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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/12/2021 in all areas

  1. Kineticmodel 's excellent F-104J is in the cabinet. I used Fundekals for markings. I really enjoyed this build. Full details of the build and more photos at my blog but here's some pic's for those not interested yn that
    38 points
  2. G'day all. It's been a while since a completion. It just so happens I reduced the stash by one this afternoon. This is the lovely 1/72 Airfix S2C Buccaneer. It's a great kit to build with only two real gripes. I found that the inserts for the exhausts at the rear fuselage required some material removal as did a small amount at the nose to fuselage join. Other than that she's in the display cabinet safely. Kit decals used as XV336 while with 800 NAS on HMS Eagle in June 1971. I opted for the folded wings and deployed airbrake not so much as a space saver, but because I think its an airframe that doesn't look too bad like this. Keen to hear you thoughts. Cheers, Mick
    17 points
  3. Hello, This is my build of the Sword Skyraider, I folded the wings using the Airwaves photo etch set which is meant for the Hasegawa kit but with slight modification it will work with the Sword kit! I also changed the markings using both the kit decals and those from Avalon, to an aircraft that landed on HMAS Melbourne although I have not been able to replicate the Roo zap! The Airwaves photo etch set....
    16 points
  4. Good morning. I finished the construction of a B17F Revell whose assembly is here: This is my latest diorama, which is also a bit of a way to remember all the airmen who have been shot down. This B17 bomber was shot down on February 21, 1944. His pilot belly landed his plane because he was injured, his co-pilot and upper turret gunner KIA, two engines out , a destroyed oxygen system and a ragged rudder (among other battle damage!). The victorious hunter, Heinrich "Heinz" Bär, came the next day with other pilots to inspect the wreckage. A Propaganda Staffel team was also there to film the scene. Figs are Preiser's ones. I dressed the Germans with paper coats The pilots came in a Kubelwagen (Italeri): and the kriegberichter in a Kfz15 Horsch (ACE) The German pilots unpacked the rescue kit consisting of a dinghy: I made this raft with paper tubes, which I covered with Mister Surfacer and which I painted in Humbrol Matt24: I crushed the paper dinghy to make it look deflated To furnish the boat, I made the "Gibson Girl": This radio transmitter is so called because of its shapes, of course! Some battle damages: I like the funny details: The Luftwaffe technicians thought they could recover the wreckage, but a flight of P51 strafed it. The unfortunate Miss Ouachita found herself in aluminum ingots to supply the German factories. Here is a new B17 in my collection. Well, I think that I will run out of space soon!: Thanks for watching. Regards from France, Eric-Snafu35
    16 points
  5. Right, I have at last got the upper surfaces of the wings and tail planes how I want them. The darker shade of MRP linen arrived a few hours after my last post and proved to be answer. Consequently, much of my time since their arrival has been taken up by masking off the rib tapes, @AdrianMF was quite right when he said I would need a truckload of masking tape. Anyway, the white tapes were masked off and the darker linen colour painted on to the flying surfaces and when dry, the masking tape was removed from the ribs. This left too starker contrast but I knew that it would do so in advance. I then misted the lighter linen colour over the flying surfaces until I got the effect I was looking for. Away from the flying surfaces, I completed painting and varnishing the second batch of struts and painted the propeller with a wood grain effect. Next up is to get the control surfaces painted and we are then good to go for doing some actual building. Now that I have got a system sorted out as to how to get the effect on linen surfaces that I want, I am quite looking forward to having a bash at @general melchett's tri-plane. I have sent off for a bi-plane jig, having got tired of messing about with home made jigs for this type of model. Thanks for looking Martian
    16 points
  6. Hi guys !! This is the Trumpeter 1/35 Mid Tiger I. Vehicle is based on the 2/502 vehicles, fighting at the Narva Bridgehead in early ‘44. Thanks to @DByrden for confirming the location as Vaivara Station. The vehicle is based on these photos, and I could not see any Zimmerit on these particular vehicles and photos, or the third photo shown in the build log. So, on to the build. Basically straight from the box, with just tow cables added, cold weather tarps from parchment paper, and a limited pallet of Vallejo and Windsor and Newton oils. Thanks for taking the time to look Lee.
