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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/30/2021 in all areas

  1. As the title states, this is my interpretation of a 660 Sqn Westland Scout based in Sek Kong circa 1982'ish. I normally don't do RFI's but this one turned out to be a lot better than I expected, and I thought I could show what can be achieved with a fairly basic kit if you add enough determination and enough swear words link to build thread here... For those of you familiar with the Fujimi kit, for a start, it's a Wasp, and not a Scout so I knew I had to make a few adjustments when I (very naively) started the build some years ago. Luckily for me, in between starting the build and then getting back to it after a prolonged break, someone had invented 3D printing - so I invested in a 3D printer (Elegoo) and the rest as they say, is history. This allowed me to add some detail that I would never have been able to do if left purely to scratchbuilding. When all's said and done, I ended up printing: Nimbus Engine Main Rotor Gearbox Rotor head and shaft Rotor Blades Small fuselage step Blower fan Window Rubbers (a bit too large, but I have fat fingers) Seats Instrument panel and center console Undercarriage posts Wheels I also added a reasonable amount of scratch built detail such as the plumbing around the Nimbus engine, the undercarriage, tail pylon, tail skid, and various other odds and sods. A special thanks goes out to Bill ( @perdu ) who jumped in to the rescue when some of the kit decals disintegrated, and provided a lifesaver for me, Enough rambling - here's what I ended up with... a rather heavily modified Fujimi based Westland Scout of 660 Sqn AAC from the early 80's and a random assortment of some in-progress shots Thanks all!
    38 points
  2. Hi folks! Another one from the past,the P-47 Razorback of David Schilling when with the 62 nd FS. The excellent Tamiya kit with some goodies, Bronze green cockpit color, Aeromaster decals. One of my first attempt at riveting. DSC_0002 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0003 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0004 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0005 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0006 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0007 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0008 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0009 by jean Barby, sur Flickr
    35 points
  3. Hi folks, this my recent build of the Eduard kit, i.e. reboxed Revell kit with some accessories. While the etched and resin stuff is great, the Revell molds seems to remember the WII and these were of poor quality indeed with many scratches, flash etc., not speaking about triste state of the cleat parts. Therefore my enthusiasm quickly evaporated and I was glad I eventually found enough determination to get the kit off my table. Kit built OOB, only the AIM-9L were replaced with Reskit items, the RBF are Eduard etched and the "FODs" were glued from a paper tissue. Cheers Libor
    31 points
  4. Hello mates, here my last build. Not much to say: not a perfect kit, but excellent, the one and only real windscreen of a B. Cheers, Tom
    26 points
  5. Surely one of the lesser known German aircraft, produced in only 7 examples in 1943-44, it was produced by Huma Modell in 1/72 scale in the 90s, with an overall satisfactory result. A few years ago, thanks to the collaboration of a German friend who provided me with new documentation, I decided to build it. The cockpit required some details, while for the internal surfaces of the semi-fuselages I had to proceed with the construction of the entire structure from scratch. Wings and tail planes have undergone less important changes. The aircraft shown is the first prototype, practically the only one of which there are usable images, during the towing tests in Erfurt-Nord in March 1944. The model is painted in classic 70/71/65 (mix of Humbrol Enamels); the letters of the code are 'printed at home', as those in the kit are slightly incorrect and in any case of poor quality; finally crosses and swastikas come from various sheets. Hope you like. Thanks for viewing Criticisms and suggestions welcome. Giampiero Piva
    20 points
  6. I built this one in a record time.Under a week.I wanted something relaxing after the resin c-140 I built a while ago.I only added the seatbelts and a gunsight.The rest is OOB including the academy decals.I used gunze paints and the varnishes are from ak and vallejo.Enjoy the photos
    20 points
  7. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 Special Hobby A-20 Boston with Red Stars. The model was painted with Mr.Hobby acrylics. Photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. Thanks to @Kjetil Åkra, @dogsbody, @DLinevitch for their help in research. This kit was first released in 2007 under the MPM brand. Special Hobby added specific parts for the VVS Version with UTK turret (plastic, resin and etch). Unfortunately the turret transparencies are not as clear as the cockpit glazing, and they don't fit well. The oversized defense gun was replaced with a metal item from Mini World. I scratch-built the life raft in the cockpit with paper tissue. The bomb bay was cut open and loaded with Soviet bombs (from a Tamiya Il-2). Photo-etch from Eduard. Previous owner's markings (RAF?) overpainted. This was a pretty challenging build with poor fit throughout. I'd only recommed this kit to seasoned and very patient modellers. Thank you for your interest, best greetings from Vienna! Roman
    18 points
  8. MPM Kit started some time ago and dropped when Airfix released its new tool Blenheim Mk.IV. I finally decided to finish it. Typical short run, the kit is not an easy assembly. Especially the adjustment of the four transparent nose pieces, together with all the interior parts, was a nightmare. Several other parts had to be fixed or built. Still, the final result has several errors that I couldn't (or chose not to) correct. Looking back, although I'm reasonably satisfied with the result, I believe I should have bought the new Airfix. I would have gotten a better result with much less effort. The model represents a Bristol Blenheim Mk.IV from the GRB 1 "Lorraine", FAFL, based in Syria in 1941. The markings have been painted, except for the serial number and tactical number.
