheel was glued in place under the tail. Another brass fabrication was made up for under the rear fuselage. I don’t know what it was, but I will assume it’s a pitot tube. Brass fabs replace PE parts where the latter will vulnerable to handling damage. The main undercarriage doors have been fitted, plus intakes and PE cooling gills. A feature common to both these aircraft is a part of the undercarriage that seems to have no obvious function. Bars are attached to the main wheel axle ends and sit aligned with the ground when the plane is sat on it. No idea what these features are, and because they’re very likely to be damaged they will be left until all the painting is done. The propellers were fitted with brass rod pins for a nice positive fit in the engines. Meanwhile, more PE gills on the T.V cowlings, plus exhausts and intakes. Another brass aerial mast. Since this photo, I decided to fit the nacelle plugs and attached the engines. I’m not bothering with extra detailing, so apologies if you’re expecting it. I really feel I need to push these models on and finish them. The engines need to be painted before I fit the cowlings, though I’m tempted to leave the latter off and paint them separately, which would mean I could paint the engines much later in the process. A pair of tiny clear lamps are provided for the landing lights, which I have glued in the wings. I’m going to try and use the resin clear parts for the covers. I still need to make the T.V tail wheel, which is an awkward assembly of two plastic parts and a PE parts, and still confuses me. I think it’ll be fitted after painting. Progress, then, has been made. The smell of rattlecan primer can’t be far away.
    9 points
  13. Hi all, I've decided to start my first build thread on here. This project was started some time ago and it didn't progress beyond the prep stage and modification of the fuselage halves to get the Aires cockpit and Reskit exhaust to fit. The aim with this model from the outset is to achieve a highly reflective natural metal finish. The kit and Aftermarket parts. The first thing I did was drill out all the nav lights on the fuselage and cemented plasticard disks from the back side. I will later paint them with metallics and fill them with UV resin mixed with clear colors followed by sanding and final polishing. The modified fuselage halves in order to accommodate the Aires resin tub. Test fit of the resin cockpit with the scratch built HUD lens temporarily in place. Reskit exhaust parts all cleaned up and ready for paint. Test fit of the exhaust. I decided to remove the top portion of the ejection seat rails and replace it with a more detailed part from Eduard brassin set. The painted cockpit with some additional Eduard PE parts. The cockpit glued in place and reinforced with a mixture of CA / dental acrylic powder. Thanks to Dr. Budzik, this mixture is now my go to method of filling and reinforcing joints. The top fuselage light was made using UV resin then sanded smooth and polished, the underside was then painted with metallics. Thanks for looking, Alex
    8 points
  14. "Mad City Modelers", my local club, is having a group build with the theme "The Year You Were Born". Having just finished my Red Baron F-104, I decided to stay with the century series and build a F-100 Super Sabre, which I'm claiming qualifies because it's first flight was on May 25, 1953. There are quite a few 1/72 kits of the "Hun", all of which have faults. Unsure which way to go, I posed the question to fellow BM'ers in this thread: https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235110863-help-me-decide-172-f-100d-—-trumpeter-italeri-or-other/ and received a lot of very helpful advice. My first inclination was to use the Trumpeter kit, but given the amount of work that is needed to correct its inaccuracies (poor nose shape, and too narrow in the fuselage around the cockpit) and the fact that I was under a deadline to finish (July 16), I decided instead to go with the old ESCI kit. ESCI's Hun is an excellent kit -- correct shape; fine, recessed panel lines, and generally nice detail. Key improvements I wanted to include were: Open the nose inlet and add an intake trunk; replace the kit's rudimentary cockpit with Aires resin; add an Aires afterburner can & engine nozzle; and drop the wing's leading edge flaps. For markings, I wanted to model an aircraft of the 79th Tactical Fighter Squadron (the "Tigers"), as my former father-in-law flew F-100s with the Tigers in the late-1950s (based at Woodbridge, England): My original plan was to use aftermarket items for the intake trunk and wing slats, namely, XMM's resin intake and Blackbird Models wings: However, I found that the nose of the XMM inlet is undersized, and Blackbird Models's slatted wings are simply resin copies of the Trumpeter kit's too-thin wings -- but less detailed -- plus an added center section cloned from the ESCI kit. Thus