    15 points
  7. Finnair have a history of 35 years in operating various DC-9 to MD-80 variants. The company started to use the short DC-9-14's in 1971 and the last long fuselage MD-82's went out of service in 2006. The growth in the size of the DC-9/MD-80 sub types during those years has been massive. The length grew by 13 metres, the wing span by 6 metres and the passenger capacity by almost 70 seats. In all, Finnair have been a very McDonnell-Douglas oriented airline throughout the years. Their fleet has consisted of DC-3, DC-6, DC-8, DC-9, DC-10, MD-80 and MD-11 planes. The only Boeings have been one 737-200 and seven 757-200's. The Airbusses have started to take over the Finnair fleet from 1999 onwards. I built the 1/144 scale DC-9-14 from an Authentic airliners resin kit with 26Decals livery set. The MD-82 is a Minicraft kit with Draw Decals markings.The both kits were of very good quality and in my opinion the Minicraft MD-82 is one of their best kits. One of the most interesting details I scratch built to the MD-82 was the odd looking splash guard of the front landing gear wheel that prevents foreign articles from flying into the engines. History has it that people have sometimes called the air controllers very worried because they saw that that some rubbish had been stuck to the front wheel of the plane
    12 points
  8. Here are some pictures of my HpH Models Messerschmitt ME 410 in 1/32nd scale. It is a multi-media mainly resin kit, it is not Tamiya and I didn't expect it to be. From a cottage industry limited run kit a little trimming, sanding, head-scratching is to be expected but I loved every minute of building. The kit is on the expensive side but looking at the end result it is worth every penny! The surface detail is superb! Thanks for checking in! Peter
    12 points
  9. Although I've built 3 Revell Tornados this is the second successfull build as it's been sitting waiting to be completed. It's Eduards Desert Babe kit which I was lucky to have ordered early on the first run. Wasn't sure what weapons fit to go with and ended up going for 4 x 1000lb bombs from Reskit. Also added AIM-9's from AMK's weapons kit and a Master Pitot probe. Finished with MRP Desert Pink.
    12 points
  10. Wrapped up the 1/48 Super etendard. A nice kit, some minor fit issues but overall very impressive and much better than the Jaguar. The dark grey is Model Master and the light grey is a Tamiya home brew. Both acrylic.
    12 points
  11. So this GB almost escaped me, but I managed a last day 12 hour build (with football and gardening interruptions!) of a New York urban scene using resin details, paper accessories and wooden parts for an all plastic-free build. Come see images of the real New York graffiti this was based on in the rather brief WIP thread
    12 points
  12. AEC type 0854 Matador 6x6 10 ton Refueller in 1:144 scale CAD drawings done with Fusion 360 3D prints on an Anycubic Photon printer using UV resin. Build thread here.
    12 points
  13. NFS Firemen My build thread is here #
    12 points
  14. Hasegawa's 1:48th scale Phantom FGR.2 I added a cockpit set from Aires, seamless intakes from Alley Cat and after market decals from Model Alliance to make a 14Squadron machine based at RAF Bruggen in 1970. A fairly straightforward build. Cutting & grinding needed to fit the cockpit & intakes, but noting too difficult. Painted with Xtracolor enamels & Mr Color acrylics. Thanks for looking Angelo.
    11 points
  15. Hallo all! My name is Luca and i'm new here. here some pics of my new built and first post here, the Airfix Hunter F.6 in 1:48 converted to a Mk58. I've add some Eduard PE`s, pitot by Master, flaps by A.M.U.R. Reaver and decals by McOne "Late Swiss Hunter". Hope you enjoy! Cheers from Switzerland. Luca
    11 points
  16. Napoleonic Guard Drummer Verlinden Productions 120mm by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
    11 points
  17. 11 points
  18. Hi everyone i've just finish this helicopter. The kit was very fit and detail, Especially the interior (It's a pity that it was all covered up) Thanks for watching !
    10 points
  19. Good evening everyone. Probably being one of the only people in this country not following the football I managed to squeeze some time in tonight to get some paint work done on Jim’s Mustang. lots on over the past couple of days but I’m trying to snatch moments here and there to get this beauty moving forward. This morning saw some details get added back into the cowl panels. Not perfect but they are pleasing to my eyes and that’ll do. Next up is the first pass of pure shade. Top side. And a dead one, hopefully to coax @CedB into the room. After that I wanted to use the stencils to give some heavy variation. Lots of different distances on offer for Happy blotches. Under side. Overall I’m happy with that. Decided not to go the full hog with both colours and do a bit of post shading instead. Here’s the first few passes on the underside. Grey! I thought it was a blue but hey what are you going to do? and a few more with a bit of lightness in the panel centers. Seems to be working well for my have scheme. To keep it going I didn’t bother glossing before masking. So jumped right in with the green. Nice light passes. Eventually getting here. I added some white to the mix and doubled the thinners to have a lighter centre panel post shade. this worked well but to my eye I was losing some of the juice! So I made a very thinned wash of the green with a spot of yellow add back some of that warmth. It’s super subtle but I like the way it’s turned out. I have some really nice ware going on. I hope Jim likes it. Too eager to wait until tomorrow the masking had to come off. That demarcation line looks great. Pity I have to cover it up with Stripes. I simply have to wait a good few hours to dry now before I gloss. I’m not brave enough to do the stripes without it. I’m bound to scratch the paint off I didn’t. So that’s where we leave her. More action tomorrow. Thanks for dropping by. Any comments welcome. Take care y’all and as always. Happy Modelling. Johnny.