    17 points
  9. Hopefully it's going to look a little bit better this time around Adrian - it's all finished (I think) thanks Wlad Sorry Pete. Eye drops in the post. Travel update to follow thanks Roger she is now Ian - there, I mean. and the mail sped, and God was happy, and so was hendie I'm a fully paid up member of the Ratatat club school of modeling. (Recruits Any Tool, Any Technology, Any Time) A funny thing happened on the way to the forum. I finished the build yesterday, took a bunch of photos, uploaded them to postimage and proceeded to write this I think it's all over now post. Then as I was adding images, adding comments etc. I got towards the end of the post and added a shot showing the cockpit interior and... dammit no cyclic lever So, delete the images, grab the model - I was just about to put it in the cabinet - and head back downstairs to add the cyclic. Bummer. The forum software autosaved some of the post so at least that saves me trying to remember what I was rattling on about yesterday. Here goes for the last time (hopefully) Things were dangerously close to calling this a wrap so it was given the once over (again) and double checking of references to try and spot was was missing. Of course I immediately spotted another one of those things I hate making - windscreen wipers. Unfortunately I couldn't really find anything else to do instead so I couldn't put the job off any longer. I had in my stash some PE wipers that I got for my DB5 build years ago and rushed to look them out.... too big! Nothing for it then but to make them the old fashioned way. Some .01" x .03" strip, plus another bit of same, plus a piece of 0.01" rod, add in some eye strain and some cursory cursing and I ended up with a pair of these - that's it resting there on a MkI digit which were then painted black and stuck on the front end with some cyano. There's also a couple of aerials in the making in that shot. I'm glad that's over - those wipers weren't as easy as they look y'know. Neither was sticking them on. Making them is one thing but sticking them on was rather nerve racking. With such a small contact area, I had no option but to go for cyano again, and try my best to stop the hands shaking as I slowly moved them into position. Success! One other (main) thing that was preventing me from finishing this build was the lack of the DANGER signs for the tail pylon. If you remember a few posts back, oor Bill of this parish bravely stepped up and took one for the team - and those decals arrived yesterday evening. Yippee! The decals were perfect and I got those on pronto, glossed and flatted and that allowed me to get on with building up the remainder of the tail. Stainless wire used for the stays as usual. With the rotor head and blades painted, all that was left was to give them a protective clear and flat coat, then I remembered in time to paint on the ID colors for each of the rotors - now all I have to do is remember to add the correct blade to the appropriate pitch change rod. like so... A few more aerials were added, the tail rotor pushed on and I think we can call this finished - if anyone spots anything else obvious that I've missed, please let me know I think I'm done. I do. I really think I'm done on this build. In the end, I have to say I really enjoyed the final stages. Once I got past all the main modifications to the shape and got some color on it, I could then concentrate on the greeblification which is the part I enjoy the most. The transmission deck was challenging but certainly enjoyable as it was one of those areas where you could see everything coming together and adding character to the build. Anyhoos... enough said - here's a bunch of photos of the finished SCOUT (with cyclic) and one last parting shot of the pièce de résistance thanks for hanging in there while this prolonged build was enacted in fits and starts with the occasional sabbatical thrown in for good measure. For those that have contacted me re: printed parts. I have most of the parts printed but my printer screen started dying a few days ago. Another screen is on order and should be here this week, so I'll get that changed out and the remainder of the parts printed - I'll be in touch as soon as they're ready.
    15 points
  10. Hello all Been trying to finish off some abandoned projects and long term shelf of doom residents, this Tornado being one of them where it just needed some final details to complete. I used the newish Airfix starter kit boxing but to be honest if this was a kit that was picked up by a beginner it may be the last one they ever build! I do wish Airfix would check which models are being used in the starter kit range as it may put new folks off modelling altogether....and this one isn't particularly cheap either. The isn't one of Airfix's best, with lineage going back probably to the 1980s? Raised panel lines and terrible fit of some of the parts, the upper and lower fuselage being absolutely horrendous with warping and mismatched joins, and the upper fuselage being 2 or 3mm wider than the lower half! Much filling and sanding later and I think I have something that just about resembles an F.3. Paints were Gunze Aqueous, decals a mix of modeldecal and the spares box. Final matt varnish from Vallejo with some weathering with pastels to finish. Hope you like...comments much appreciated. Thanks for looking. The new kid on the block (well...back in the 1980s)
    14 points
  11. I just recently joined but I’ve got 2 builds to share which I completed at basically the same time. These are my first 2 attempts to make models with more advanced techniques than basic brush painting. First up was the Do335. I have wanted to make this model for some time and I started with high hopes that I could achieve an airbrushed look with brush painting. Well, for me it was a big fail. I used Mission Models paints and the subsequent coats tended to pull up the base coats (they airbrush great though). In addition, when I tried to mask off it pulled up big chunks of paint. I hadn’t bothered to prime the model so this frustration ended up with me buying an airbrush. I removed all the paint and sanded the model which made the paint stick well enough to prevent loss of big sections, so I was able to successfully mask and paint the camo. I still made lots of mistakes that required touch ups, but overall I was pleased. I sealed with future and then had a nightmare with the decals. The water discolored the future and the setting solution removed the future if left on. This led me to try and put them on as rapidly as possible and some are crooked, some have silvering, and I still needed further touch-ups. With all the frustrations, I decided to put this model down and started on the FW-190 as a test mule for the weathering and dull-coat application. In the end I’m happy with the results. The kit has significant fitment issues which I was able to reasonably deal with but it’s what you would expect from a 1974 mold. Second started, but finished first was the FW-190. This is an even older mold (60’s vintage) with the raised rivet detail. I had to scratch a rudimentary gear well and instrument panel as there were none. Forgive the seams/panel gaps because these weren’t a major concern. I only addressed the worst areas because I didn’t want to sand and scribe the whole thing. The main focus was to practice on a cheap kit that I wasn’t so invested in. I used primer so my paint issues were reduced to about nil. This was my first attempt at a free-hand camo pattern which I’m quite pleased with. I made the future coat thicker and figured out how to apply the decals with less drama, and I am super pleased with how well they set down. My first attempts at weathering went pretty well, and I was happy I could get as much panel line detail on with the oil wash as I did.