I took a different approach. I stole the intake trunk from Trumpeter's kit, and enlarged the front opening to match the correctly-sized ESCI inlet: I also removed Trumpeter's slatted wing sections and transplanted them to the ESCI wings: After that, it was simply a matter of cramming everything together! Those, plus adding the Aires resin cockpit and engine nozzle, were my major improvements to ESCI's F-100. For more details, my WIP can be found here: https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235111088-the-year-i-was-born-f-100d-super-sabre/ On to the photos! And, some detail shots: The F-100's underside is pretty busy, and the wheel bays in particular are ripe for super-detailing. I decided to forego that pleasure! I did, however, back-date ESCI's speed brake for a late-1950s aircraft. You might also be able to make out the retractable landing lights I added to either side of the nose gear bay: The nose probe / pitot tube is turned-brass from Master Models: The Aires cockpit is a must-have, but just barely fit after a lot of thinning of both the fuselage sides and the Aires tub: Here you can see the Trumpeter forward wing section and slats, grafted on to the ESCI wings. Also visible is some Eduard PE on the front of the wings, beneath the slats: I used Trumpeter's 275-gallon wing tanks, as the larger 335-gal tanks in the ESCI kit first entered service in the mid-1960s. too late for the aircraft I'm representing: The kit wheels are just "okay", and not nearly as nice as the Reskit wheels seen here. You can also see the brake lines that I added to the main gear: I used SMS Metallic paints to represent the silver lacquer finish of the actual aircraft, with a clear coat of Alclad Light Sheen. This was my first experience with SMS Metallics, and I'm now hooked on them. For the heat-stressed metal in the engine area, I used various shades of AK Interactive XTreme Metal enamel: Here's the business end of the Aires afterburner can & nozzle: Finally, I couldn't resist adding a few tiny little lights found on the actual aircraft: My "get off the stage" shots: Just sixteen days, start-to-finish! I'm amazed at how much I was able to get done in that short time . . . . and I'm unlikely to repeat that rate of building anytime soon.
    8 points
  15. Many years ago - as a kid - I built a Frog Marauder: As I didn’t have the paints required I had to do the French version - but in fact it was the SAAF Marauder I preferred. So 45 years later here it is: I used the Hasegawa B-26C kit with Eduard PE interior set and resin wheels. The serial and "L" are Frog decals, the insignias are from an Xtradecal sheet. All paints are Gunze, weathered with Tamiya weathering sets, a Karisma color silver pencil and AK washes.
    8 points
  16. And with a bit of paint added, and the motor working, I'm calling this done. More photos in the Gallery.
    8 points
  17. Well, somebody had to do it so I'm going to build the 1/72 Mustang so nobody else has to. 😀 While possibly not a classic in the usual sense it is a classic example of how sometimes things can go wrong. The banana shaped fuselage, along with the over sized wheel wells and drop tanks mean that most people will give it a wide berth and with good reason although on the plus side it does have some cockpit detail, which was unusual for a 1/72 kit in the early 60's. The early box art showing 'The Millie P' in its silver an red livery no doubt was responsible for a lot of sales to young modellers back in the day, it certainly caught my brother's eye as he built one back in the 70's. The later box art with a photo of the model didn't do it any favours though. Anyway, here's the kit. DSCF3308 by timothy jones, on Flickr DSCF3310 by timothy jones, on Flickr There's quite a bit of flash and some sink marks but nothing that can't be sorted. DSCF3309 by timothy jones, on Flickr I'll make a start on it soon as if I think about it for too long I might put myself off. Wish me luck. 😀
    7 points
  18. One of three proper nostalgia kits I bought 5 years ago, from Kingkit, specifically for the boxings. 50620304 by losethekibble, on Flickr One of the earliest models I ever had, I'd have been 5 or maybe 6, and that box art was seared into memory. I don't recall much about the kit, except it had engine detail... possibly I was just given the box and instructions? Anyway, it was a formative memory. I don't know if it even got much built, I was too young properly read the instructions, and no-one helped me to do this, I know around this point I had a Frog Vultee Vengeance, and I had filled the wheels with glue, which went soggy, and I had put them in fridge to try to cure that.... I think Vengeance was wanted purely because of the header card artwork... yes, i got that with this and the other one... I think it was about 8 before I actually could complete a kit unaided, but after that I built loads and loads... More later ...