    10 points
  20. Final "Blitzbuild" - wartime buildings My two day build
    10 points
  21. Hi guys finished latest scratchbuilt railgun , Saint Chamond built eight of these very large calibre 400 mm howitzers fielded in the summer of 1916 they were very effective. The model is in 1 72 scale, 12 inches long hand painted in the usual French patterned camouflage figs are from W D models.
    9 points
  22. Hello These are two U.S.M.C Sherman's from Italeri in 1/35. Both have after marked PE from Eduard and Verlinden, and scratch built parts, like the spikes (stretched plastic) and side planks (Balsa). I hope you like it. Pedro Azevedo
    9 points
  23. Remarkably, 2021 marks the 10th anniversary of the Scottish Aviation Jetstream leaving UK military service after the last T.2s of 750 NAS were retired in March 2011. Even more surprising is the range of AModel kits in 1/72 that have been produced in recent years, allowing numerous variants of the type to be built by modellers, as well as the return of the venerable 1960s era Airfix kit. And with new decal sheets on the way from both Model Art and Xtradecal, the time seemed right for a photo review of the Jetstream’s career with both the RAF and FAA. The Jetstream was the swansong of Handley Page Ltd, one of the last of the independent British aircraft manufacturers. Originally seen as the saviour of the company, this potentially world class aircraft resulted in its demise due to spiralling costs. Cancelled orders from both RAF and USAF together with the fact that the company refused to become part of the conglomerates of BAC or Hawker Siddeley, meant that Handley Page went into liquidation in 1969. In 1971 a company was formed at Sywell to continue production of the Jetstream - appropriately called Jetstream Aircraft Ltd - but this lasted only briefly. The design and production rights were then acquired by Scottish Aviation Ltd (SAL), who produced an initial 26 machines that had been subsequently ordered by the RAF on 24 February 1972 to replace the ageing Vickers Varsity in the multi-engine pilot training role. SAL had 15 sets of completed wings with seven more in assembly. The tail units were already under sub-contract to North-West Industries of Canada. Three Handley Page fuselages were completed and a further eleven were in storage. In addition, seven fuselages were partly completed which left SAL needing five more to complete the MOD contract. After looking for a sub contractor to compete the work, SAL decided to set up their own production line for these fuselages and they completed the contract, the last RAF Jetstream T.1 - XX500 being flown in December 1976. Compared to the civil version, the military Jetstream was fitted with the more powerful Turbomeca Astazou XVID engines. However, the type had an inauspicious start to its early RAF career as a series of Defence White Papers in the mid 70s led to drastic reductions in the Service’s strategic and tactical transport fleets and consequently a temporary cessation to multi engine pilot training requirements. Four early production Jetstream T.1s s were delivered to the CFS at RAF Little Rissington in late 1973 to allow for the training of type qualified QFIs (XX476/30, XX477/-, XX478/32 and XX480/33). A further seven went to 5 FTS at RAF Oakington by mid-1974 (XX479, XX481-XX486). However, these assignments were brief as Oakington was slated for closure, and 5 FTS itself disbanded on October 10th 1974. The ex 5 FTS machines transferred over to Little Rissington ahead of that station also closing; the 11 aircraft then already in service were placed in storage at 19 MU RAF St Athan pending a decision on their fate. The remaining aircraft from the 26 on order also went directly to St Athan except for XX488 which became the SAL company prototype T.2 for the RN. After reassessing its needs, RAF multi-engine training recommenced in November 1976 with the Multi Engine Training School (METS) being formed at RAF Leeming as a component of 3 FTS. The eight aircraft complement was made up of XX492, and XX494-XX500, all new build airframes coded 70 through 77 respectively. At the same time, the RAF had concluded that fourteen of its recent acquisitions were now surplus to requirements (a further airframe, XX477, had been lost in an accident at Little Rissington in 1974 following a fuel feed problem which led to the loss of both engines). These were offered to the RN to replace its ageing Sea Prince fleet, used for Observer training purposes. To make them fit for purpose, some modification was required, most notably the installation of the MEL E190 weather and terrain-mapping radar in a modified radome, and the fitting of consoles in the cabin for the students. In the process the Jetstream T.2 "Flying Classroom" had been born. METS tenure at RAF Leeming was relatively short as on April 30 1979, the squadron relocated to RAF Finningley where it was absorbed within 6 FTS. Upon transfer, the aircraft lost their two digit identification codes to become A to H respectively. Also, the unit complement increased by two with the arrival of XX482 from store at St Athan as ‘78’ (which became ‘J’ on transfer); and XX491, which had been returned to SAL for trials, was delivered as ‘79’ before finally becoming ‘K’. The fleet was increased by one further aircraft on May 11 1979 with the arrival