    14 points
  12. Hi, I want to share a few photos of my last finished build. 1/72 Soviet T-28 Medium tank in winter camouflage. I tried to reproduce the harsh soviet winter condition on my vehicloe, hope You like it.
    12 points
  13. Hi guys, I just finished this longer than usual project. Is the fantastic Fw190 A-4 Eduard 1/48th kit with some aftermarket details. Eduard's Advanced Brassin set which includes: resin engine & fuselage guns, resin wingroot gunbays, resin propeller and PE upgrade set. Master Models gun barrels, HGW Models fabric German fighter seatbelts and decals, Quinta Studio 3D decals cockpit set, and Aires resin inspection panel on the vertical stabilizer. For the colour scheme I wanted to do something different to the usual ones that we see in the Fw190 so I've opted for this very attractive North African camouflage. It was flown by Erich Rudorffer in Tunisia in 1943 Considered by many to be the Luftwaffe’s greatest all-round fighter ace of World War Two, Erich Rudorffer served on every major front, flew all of the classic German fighters and was renowned for his ability to shoot down multiple aircraft in succession. Beginning his campaign with JG2 during the Battle of France, Rudorffer then served in the Battle of Britain alongside top aces such as Helmut Wick and Gunther Seeger. Flying the Bf109E, his aerial victories soon mounted, and he continued to joust with the RAF during the ’Non-stop’ offences of 1941. By the time of the ill-fated Dieppe Raid in 1942, Rudorffer scored his 44th and 45th victories, both Spitfires. His Gruppe was then relocated to northern Africa where the war was going badly for the Axis forces. Now flying the heavily-armed Fw190, he began to demonstrate his skill at downing a number of aircraft on a single sortie. On the 9th February 1943 he claimed eight British aircraft and a short time later scored multiple victories over US-flown fighters. By June of the same year, Erich had moved to the brutal Eastern Front, assuming command of II/JG54, the famous ‘Green Hearts’, and continued to display his remarkable ability. On the 6th November 1943, he tangled with a large force of Soviet aircraft and shot down no fewer than thirteen of them, a record for a single mission. By this time Rudorffer had already been awarded the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves and in January 1945 ‘Swords’ were awarded to this decoration after achieving his 212th victory. Shortly after, he was given the command of I/JG7, flying the potent Me262 jet fighter in the defence of Germany. Despite the dreadful war situation, lack of fuel, marauding Allied fighters over the jet airfields and heavily outnumbered in the air, he managed to shoot down a further twelve aircraft with the Me262. By the war’s end, Erich Rudorffer had flown more than 1000 sorties, scored 224 victories and was the seventh-highest Ace in the history of aerial combat. He died at the age of 98, on the 8 of April 2016. Fw 190A4 6.JG2 Yellow 1 Erich Rudorffer, Tunisia 1943 cheers and thanks for looking. Jorge
    12 points
  14. This is my latest finished build and another classic kit from Tamiya. Although this kit is very basic in terms of detail I still think it builds up into a smashing 935 when finished. The only issue I had during the build was with the decals which for some unknown reason just didn't want to come off the backing paper without a fight. In the end I resorted to dipping them in boiling water which did the trick and once free from the backing paper they went down really well although in some areas a lot of micro sol was required. The kit was primed in mr surfacer 1500 grey and the basecoat white was the old faithful Tamiya X2 thinned with levelling thinner. The gloss coat was zero paints 2K clear and for the tyre lettering I used a Dunlop stencil. Unusually for me i decided to add the driver figure that comes in the box this was a side project whilst I was waiting for the clear coat to dry. Here's a few pic's of the finished build plus a couple of the man behind the wheel 🙂 So that's it for now time to start planning for my next build which I think could be a bit of a challenge 🤔. Thanks for looking back soon 🙂👍
    11 points
  15. Built this last year during quarantine. First F1 model I had built in about 15 years. This kit had been sitting in in a box in the garage since before my first child was born. I had always wanted to complete this kit just as I have. I did not complete the engine, and glued the cowling onto the kit. A true curbside kit for sure. There are a couple spots I'm not happy with but overall I'm pretty happy with it. The part that bugs me the most is that I completely flubbed the nose stripe. I didn't notice it until assembly I did a horrible masking job and didn't paint far enough back towards the mirrors. Most wont notice but you know damn well that will bug me. Paint turned out good, decals went on well, and it looks like a real race car. Haha. Thanks for looking.