    7 points
  19. Mmmmm mm....... Even today, it still looks like science fiction fantasy, doesn't it ⁉️⚠️😍 Plus, a venetian blind in the rear window..... Come ON 😎
    7 points
  20. No matter how we try to disguise it that is the natural level of most of us Martian, I gaze up at the feet of the masters in here and sigh, just a little bit...
    7 points
  21. This looks more like it. Something like this should have been on the PE sheet instead of something generic included separately. Maybe it was forgotten in the drawing process.
    7 points
  22. Sticky backed plastic and colouring between the lines.
    7 points
  23. Place holder for my build of Ray Collishaw’s Sopwith Triplane “Black Maria”. AW
    6 points
  24. This is my latest competion. I posted most of progress in the work in progress section. It has been finished as Wicked Wabbit, the mount of Maj. James C. Hare, 65th Fighter Squadron- " The Fighting Cocks", 57th Fighter group, Alto,Corsica, 1944. It was intended as my entry into the USAAF over Europe group build but over-ran just a tad. Built out of the box with tape seatbelts and decals from Rising Decals.
    6 points
  25. Johnny's wonderful wheels deserve decent paint jobs so I, being aware my hands wobble like jellified things, have been trying different methods of applying paint to them. This might do it This tape recorder from the days when I was chairman of our car club, used to keep records on meetings but a function better done these days by my phone, has been auditioned for the rotating gently job. A valve cap from a Schraeder valve cut and trimmed to allow the tyre to be cockpit glued to it before the rotating begun This does seem to be a viable idea but has a drawback in that the wheel isn't kept centred. More thought ongoing... The tyre is NATO black Vallejo and the rim is Vallejo silver with the hub centre painted in "C" flight's Prussian blue, I got one good one but the other was not as well centred over the valve cap. As I said, more thinking about it ensues.
    6 points
  26. Thanks to some timely intervention by the Authorities, and a plea by @JOCKNEY, the train to Revell GB has been reinstated and will depart shortly Let's start with the box and the sprues I have a few other GB builds to take care of before this one gains some traction ....... and @vppelt68 wants the Do 17 in that GB. I'll take a peek More soon(ish) /P
    6 points
  27. The final paint to the deck houses. And now fitted to the deck. I've also added the bollards and one of the tyres. I did wonder about how the tyres were attached, but my reference photo shows them in exactly this position. And still no contact from L’Arsenal about my order I placed on the 8th June. I don’t suppose anyone knows what’s going on with them ? Jon
    6 points
  28. The Mandolorian and Grogu Here is a new figure thet is finally finished. It's a big 3D print I don't know the scale but I guess it's aroung 1/6th. Painted with all kinds of colours and washes and filters. It is the first time I paint a figure this big and it took forever with layers upon layers to get the effects I wanted, I'm still a novis. We start with Mando... And Grogu And together...This is The Way Cheers!
    6 points
  29. The black tape has been applied. As was customary at Le Mans the headlight covers were taped off at the start of the race, to keep them protected and clean until the dark hours, in this case with transparent plastic and rather heavily applied black tape. I have however loosely based my taping on a photo after the finish, with the drivers posing on the car, where a somewhat finer line of tape was still present. I think that was the last thing, I'm probably done now.
    6 points
  30. Good evening everyone, Good progress today! Painting may be fully done by the weekend! Dryfitted the intake filter, canopy and landing gear and she's looking real fine if I do say so myself.