of XX493; this became ‘L’ completing the establishment of 11 aircraft which were retained until near the end of RAF service. On 1 July 1992, METS took on the number plate of 45 Reserve Sqn from previous incumbent the TWCU which in turn had become 15 Reserve Sqn. In 1995 the unit was on the move again, and on 31 August began relocating to RAF Cranwell where once again it became part of 3 FTS. While at Cranwell, XX492/A was the only Jetstream on the unit to receive the RAF College light blue fuselage band. March 17 2004 represented the beginning of the end for UK military operation of the Jetstream when 45(R) Sqn at RAF Cranwell replaced its aircraft with much newer Serco owned Beech King Air 200s. With age had come a lack of reliability and the fleet simply wasn't able to achieve the required 5400 hours per year to allow the courses to be completed. This in turn had created a need for some of the flying hours to be contracted out hence the earlier than planned arrival of the King Air. Back to the Jetstream’s career in the Senior Service. Deliveries of the former RAF T.1s to the FAA began in October 1978, but it was September 1984 before all 14 converted T.2 aircraft had been received by 750 NAS at RNAS Culdrose. Due to an expanding requirement for Observers, a further two Jetstream 2 series airframes were sourced from the civilian market. F-BTMI which became ZA110 and 9Q-CTC which became ZA111. Their first flights with military identities came in July and December of 1981. Unlike their red, white and light aircraft grey painted brethren, these two were delivered in the blue and white colours that the whole fleet would wear until retirement. The Royal Navy placed an order for four brand new Jetstream 31 aircraft in 1985, to augment its fleet of T.2s. Deliveries of ZE438-441 took place in 1986 and this more modern variant gained the T.3 designation, giving 750 NAS a total complement of 20 airframes. For their intended role the T.3s were equipped with a Doppler fed Tactical Air Navigation System (TANS) and the Racal ASR360 multi-mode radar, the antenna for which was located in a large fairing underneath the fuselage. After being operated by 750 NAS in the communications role for a while, the aircraft were moved to RNAS Yeovilton to replace the ageing Herons of Flag Officer Naval Air (FONA)/Heron Flight. 750 NAS suffered its own tragic loss of an aircraft at Portland in 1989. XX489 was displaying at a Cadet Day on May 8th when it stalled during a wingover and fell into the sea, killing both pilots. In 1996 XX475, which was one of the aircraft offered to and converted for Royal Navy use, passed into the hands of the Defence Test Evaluation Organisation (DTEO) and later the Defence Evaluation Research Agency (DERA) at West Freugh. As with almost all the test aircraft from that era, it was repainted into the trademark 'raspberry ripple' colour scheme with bold titles. XX485 and XX490 were delivered to the Uruguayan Navy as A-875 and A-876 in December 1998 having been deemed to be surplus to the Royal Navy's requirements. Both have subsequently been withdrawn from service by their new owners. In July 2008 it was announced that the Jetstreams of 750 NAS were to be replaced by a Cobham FR Aviation subsidiary supplied, modified and maintained fleet of new Beechcraft King Air 350ERs. Heron Flight and the T.3 followed the RAF's T.1s into the history books on September 29th 2008 with three aircraft initially going into storage at RAF Cranwell and the other to RAF Shawbury. And so to March 2011 and the Jetstream's UK military swansong. With the final Jetstream 32 week / 70 flying hour Basic Observer's Course ending on 7th March, it just remained for 750 NAS to prepare to bid farewell to the type at the end of that month. Since retirement from active military service, it is perhaps surprising how many complete Jetstreams have been preserved at home or abroad. No less than four former RAF T.1s are on display at museums in the UK: XX492 at Newark, XX494 at East Midlands Aeropark, XX495 at the South Yorks Air Museum and XX496 at the RAFM Cosford. This perhaps demonstrates the significance of this elegant but perhaps rather under appreciated type in UK military service history. Firstly here's a list of all Jetstreams in UK military service, their useage and eventual fates. A 1977 view of Jetstream T.1 XX478 while in storage, awaiting conversion to a T.2 variant for the FAA. This aircraft has had its tail code removed but was previously ‘32’ with the CFS. XX491/K of 6FTS/METS RAF Finningley seen here at RNAS Culdrose Air Day in July 1991. XX494/B on static display at the RAF Alconbury Air Fete on 23 August 1992. Note that the aircraft is by now wearing the 45(R) Sqn fin stripe and unit badge following METS becoming a Reserve Squadron on 1 July that year. A 1998 view of XX492/A of 3 FTS/45(R) Sqn seen outside the squadron’s HQ at RAF Cranwell. This machine was the only Jetstream assigned to 3 FTS to receive the famous RAF College blue fuselage band. XX493/L of 3 FTS/45(R)Sqn photographed prior to departing RAF Waddington in July 2003. Shortly prior to the Jetstream’s retirement from RAF service in March 2004, 45(R) Sqn facilitated a media flight from which these three air-to- air photos were obtained. Seen here is XX497/E. XX497/E in company with XX492/A (photo courtesy Peter Foster via Chris Cannon). XX500/H banking over the Lincolnshire countryside. After retirement XX496/D was transferred to the RAF Museum collection at Cosford. Another ex RAF Jetstream to be preserved is XX495/C, currently part of the South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum at Doncaster where it was seen in Feb 2020. 