    11 points
  16. Thanks Fellas One of the joys of modelling for me is to listen to Radio 4 or in more recent years podcasts. Here's a shout-out to one that has completly grabbed my attention and it's a big thanks to Stanley one of my oldest mates for pointing me in it's direction The Rest is History Historians Dominic Sandbrook and Tom Holland riff away - it's addictive. ( Tom Holland is the Classical historian, his brother James is the WW2 expert) You heard it here first!!! So on with the modelling Primer. I learnt on the Spruecutter's Union Podcast the other day that Mig Ammo "One Shot" is in fact Stynylrez It's good whatever it is This is a tip I picked up from @beefy66. Using primer to form plate (panel) lines. The Starling hull is smooth so the attempt will be to emulate the plate lines that this profile highlights And whilst that's drying - work continued with the bridge The Wind deflector on the Flying bridge was done with 0.3 x0.5mm Plastruct - the edges being cut at an angle using the Cutting mat template. spare railings were cut and shaped. poole was unusual in that she seems to have had railing around nearly the whole of the aft roof And using another tip from the Beefster ( @beefy66) He's a Grand lad Spray dodgers are made using cigarette papers soaked in a very diluted PVA solution (use the Fine papers) I was pleased to see on Fbook that Atlantic Models are close to releasing their Hunt class type 2 - Stroll on HMS Avonvale Thanks for looking Rob
    11 points
  17. For the 40th anniversary of the first shuttle flight, decided to build a 1/72 Monogram shuttle stack. I favour the Revell shuttle so purchased the newly re-release 40th anniversary kit. Surprisingly the decal sheet does not include markings to build a shuttle pre- 1988 as it does not include any of the NASA worm logos or the USA for the starboard wing Columbia sported from 1981 to 1983. Luckily I had spares, but a serious omission for a kit branded as being 40th anniversary of Columbia. Strangely the Revell 1/144 full stack kit DOES include these. Had a 1/48 Trumpeter T-38 in the attic so decided to combine the two for landing photos with the chase planes. Here are a selection of the effects photo (Edwards AFB rendered in Terragen), the others can be viewed here; https://www.flickr.com/photos/spacemodelsphotography/albums/72157667646196676 Keith
    10 points
  18. Hello mates, uff, this took some time... Cheers, Tom
    10 points
  19. Hi guys! Forgive me for not writing anything for a while. I haven't taken a break from my Berwick at all, nor have I been busy with other projects. On the contrary - I have been very busy. I'll report back item by item: 1. These are the cranes that turned out. It's a shame, the way manufacturers usually simplify them! 2. The big launches. We have even had a discussion about a motor one with a deckhouse. I agree with @Dave Swindell and @Ships doc who have written that the look of the dinghy is questionable. but I have long ago made a deckhouse for this barge in the course of testing a new soldering iron and really wanted to use it. As a result, on the starboard side will be such a non-skid dinghy 3. All sorts of trivia and the latest generation of homemade sailors. 4. As the cherry on the cake - 8 barrel pom-poms. Used parts from kit, syringe needles, copper wire, foil and flywheels 1.2mm from our favourite NorthStar Models as ... gunsights All good things come to an end sometime. I finished with finalizing parts for Berwick. All that remains is to paint the parts of this post, put them in place, pull the remaining rigging and raise the flags on the halyards. The work is already well under way Anyway, expect my Berwick in RFI by Christmas. Thanks to everyone who reads me 💜💜💜
    10 points
  20. This is my 1st post on the in progress forum. Unfortunately the kit is almost at an end. I am waiting on a delivery of pigments and other weathering products so I can add dirt and dust to the hull before I mount the tracks. The tracks will be weathered before they go on as well. I have used the plastic AFV CLUB tracks as this build will be mounted to a diorama and didn't want to waste my metal tracks. I am just starting to play around with some figures for the diorama.
    9 points
  21. Meant as a quickie beside my B-52 these two kits costs me more effort than planned. The Special Hobby kit in 1/72 scale shows a lot of fit issues and so a lot of filling, sanding and rescriping was necessary. The little scene shows two training aircrafts from 70° Stormo in Latina, south of Rome. The two kits are almost oob built , only the flaps were lowered and some static dischargers and antennas were added. Regards Daniel
    9 points
  22. Well - I think I'm done. I do. I really think I'm done on this build. ( I don’t think that’s original - I might have read it somewhere recently ) Quick few photo’s (p’raps not the best iPhone photography ever). I wasn’t fussed about building (another) Spitfire - but I’ve grown quite fond of this one. She gave me an opportunity to play with chipping/oil effects. Tried to be restrained and stick to a look that I could justify from photo’s of the 1:1. I confess that the finish on the exhausts and the prop blades are amongst my favourite bits. Little things - little minds etc. etc. I mustn’t look to closely or I’ll start fiddling with it again….