    6 points
  31. The Snoopy vs the Red Baron saga is actually related to plastic modelling. In 1965, one of Charles Schulz's sons had started to make models of Great War aircraft (I don't know if they were 1/48 scale Aurora or 1/72 scale Revell and Airfix, which would have been the main ones available at the time), and Schulz decided to have the latest part of Snoopy's fantasy life become his being a World War I flying ace starting with the strip published on Sunday 10 October 1965 (below). The idea took off over the next few months, and even resulted in a novelty hit single by a Florida band called The Royal Guardsmen which got to number 2 in the Billboard Hot 100 ("I'm A Believer" by the Monkees kept the number 1 slot) and made the top 10 in the UK, and number 1 in Australia and Canada, though the Australian version was censored - apparently Aussies shouldn't be allowed to hear the word "bloody" on the radio! Schulz and United Feature Syndicate (who distributed the Peanuts comic strip took legal action against the band and the royalties were awarded to UFS. Howevre, Schulz did allow the band to make several follow-up singles about Snoopy. A ska remake of i"Snoopy vs The Red Baron" by The Hotshots made the UK top 10 in 1973, which is where I first heard it, having been too young to be following the charts in early 1967.
    6 points
  32. The Wikipedia summary: The Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (CF-111, CL-90) is a modified version of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter supersonic fighter aircraft built in Canada by Canadair under licence. It was primarily used as a ground attack aircraft, despite being designed as an interceptor. It served with the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and later the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) until it was replaced by the McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet. I've wanted to build a Canadian Starfighter for a while now, but hadn't gotten around to it yet... so this GB is the perfect excuse to get into one! The polished aluminium with white wings and red tail will look absolutely stellar on my shelf if I can pull off a good finish. Until now I've been a strictly 1/72nd guy, mostly due to space constraints, but also because of my glacial building speed, and I don't really think my skills are up to par for larger models. However, I've written a loophole into my own rules: Canadian subjects can be 1/48th. 😁 (I've set a long-term goal to eventually build at least one of each major aircraft type that Canada flew in 48th. At the rate I build we may be retiring our F-35 fleet before I'm ever done.) Ubiquitous box shot: Of course I got some canopy masks from Eduard... but I also picked up their Löök set for the CF-104, which includes a 3D printed instrument panel and some nice PE parts for the cockpit. I'm eager to see how that goes together. It looks like it'll be a nice upgrade though. What the heck, I need to get another display cabinet from IKEA anyways...
    5 points
  33. 17 years ago I emailed Flankerman and asked if he had any pictures of the 1988 Su-27M/Su-35 prototype that was later left at Monino. He very kindly got back to me with a goldmine. The reference photos he sent me were a game changer as he had discovered the disruptive scheme was mirrored underneath and had a bundle of photos to illustrate it. I loved the Ferris like camouflage but also the new Su-27M nose profile with the traditional cropped fins as later Su-27Ms had the squared tips. I did all the hard work expected of an Academy and Sol conversion way back then and put it away; it sat in the box (with the occasional peeks) until this year. I've made a real effort to finish unfinished projects and clear the stash a bit. I'm pleased to say it's the last 1/48 Academy for me (7 built)! I'm now looking forward to all the newer companies much improved kits. Colors were mostly AKAN mixes, Neomega cockpit, Eduard etched details, DANmodels intake covers, Armory wheels and one of Haneto's (Fairy-Hobby) beautiful corrected canopies. The decals were from Begemot except for the stars which were hand made. I s I spent the last few days repairing my Su-37 Terminator so I could take a photo similar to this one of 711 and 701 together. i And finish with a hat trick.