750 NAS of the FAA became the largest military operator of the Jetstream initially receiving 14 former RAF T.1s that had been converted into Mk T.2 flying classrooms. The aircraft retained their former RAF Training Command red/white/light grey scheme upon transfer but were later repainted in more appropriate blue/white/grey livery. This photo taken at the Newbury Air Festival in May 1980 shows T.2 XX488/CU 571 in the original colours but with RN titling and red/white propellers. An undated view of T.2 XX489/CU 575. This example was lost while displaying on 8 May 1989 over Portland Harbour, Dorset with the tragic loss of both crew. Two images of T.2 XX481/CU 560 of 750 NAS seen displaying at RIAT in July 2006. T.2 XX476 CU/561 touching down at RIAT 2009 at RAF Fairford. T.2 XX478 CU/564 also captured at RIAT 2009. Note the 100 years of Naval Aviation markings on the rear fuselage and fin. T.2 XX488 CU/562 photographed at an RAF Northolt photocall in June 2009. T.2 ZA111 CU/565 was one of two later acquisitions for the FAA 750 NAS, along with sister aircraft ZA110, required to meet an uplift in RN Observer training requirements. It is seen here at RIAT in 2009. ZE438/576, one of four T.3 variants procured for the RN. Initially delivered to 750 NAS for observer training, it was later reassigned to FONAC/Heron Flight at RNAS Yeovilton in a Communications/light transport role, replacing their elderly Sea Herons. Seen here at Wittering in February 2002. T.3 ZE439/577 on static display at RNAS Yeovilton in July 2000. Note the large under fuselage fairing, a distinguishing feature of this variant. XX475. The first prototype UK military Jetstream that served with the RAF as a T.1 before conversion to a T.2 for the RN, and then in 1996, was assigned to the MOD test fleet at DERA/DTEO West Freugh. Hope this has been of interest. Thanks for looking Mark
    9 points
  24. Being as I posted up my Tyrrell P34, figured I better do the Porsche a turn...here goes...I started documenting this build late so unfortunately I have no close up shots of the (now buried) engine......thes pics will have to suffice. *Images of engine/fuel tank and interior are taken during build process...difficult to photo now... Interior details... So thats about it...not a standard build, go check it out here on Britmodeller!! Thanks...Enjoy your modelling
    9 points
  25. This is the venerable Hasegawa F-111 which has been boxed in virtually every version of the F-111 made. In this case it is the EF-111A Electronic Counter Measures (ECM) version. Every boxing I have seen of this kit shows it with the wings swept forward and the flaps fully extended, Such as with my FB-111A that I built of a few years ago but what I have never seen advertised is that Hasegawa engineered this kit to also display it, with only minor surgery, with the wings fully swept back and and the flaps fully retracted. So I decided to show what the process is to pull it off. Also I needed to do it to save display shelf space First on the upper and lower fuselage there are 2 thinned areas of plastic that need to be removed. Here on the upper fuselage: and here on the lower: and here they are removed Once you glue them together the opening will look like this Next is the somewhat more complex work on the wings. The front slats have several little tabs that fir into notches on the lower wings These need to be extended to the top of the wing once this is done the slats will more or less neatly fit into the wing leading edge For the flaps the whole extensions of them need to be removes Being careful to leave the small stubs that fir into the wing trailing edge Again once done they will fit into the wings Finally there is a tab in the upper fuselage half, hard to see here that a slot on the upper wing fits into. Slot A is for the fully forward wing and slot B in for the fully swept wing. Note projection C, broken here, will engage with a pin in the upper fuselage in the fully forward position to give it extra strength. We don't need this in the swept position. So once all this is done we get this; And this is how it looks fully assembled So now that that is over we can finish the build. I used the Eduard interior and the Caracal 72101 decal sheet. I chose the "Mistress of Deception" marking because it is such a great name. I have to note that this is the first time I have had issues with Caracal decals. These had a very thin film, which is good, but it was so thin that they were had to position without them wanting to roll up into a ball. Anyway. Here it is Here are my 3 F-111 builds together. From left to right these are F-111E, FB-111A nd EF-111A Next up will be the Sword TAV-8A. Enjoy
    9 points