    9 points
  23. English Electric Deltic, this kit the DP1 prototype locomotive, that led to the mighty Class 55 Deltic - the most powerful British locomotive of its time. This prototype was displayed at the Science Museum for about 30 years, and is currently at the National Rail Museum, Shildon. The engines differ slightly from those in production models, and are damaged, so this locomotive will never run under her own power again. So what is a Deltic all about? Well, a unique configuration with 3 crankshafts in a triangular formation, and opposing pistons giving compression. Multiples of 6 pistons. No valves or cylinder-heads, this engine relies on ports for its intake and exhausting, and is a two-stroke. This locomotive has 2 engines, each 18 cylinders, so 36 pistons, and 88.3 litres giving 1,650hp. A remarkably compact package totalling 3,300hp - the most powerful locomotive of its time, the first able to cruise at 100mph. Light as well, 100 tons - the lightest of its size. This engine has to be seen and heard to be believed - with one crankshaft rotating in opposite direction to the other two. There are more firing strokes per rotation - giving the Deltic a very different and powerful humm. Then there's the smoke - lots of it. The exhaust system gets a liberal coating of oil at tick-over, so is usually switched off, rather than idle for more than 20 minutes. Over 20 minutes, and a huge oil slick can be chucked out of the exhaust and down the side as it powers up. I've got photos of this delightful behaviour on heritage railways. In service, with being run hotter and under more pressure, there are stories of exhaust fires, and upward firing flame throwers - no wonder they're extinct now! The engines drive a generator, which provides power for traction motors on each axle. I missed Deltics on the main-line, but have been pulled by two at heritage railways - where they are overpowered, routinely operating in single engine mode. So to the kit, first issued by Rosebud Kitmaster, sometime in the early 1960s. At some time it was transferred to Airfix, who lost track of it - possibly in a fire. Airfix never issued this kit. All Airfix's railway moulds were later sold to Dapol. This one was amongst that batch, and labelled 0-4-2. On investigation the Deltic was rediscovered, and re-issued by Dapol. With an explanation that the cab glazing was not found, and a recommendation to use acetate sheet for the windows. Another thing about Dapol kits. They're made from recycled plastic. There's advice on the instructions that parts may be warped or distorted (something I found with my Battle of Britain Class build.), and to return the whole kit to the retailer - who has a contract with Dapol to replace it. This is on a whole kit basis - with no such service for individual parts. And did I ever realise the significance of that! - when I noticed part of the windscreen surround broken off and missing, AFTER I'd started the painting process! Fortunately, a check of the bag revealed most of the missing surround - leaving a gap which I was able to fill with some plastic sheet. Tim's verdict: A privilege to have built this iconic locomotive. It really looks the part, and of very good quality. Now question from a diesel enthusiast: why didn't Rosebud Kitmaster make models of all the other contemporary diesel locos? First 2 photos, pre weathering Detail picked out with gel-pens. Then, very light weathering by airbrush. Slight rust from brakes over the running gear. Diesel muck over the roof.
    8 points
  24. I’m calling this finished! The yellow was difficult to work with, but the kit itself was a decent fit, especially considering it’s resin. I was surprised to read that over 1,000 of these were built between 1940 and 1943, mostly for use in the paratroop training role. Towed to a height of 6,000 metres, the glider had a range of around 140 miles. This example was based at RAF Weston on the Green in Oxfordshire in the early 1940s.
    8 points
  25. Hello again fellow modellers. This week I present another of the small stash I had of Eduard Fw190's. Built from the box and using the suggested colour scheme for the camouflage. It's a different scheme from the usual, which is what attracted me to the build. It is also my best constructed Eduard 190 yet, though I must admit I still struggle to find the best way to put together the undercarriage wheel wells so it fits snugly with the wings. Anyone out there who knows how to do it properly please let me know as I still have one Fw190 to build. Anyway, to this model. Brush painted (as always) using Xtracolour paints and the odd bit of Humbrol here and there. The strange demarcations were achieved by cutting chevrons into some Tamiya masking tape with a scalpel. I thought it worked quite well. Final coat of the Winsor & Newton flat acrylic and this was the result. Not bad for a beginner, but as I have been modelling off and on for 55 years I should be better that this. Here she is.