    5 points
  34. The main reason for not progressing very well with my Spitfire Mk XIV is partly down to some Home DIY, but mostly the fun distraction that the Kittyhawk Voodoo has presented itself with. Got the kit a couple of months ago from mainland China and soon discovered that it needs quite a few corrections to make it an accurate representation. Luckily there is a great thread here on BM from@quangster and I have pretty much followed his methods for improvements albeit in a different order. So it is not going to be an extensive WIP, because pretty much all of the info is in @quangster ‘s thread below: Nevertheless, I’ll post some of the progress I am making and I first decided to tackle the most difficult modifications: The Exhaust or Burner Cans. Even these shorter ones need to be modified and additionally reduced in length: The intake lips were modified with the 4 unnumbered parts in the kit to represent the correct shape for the RF-101C following @quangster ‘s method. Enlarged the front external splitter plates and inserted new internal intake splitter plates which took multiple efforts to get the contours right. I completely removed and discarded the internal kit splitter plates. The intakes are the most difficult modification and it took me a few hours for a few days in a row to come up with an acceptable result. The lips were very easily damaged and had to be carefully repaired/filled more than once with sprue goo, Tamiya filler, car filler and CA glue. The intakes don’t actually come as separate parts. They were sawn off the wing and will be glued back later with panel and rivet detail scribed on the primer coat. Adding some vents/exhaust on the Starboard fuselage (some tidying up to do still) and removing the reflective strips which have been sanded away with primer applied for checking: Painted some of the jet engine parts: Planning on doing an Natural Metal Finish. Probably one of the top 2 schemes below: That’s all. Thanks for watching. Rgds, Rob
    5 points
  35. I have had a very bad record this year for GBs...I blame work...or any one of the million other things it seems I am meant to be doing at any one time other than modelling. Anyway I appreciate that I am late to the party but please may I join this this one: Picked up from Jadlam expressly for this GB. I mention this because when the package arrived it didn't have a kit in it just a tube of Revell Contacta glue. An obviously picking error. A quick email to the nice people at Jadlam and the kit arrived a few days later. I even got the keep the glue. Excellent customer service. I choose this kit because of (a) I like the German schemes, (b) it is a relatively modern kit and will hopefully go together fairly easily and (c) low parts count means I may get it finished!!! Schemes in the kit: And the sprues. Will be building OOB for mojo reasons. Cheers Dave
    5 points
  36. Decided on a 2nd GB entry as the first one will probably be done in a week. Managed to acquire a Revell Mini-ships 1/1200 USS Iowa, been a while since I did a ship.
    5 points
  37. Snoopy and his Sopwith Camel. Originally issued as Monogram 6779 (1970). Built from the Atlantis 2021 reissue.
    5 points
  38. Hi folk's,this kit is causing a few headache's,fuselage joined without issue you can just see a sliver of filler along the spine from the cockpit to the refueling insert.That was an easy fix and sanded nice and smooth but the insrt fit was rubbish you can just see a piece of evergreen strip I had to glue in to get the contours right.I'll fill it next session as there are a few gaps. No issues with the wheel bays which have some outstanding details molded in.I Chickened out of the open weapons bay. A dry run of the upper/lower wigs showed the need to shim out the corner section and the evergreen strip I have was spot on for the job it fits evenly once the gap is filled it should look fine.
    5 points
  39. i decided to ad a bit of light weathering, stage one done. A bit of dry brushing and pastel 'dust' to apply and then finish the detail painting prior to assembly.
    5 points
  40. After a morning's session, I've got this far A bit of kit history - Bob Reder of Monogram was the one to come up with the idea of Snoopy as a model kit. He contacted Charles Schulz and flew out to California to meet hi. Schulz wasn't bothered about royalties, but wanted to have full approval over the preliminary sketches, prototypes and package design. The Snoopy figure was carved by Chrisendo "Scotty" Forte, a Scot from an Italian family. The kit was publicised with a national TV advertising campaign, a cross-country air race between a replica Fokker triplane and a Nieuport 28 (as there wasn't a Sopwith Camel available) which ended with the pilots appearing dressed in WWI gear and as a dog on the TV show To Tell The Truth (on which the panel couldn't guess what they had been doing) and print adverts, which appeared in the Marvel comics published in June 1970 (these ones, Enzo) and is reproduced below.