  26. Here’s my first entry into a ground vehicle group build. I’m a huge petrolhead; if it’s fast and has a powerful engine, I’m likely to appreciate it. This seemed like the ideal opportunity to build a Shelby, so here I am. The base model is an AMT ’67 Shelby that I picked up cheap on a well known auction site, which had had a few pieces stuck to the bodyshell: As you can see from the box contents below, it’s well below the 25% mark (I really rather like that it comes with a mini box to assemble as well): Assembly by the previous owner is limited to the fitting of the front and back panels, plus the four side scoops to the body. The side scoops are pretty well fitted, the front and rear panels really don’t fit very well at all: I’d hoped that a trip in the freezer would allow me to prize them off, but no luck so far. I’m now looking into alternative options for that (suggestions gratefully received). I’d like to be able to remove the scoops as well, it would make opening up the vents in it much easier. I’m not going to build this one out of the box, I’m planning a restomod-type build. Browsing aftermarket options for engines, I found a supercharged version of the Coyote found in the modern Mustangs, which is now on it’s way across the pond to me. I’m also looking into my options for big wheels and brakes. The interior will get some modern bucket seats as well. Colourwise, I’m taking inspiration from a BMW M5 Touring finished in dark purple with a two-tone grey interior https://www.classicdriver.com/en/car/bmw/m5/1995/707056 I’ve used the 3D Tuning configuration site http://www.3dtuning.com/en-US/ to knock up a couple of views of what I’m hoping to build, one with the classic Torq Thrust wheels, another with Volk TE37’s:
    8 points
  27. Hello The car is finished. In the autumn I'll make the glass window with the mirrored background part. The figurine that will be animated is 80% done, the program is ok. I retain 2 things, the "handmade" is the incredible thing for people, as well as the realization of the aluminium body (especially the engine bonnet with its louvers and the rear curve of the body). All this was a first experience and I had a lot of fun with it...so there will be another car that is maturing in my head. For the few "perfectionists" of the Fiatb 806, ok it is not perfect but the project is finished and as I say: "It's only a model and its value is only what I give it". Oh, I forgot, it caught the eye of a friend who makes a paper fanzine and who wants to put a picture and a link to my work, and other requests.... Thanks to you all Edit 21/08/2021 Hello You may have noticed that on some of the pictures there is a figurine. This figure is an integral part of my car. A challenge was to turn it into an automaton. To see the details of its realization I propose you to see its realization page 6: Automaton of my figurine In this section of the forum, I propose you the video of the figurine animated with the noise of the engine....after a few seconds, she nods "ok my boy, you can start the engine", then she looks at the different instruments of her dashboard.... A+ Manu
    8 points
  28. I'm a fan of the "Ali d'Italia" series of monographs, one of the best printed resources for WW2 Italian aircraft. These typically have side-by-side Italian and English text, but if you have no. 22 on the Macchi 202, you may have noticed there is a section on p.55 that's Italian only. Well...for what it's worth, Google Translate - with a little editing by me - came up with this (anyone who speaks Italian better than this old hillbilly - please chime in with improvements!): Technical Amendments C.202 During its production life, the C.202 underwent 116 technical changes; many of these referred to minor details (the diameter of some bolts, the reinforcement of a joint, etc.), while some were of greater importance (armored glass application, installation of wing guns, stabilizer with compensated balance, etc.) Each modification was formalized on a special "Proposal Form" which thoroughly described the interventions to be carried out, and was applied after the designer's approval. It is interesting to emphasize two points: 1) The modifications were classified according to three categories, designated A, B and C. Those of type A were to be installed on all new-build aircraft, as well as those already in service, by factory personnel; those of type B, in addition to new aircraft, were also to be installed on previous aircraft on the occasion of repairs and overhauls; those of type C did not apply retroactively. By way of example, modification no. 74 "Application of armored glass to the windscreen" was of type A; no. 65 "Fuel pump cooling box" was of type B; while no. 60 "Tailwheel of type D" was classified C. 2) The application of changes almost never coincided with the start of a new Series. The purpose of the various Series designations was to establish subsequent production orders, and did not signal the introduction of specific construction or set-up changes; in practice they had a more administrative than technical significance. The "Proposal Form" indicated, from time to time, the Military Registration Number from which a modification had to be installed, giving specific instructions to each of the three manufacturers: AerMacchi, Breda, and SAI Ambrosini. From a construction point of view, there were in fact no differences between the models of the three companies; although the camouflage finish, interpreted in a slightly different way by the painters at Varese, Sesto S.Giovanni, and Passignano sul Trasimeno, made it possible to identify the maker at a glance [see Aerofan no. 76, "The Colors of the Folgore;" or "Ali e Colori" series, nos. 4 and 5]. On the contrary, every effort was made to ensure perfect interchangeability between the components. For this purpose, specimens called "Arlecchino" ("harlequin?") were required by contract, to verify compatibility of parts from different assembly locations. Only one "Arlecchino" from AerMacchi-Breda (MM 9415) is known; if there were others (a triple AerMacchi-Breda-SAI "Arlecchino" was also planned), no documentary trace remains.