    8 points
  26. Dog house shmog house... I have been scratching my hoary old head working out how to get on with these two whilst in a bit of a fugue state, mojo deletion process just barely reversed while I was devising this. On the back of said dog house is a very prominent diamond mesh grille, presumably just intended to keep out any flying leaves. Er and possibly ducks, the mesh is quite large. I have no intention of building little gearbox coolers to sit inside the housing, I did that on the Belvedere and it is impossible to see it inside the cooler structure atop the fuselage tail. Just not doing it so my task is to represent the cooling intake mesh without getting bogged down drilling fifty diamond shaped tiny holes. So how about this? This is a scan of part of a page from my Mecanorma Dry Print catalogue, circa 1980. Very scruffy I admit but it has, ey what? Dry Print? Er what I used to use back before the days when Microsoft and Epson made our lives incredibly easier with Ink Jet printers, here, at home using simple programs to operate printing presses of our own. I used Mecanorma and Letraset, you've all heard of Letraset after all, to write on letters, codes and sometimes other things on my models. In the catalogue there are pages of fonts and other wonders, one section has textures for architects to use making architectural drawings. The user might need to draw (cut out from plastic sheets) various shadings and stuff and luckily one section has a variety of dotted pictures for shading, this includes mesh segments Here Close in here is this bit By scanning the image I want I get this And putting the scan into my chosen drawing package, Paint Shop Pro4 ( a freebie off the interweb since my own copy refused to load on my Win 10 computer) I reversed the image to give me the black on white image just above. It looks awful when enlarged as here, but when put into MS Word as an image it can be further manipulated to give an elongated diamond mesh You can enlarge or shrink the image very easily in word and also make the diamond shapes sharper or less sharp, play with it it's fun I made a selection of meshes, one of which will probably become the cooling grid behind the dog house, tests ensued on the remains of the Airfix test mule Sea King shell. Sorry but it had to be put to the test That works for me, you?
    8 points
  27. And so the journey ends I'm happy to say the Porsche 935 is finished and I'm very happy with the results. Here's a pic of the finished build with more to come shortly in the rfi section As always many thanks to everyone who followed along and commented during the build very much appreciated 👍. Thanks for looking back later 🙂👍
    8 points
  28. What would explain a model kit better than its assembly instruction? See instruction pages of the new P-51 B/C Mustang™ on the #armahobbynews and ask your questions about the kit!
    8 points
  29. A 1/48 scale Tamiya kit build of Major George Bostwick’s extremely colourful P-47M ‘Hotrod’ Thunderbolt as it was in mid-1945 after shooting down a Messerschmitt Me-262A jet. To celebrate this feat, it was marked with the addition of a black cowling band to the already colourful 56th Fighter Group dark blue and light blue scheme. Spent rather longer on the weathering and chipping than usual for this build as without it, this scheme tended to look rather too ‘cartoony’ for my taste. Pleased with the end result though 🙂
    8 points
  30. The mojo is creeping back. Not much progress but a start on the tow cables. Ice broken and, hopefully more to follow........................
    7 points
  31. The entire set of images below are the masking, spraying and unmasking of the bodywork in order to create the black bumpers, B-pillars, sills and Scuttle panel / front window surround. The rear window surround I'll paint later. As it is, the masking tape actually pulled off a bit of the plastic rear window surround (last pic), annoying. Usually despite a ton of masking the spray finds it's way into somewhere not wanted, but this time, no overspray. Hurrah.
    7 points
  32. Welcome aboard Mark, may this be the first of many Stranraer's - best of luck Thanks Ratch, the Priest will make for a lovely build. We will look forward to it. Yes SD - however you are not alone and I'm sure i'll add to my Matchbox stash as we get going here... nice haul too! Of course, the Flower Class Corvette... I'm sure that will keep you busy over the next six or so months, we won't expect anything else. We wish you every success getting this one over the line. Two rippers there Marklo. The French Tanks are nice kits and I've always wanted to see the 1/48 Fury built. Have fun and enjoy the GB. Me too!! we can exchange notes on that fidgety wing assembly. Good luck with yours and I'm sure this will spur me on to get mine finished. Always nice to see you on here VP and no surprise you're turning up with a B-17. I'm sure this will turn out lovely. Cheers and welcome. Nice collection JB and I hope you don't mind me putting you down for all four! There's no pressure, so don't stress, but seeing four would certainly be nice. Cheers and good luck. Thanks for that. I've just placed your name against the Meteor, however you're more than welcome to add either or both of the other two as well. Cheers The Swordfish continues Matchbox's excellent tradition of doing a great job on these fabric bi-planes. The radar equipped all-black example is a lovely scheme and would look great in anyone's collection. I'm sure I'll add one to mine one of these days. Cheers and best of luck. Well done Ross, can't have too many Twotters on here, so we will enjoy seeing yours take shape here. Thanks for advising your prospective build. Two more Twotters ... well that makes three so far and there's always potential for many more to come. Another Matchbox classic and deserves to be still produced and built. Cheers mate. A Tomcat, this will be very interesting in that scheme. Nice to see these still being built considering the vast amount of F-14 kits on the market. Have fun and all the best. Onya Dennis and always great to see you on board too. The Matchbox Tempest is a little gem and the Havoc may have some issues, however I'm sure you'll do it more than enough justice. Enjoy the GB. It would not be right not to have a Siskin on here. I've got two of these lovely kits, however have a perverse fear of rigging which is why they are still stashed. Cannot wait to see your build and completion. Cheers. The big scale Sea Venom is a classic Matchbox kit and it was a hard choice for me to go with the Lysander over my boxing of this very same kit. Thanks for joining along with another Matchbox biggie... it's nice to see some of these large kits getting some love too. Well done to all those who have chipped in and shown their hand. I've updated the IP list and am sure there's many more out there so let's see what you've all got! Cheers and big thanks.. Dave
    7 points
  33. If you've followed any of my builds you'll know I build specifically 1:32nd scale WW1 aircraft. However, a friend of mine was a crew chief on No.44 Squadron, RAF, operating the Vulcan B.Mk.2 from RAF Waddington, Lincolshire in the UK. He retired from the RAF, like me, a long time ago and I'm building this as a surprise for his birthday next month. So far the basic model, less canopy and landing gear has been built and primed ready for painting. I wanted to display the aircraft taking off. To that end I modified the inboard engine nozzles and the front and rear spars to accept 8 mm diameter acrylic rod. Two lengths of the rod were heated and bent to the required angles. The base board is 18 mm thick MDF which has been routed around the edges to accept the clear acrylic display cover. I've drilled into, but not through the base to accepts the two acrylic rods. Eventually the case will be wax polished around the edges, with a felt underside.The top of the base will be inset with the embroidered Squadron arm patch with coloured lapel pins of 23 mm diameter, representing the 10 Squadron that flew this aircraft. I just hope the recipient has room in his bungalow for the entire thing, or I'll be looking for another home for it!! Mike
    6 points
  34. Yes, this is what happens when a Lancaster and a Lysander decide to have kids.... The Westland Wendover. This is at its heart a Hawk 1/48 Lysander mated with an aftermarket resin conversion. Other additions, Eduard Lysander P/E set, Quickboost Exhaust, and and various 3D printed parts I created for extra detail, sometimes multiple times But overall it was a cool learning experience. The WIP can be found here: Thanks for stopping by and all comments , suggestions and bad puns are always welcome!