    5 points
  41. Good morning everyone, thanks for the responses. Let's have a look at what I got in the box. Here is the body, moulded in white plastic. Black plastic parts. The previous owner of the kit tried to use some felt for the carpet, I've got some other felt that I will probably use instead. The front part of the chassis has been built up. Chrome bits. The engine has also been part assembled by the previous owner. Tyres and some rather tired decals, I hope that the dials and Aston Martin badges are still usable, although I'm sure there are options if they aren't. The clear parts aren't bad on the whole, although the rear quarter windows are a bit thick and don't fit the body very well. I may cut replacements out of clear plastic. The windscreen is a bit distorted, but I hope it can be gently reshaped. Test fitting suggests that it is possible to persuade the windscreen to fit the frame. Talking of test fitting, this is the boot lid, which seems to fit quite well. The arrangement for hinging the boot isn't very satisfactory and I'm tempted to cement it into place. It's a bit of a shame as you get some nice luggage for the boot, but I don't want the boot lid falling off all the time. The bonnet is altogether less satisfactory, being too small for the opening and not sitting flush with the rest of the bodywork. I have taken steps to fix this. You can also see a bit of a moulding defect in the headlamp surround, which will need filling. A bit of microstrip on the underside of the bonnet provided the necessary thickness to lift the panel to the level of the surrounding bodywork and increased the width of the bonnet to better fill the hole. More microstrip was added on top, to eliminate the step around the sides of the bonnet and the whole thing was then sanded to achieve a better fit. There's still a little work to do on the leading edge of the bonnet, but it's greatly improved over the original fit. Talking of work, these sink marks will probably haunt me, I'll fill them with styrene but I know it's going to take a lot of effort to eliminate them. There are a few slight mould lines, that I've sanded away. Another issue is that the instructions show the front and rear valance panels going on after the chassis is installed in the body. This isn't an issue at the front, where the bumper completely hides the join, but at the back this would leave a visible join in the rear wing. My plan is to glue the valances on and get a seamless fit on the rear valance, then assemble the chassis into the body in two parts, much as I did with the Maserati. If necessary, I'll remove the front valance to fit the chassis as the join will be less noticeable.
    5 points
  42. Afternoon. Thought I’d do a cheeky afternoon update. 🤗 Firstly a test of strength. Those inner struts are soo well thought out. Bravo Airfix. 👏👏 A few spots of glue the outer struts and tape. This time not close to decal land. A few hours later in this heat it had cured. Such a lovely looking thing I couldn’t resist a glamour shot. 🍑 The wheels for both have now been weathered and sealed. Let the madness begin! 🧵🪢 Thanks for popping in. most of the family are away this weekend so you never know what might happen. 🤩 Take care and as always. Happy modelling. Johnny
    5 points
  43. Here are the parts for this kit: For some reason there are two battery holders. I'll see which one an AA cell fits best. There's a fair bit of flash on the yellow sprue, but it should clean up pretty easily. The stickers and motorisation parts: And the instructions. I don't think these were drawn by Charles M Schulz, though the first page appears to have been swiped from his comics:
    5 points
  44. Here is my representation of HMS Courageous, a Churchill Class submarine of the Royal Navy using the recently released Mikro Mir kit of HMS Conqueror in 1/350. Built half OOB as I like the waterline look of my maritime. The only extra work done was adding the side vents and correcting the white draught marks to red, oh and adding an extra set of draught marks to the forward edge of the rudder. Depicting the boat as 'crossing the line' in 1981(ish). Short build log here: Stuart
    4 points
  45. I have been experimenting with different types of methods lately. This time is with mud. Yep! Good old natural mud. I used mud collected from a neighboring farmer's dirt road. Really fine dirt, I must add. All I did in this diorama, was add PVA glue, and a little water, and Voila! The muddy puddles you see were done using a mixture of Liquitex gloss medium & varnish, and their Transparent Raw Sienna ink for the muddy look. I also tried a little mixture of MIG wet effects and Liquitex Raw Sienna. I think the end result looks pretty convincing. I am still fine tuning the surrounding areas by doing some dry-brushing on the mud, to bring out the different texture. But so far, it appeals to me. The model itself is from AMT 350 Pay hauler. I had this kit for a while and did not know what to do with it. The big bucket was cut down to fit. So there is no chassi just the big bucket and front end of the pay hauler. I did much on the interior with some additions and some minor scratch built parts. This scenes inspiration was taken from many photos of collapse mines or sink holes that dumpers and machines alike, have fallen victims. As always, I like to always do some different and try to go one-step further.
    4 points
  46. I can also see the bottom of a code in that picture. My thinking says maybe the codes were allocated in sequence, ascending so JW-T for DR944 then JW-U for DR945, but then as you perceive, it does look more like the bottom of a V. If any logic were applied back then, one would think that the codes might have been in close sequence, so T and U or V and U. Not much help, just ideas from my somewhat old brain! T
    4 points
  47. You can do the train, as long as the original release was prior to 1989 then thats all the matters.
    4 points
  48. Sprue shots. Whoops doubled a photo so will need to fix that. Dennis Fixed here us the last sprue shot.
    4 points
  49. Primed and main wings painted white, use Humbrol gloss white.
    4 points
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