    8 points
  29. THE UNSEEN UNIVERSITY Ankh-Morpork, The Discworld, The Multiverse, L-Space* Terry Pratchett * L-space, short for library-space. Large quantities of books warp space and time around them. The principle of L-space revolves around a seemingly logical equation; it is an extension of the 'Knowledge is Power' equation. BOOKS = KNOWLEDGE = POWER = (FORCE X DISTANCE ÷ TIME).
    8 points
  30. This is the WIP that wasn't supposed to be! I recently completed the seventh addition to my collection of Wisconsin Air National Guard aircraft, the OA-37B "Dragonfly" which left just two more aircraft to complete my project: the A-10A Thunderbolt II (a.k.a. "Warthog") and the O-1A Cessna Skymaster. I've never been a fan of the Skymaster, mainly because that's the aircraft the Wisconsin ANG was given when their F-102 Delta Daggers were taken away from them. Imagine, going from a supersonic hotrod to a pedestrian, prop-driven general aviation aircraft! But, that's what happened. In 1974 the Wisconsin ANG's 115th Fighter Group converted to the forward air control mission and became the 115th Tactical Air Support Group, trading in their Delta Daggers (top speed: Mach 1.22) for Cessna Skymasters (top speed: 200 mph). The group flew Skymasters until 1979, when they transitioned to the OA-37B "Dragonfly". My plan was to begin work on the A-10 as my next Wisconsin ANG model. However, a few aftermarket items I had ordered hadn't yet arrived, so I decided to do a quick build of the Airfix Skymaster sitting in my stash. My thought was, being a simple kit, I could get the Skymaster done in a few days (a week at most) and then start on the Warthog. No WIP, just build the Skymaster and post a quick RFI. Little did I suspect . . . Here's the kit: Opening the box, I found just what I had expected: a couple of sprues, a few clear parts, a small decal sheet, and rudimentary instructions. I began with the cockpit items. Instrument panel -- not exactly like the real thing, but not much will be visible anyway: Cockpit. Airfix provides four seats (like the civil version), but the O-1 had only two, plus a boatload of radio equipment in back. I left out the two surplus seats and scratched a representative rack of electronics: Again, not much will be visible, so I didn't put a bunch of effort into replicating the actual aircraft's interior. I then turned my attention to the fuselage, and that's where things began to go south . . . First off, the clear parts don't fit at all. The windscreen is about 1mm wider than the fuselage, and the openings for all the other clear parts are too large, leaving major gaps around the clear parts. For the windscreen, I was forced to cut it in half and remove enough from the center to let it fit the fuselage. Fortunately, the actual windscreen has a central frame, which I re-created with styrene strip. This not only hid my cut line, but provided extra support for the glue joint. My solution for the two windows in the cabin roof was to cut away the roof, frame in the clear parts, and (later) glue the framed-in windows into the roof: The O-1 has glazing in the starboard door and forward fuselage to improve downward visibility on the righthand side of the aircraft. Airfix included clear parts for this, but they only vaguely resemble the actual glazing and (like most all the other clear parts) are much smaller than the cutaway they are supposed to fit into: To correct this, I thought I'd try a technique I found in @Rob K. 's ongoing B-17 build -- namely, use UV-activated clear resin to create the desired windows. I cut away part of the starboard fuselage and replaced it with a styrene panel, in which I had cut the desired window openings. I then put tape on the outside of the panel, filled the inside of the openings with the clear resin, and cured it with a UV lamp: Not bad, I thought (patting myself on the back). Then I realized, I had put the windows in UPSIDE DOWN ! ! ! So, I had to do it all over again, right-side up this time. With that embarrassing situation behind me, I was able to close-up the fuselage (not forgetting to put in copious nose weight): (Note the putty around the side windows, filling the huge gaps caused by Airfix's too-large openings) I also began work on the wings. Each wing comes in top and bottom halves, with a slot for the boom. How Airfix expected anyone to install the booms is beyond me, as there is clear daylight almost everywhere between the booms and their corresponding slots: I packed the slots with styrene strip until I was able to get a close fit: The real trick will be assembling the wings and booms so that everything is properly aligned and square. I'll likely need to rig up some kind of jig to help with that. Anyways, that's what I've been about the past couple days. I can't wait for my A-10 items to arrive, so I can begin an easier, more relaxing build!