    6 points
  35. Taken a while to do this ...based on the Tamiya late Tiger 1 with lots and lots of extra detailing and work.......hope you like. Steve.
    6 points
  36. MikroMir is to release a 1/144th Myasishchev M-50 "Bounder" kit - ref. 144-??? Source: https://www.facebook.com/mikro.mir.dnepr/posts/4783924505018581 V.P.
    6 points
  37. inspired by this painting, and having been in the stash I wanted another play with the Flory washes and the silly putty masking. This is my take on a 617 Sqn BAC Eagle (believed to be the chosen "in service" name for the production TSR2 Desperately trying to remember the make of resin aftermarket seats? A spare pair of Martel radar guided missiles from an old Flightpath Buck set and a donation of most of the external stores from the Airfix Desert Storm Tornado And onto the finished airframe:
    6 points
  38. Thanks @bigfoot. I used the local manufacturer SMS Paints Scc. No 15 PL152. This was the base coat and once dry I added a drop of white paint for the "faded" large flat open areas. The unit numbers background have been painted on and decals used for the unit numbers and the tank name on the side air vents. I have also added a partial turret interior as the hatches are open and the crew will be out of the turret.
    6 points
  39. Hello everyone, Here is my latest completion, the Airfix 1/72 DH4. This kit has its origins in 1967, making it some 54 years old. Despite its age, the kit is generally accurate in outline and dimensions, and is a great base for a detailing project. It does need some TLC, as the base kit has exaggerated wing ribs, incorrect engine cowling / louver details at the front end, and no cockpit to speak of. It also has a rudimentary “U” shaped set of struts, which slot into channels in the upper wing (leaving unsightly and inaccurate gaps). Hence, I filled in the strut channels, sanded down the flying surfaces, scratch built a new cockpit, corrected the engine louvers to more accurately represent a Rolls Royce Eagle powered variant, added new guns, and various other bits and pieces. I painted the model in the markings of A7422 of No 110 SQN, mid 1917. The markings are a combination of sprayed (for the SQN insignia and number), and decals (roundels, serials). Rigging is using Uschii elastic. Anyways, here are some pictures. I made up a base that paid homage to the old “Palitoy” boxings from the 1980s (this kit never saw a boxing during this time). Here’s some more ‘normal’ pictures: And some progress pictures (for more progress pictures and details of the build, see here https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=12349.0 ): And lastly, I couldn’t resist making up my own Palitoy boxtop (noting again that this kit was never released in this type of boxing): .... oh, and here’s my ‘dogfight double’; with the old Airfix Albatros from 1957 (for more on the Albatros, see here - https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235078105-tribute-to-a-simple-time/ ) This kit is actually quite a good one for its time. It builds easily, is generally accurate, and is a solid base for some additional detailing. Quite a fun project, and a tribute to a simpler time, all in all 😊 All comments and feedback welcome! Cheers, Brad
    6 points
  40. A bit more work on the Firefly. I reduced the graininess of some of the deposits around the running gear then added a little more here and there.
    6 points
  41. They may sound that way for a very good reason ...
    6 points
  42. B-17G 43-37913 named "Seattle Sleeper" took part in the bombing mission to the rail road viaduct at Altenbeken on Sunday, November 26th, 1944. It would be the aircraft's 33rd mission. (photo from https://www.americanairmuseum.com/media/26025 (IWM)) The aircraft had been called "Lucky 13" before, but changed its name when it was taken over by a new 1st pilot, 1st Lt. John Stevens. Stevens, who was 21 at the time, was from Seattle himself. On the 26th, the co-pilot was 2nd Lt. Stanley Johnston (21) from Oregon - it was his third mission. That day the navigator was 1st Lt. John Weisgarber (22) who changed shifts to this flight as it would be his 33rd, coming close to his final mission. The radio operator was Sgt. Rene Pratt (21) from California. This mission would be his 25th. Sgt Quilla Reed (22) was the flight engineer. Sgt. Mabry (Don) Barker (24) was the bomb aimer. The mission on the 26th was supposed to be his last. Sgt. Robert (Bob) Anderson (24) was the ball turret gunner. Sgt Richard (Dick) Trombley (25) was the only waist gunner on board. Sgt Henry (Hank) St. George (21) was the tail gunner. The aircraft's position was in the back of the formation, and according to Slofstra and De Boer's book about the aircraft's crash, it was Johnston the co-pilot who was responsible for maintaining the throttle who let the aircraft fall behind the formation. Despite warnings from the crew, they were unable to catch up and when the formation was attacked by Luftwaffe fighters, Seattle Sleeper was an easy target. Heavily damaged by enemy fire, the aircraft lost altitude but the pilots maintained control and ended up in the clouds. Assessing their odds, they decided to fly back to England. However, the damage was too severe and by the time the aircraft was over The Netherlands the crew abandoned the aircraft - not a minute too soon because shortly after the last crew member had evacuated the aircraft it exploded. The crew landed by parachute around the town of Haulerwijk, not far from the city of Groningen. Debris and wreckage also landed around the town, not causing any significant damage. Pilot 1/Lt. J.R. Stevens evaded capture Co-Pilot 2/Lt. S.F. Johnston evaded capture Navigator 1/Lt. J.C. Weisgarber taken prisoner of war at Norg (Drenthe) Bombardier T/Sgt. M.D. Barker evaded capture Engineer T/Sgt. Q.D. Reed evaded capture Right Waist Gunner T/Sgt. R.P. Pratt taken prisoner of war at Norg (Drenthe) Ball Turret Gunner T/Sgt. R.T. Anderson taken prisoner of war near Noordwijk Waist Gunner S/Sgt. R.A. Trombley evaded capture Tail Gunner S/Sgt. H.M. St.George evaded capture The crash - but also the context in The Netherlands as well as that of the USAAF, and its aftermath with the narratives of the escapees is described extensively in Slofstra and De Boer's book. The title, Vliegers op de Vlucht, is a play on words as "flight" in Dutch is the same as "on the run" - the title translates as something like "Flyers on the run" and "Flyers in flight". I've been working on the model for a few months now, making rather slow progress. I'm adding some parts of Eduard's interior sets, and adding oxygen tanks from Quickboost. Deviating slightly from the build sequence by adding the clear cheek window parts at this stage, masking them from the inside in an attempt to blend them in with the rest of the fuselage. Here's the interior so far: I'm still working on the flight deck and the floor of the nose, and I'm also going to be adding the guns from the inside (leaving the barrels off until the end). As always, thanks for looking!
    5 points
  43. Good afternoon chaps The bird cage is entirely painted semi-gloss black The gear shift lever has been scratched with 0.4 mm piano wire, and the knob has been made with UV curing clear resin (painted ivory) Wait a bit for next steps
    5 points
  44. A treatise, disconnected, on Hawks tells us not to be surprised... Nah not really, quite innovative and humourous really.
    5 points
  45. So, unfortunately, I just missed the deadline for posting in the Gallery. Here we are finished - a lovely kit. Thank you Airfix! Thank you for all of the helpful comments. Off to the Viggen now! Icarus
    5 points
  46. Good morning, happy modellers. I want to show you that I don't just do 1/72nd dioramas; Here is a 1/48 B26 Marauder that I built recently. This B26 may look very clean, but they were all brand new at first, isn't it right? I may have been influenced by the state of cleanliness of the one presented on display at the Landing Museum in Utah Beach, France. What more have I done on this model? I just engraved the panels lines, rectified the diameter of the engine cowlings, detailed the lower machine gun bays, one of which is open. This model thus enriches my collection of twin engines used by the allies on June 6, 1944: I really enjoy building the Monogram models! I hope you enjoy. Regards, Eric-Snafu35
    5 points
  47. And here it is...Result of few weeks of hard work... Resin 1/32 DH.90 Dragonfly from Lukgraph. Great set, has some minor problems but everything is quite easy to correct. PM me if you'll ever need help with it. About dirtyness of model... I know that real DH.90 G-AEDU is perfectly clean. To be fair,I had to sand a lot from topside of model (because of my own mistake) so I had to cheat with painting, I mean to make it look more 3D. Then I had to unify overall look so, yes, It looks worn and dirty. And yes, I'd overdone it
    5 points
  48. I still absolutely suck at weathering, what can I say?
    5 points
  49. Hi all, Here's the finished Vulcan. 'Flory Models' grey clay wash over the upper surfaces, Dark Dirt on the underside and landing gear. Sealed with 'Alclad' Light Sheen (ALC-311). I also used 'Tamiya' weathering master (soot and oil) around some parts and decals. I've also added a couple of antenna that are included in the kit and the upper navigation light. Now it's onto completing the display base, Mike
    5 points
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