    7 points
  31. EDIT. TITLE CHANGED TO REFLECT ANOTHER CAR BEING ADDED TO THE BUILD. Details at the bottom of the page. Another entry from me. It's another of those black Hertz rent-a-racers. It's going to be a curbside build to keep things simple. I have a later Boss 302 that I intend detailing a bit more for later. It's going to be going together alongside my other entry, also a Hertz kit, but built as a street car. Doing the two together will keep downtime to a minimum. In theory. Here's progress so far. I started yesterday and a bit more got done today. Out the box and cleanup commences. Front and rear valances fitted and seams sanded down. No filler needed anywhere. Tamiya grey primer, rubbed down and re-coated as a few tiny marks showed. Rubbed down again and ready for a bit of paint. Interior tub undercoated with Humbrol grey yesterday followed by a scrubbing with black oil paint this morning. I'll let that dry for a day or two before adding a satin topcoat. Then I took a couple of brave pills and fired on some Tamiya Gloss Black. It went on like glass. Nice paint. It's settled back a bit but this is it's first coat. A good flat off and another coat or two will happen over the next couple of days. The gold Hertz stripes look really nice on the decal sheet. I'm a bit concerned about adding the gold decals over the hood scoop and around the windscreen vents though. Just in case they play up, I've tried a bit of Tamiya gold over a bit of black painted plastic card with thoughts of possibly painting the stripes on. I like the painted gold over the decals but those sill stripes look a bit daunting to copy! Tony.
    7 points
  32. Hi all, Finished off this build of the Federation Pursuit Ship resin kit today, so I thought I would share. Lovely kit, although not without its challenges. Now I'm starting to build a studio scale version of the filming model, so watch this space ...
    7 points
  33. I was given this kit as a birthday present from my work colleagues back in February as this year was a significant milestone (or mill-stone?) birthday. I finally got round to building it in the last few weeks after the marathon of the Babylon 5 Starfury for the Anything but Injection GB. I can't honestly say its a great kit, there were major fit issues, particularly with the roof (which has the driver and passenger door windows moulded into it!!) However, these problems were eventually overcome and it turned out be a nice little model that looks good on the shelf with my other fire engines. I can't in all honesty say its one of my better builds, but it will do
    7 points
  34. Ah, the joys of being my own boss. Being so close to the finish line with this build I let myself have today working on it. The first task was resorting to the kit transfers for the serial numbers, W/T markings and those lovely boot print markings. The transfers were very thin, and generally floated on well. As I elected not to gloss coat the entire model, I floated the stickers onto a bed of Humbrol acrylic gloss clear in the hope it would eliminate most silvering. It did for about half the time. I will need to spend a bit of time punching through and flooding things with varnish later. After a quick coat of W&N Galeria matt varnish, it was time to tackle the undercarriage and remaining strut work. The main gear legs look horribly fragile, but once glue has set and liquid cement done its magic, the assembly is quite strong. I glued in my made-up metal tail wheel and fitted the tail struts - none of which met with any of the location holes. I think a little filler and paint retouching will be required. The undercarriage all needs painting properly anyway. So, aside from the vulnerable bits like pitot, aerial masts and machine gun barrels, what’s left? Something bleedin' obvious. Can you guess?
    7 points
  35. More progress on the Blue Meanie, The interior tub got darkened down a tad to bring the detailing out a bit more. Once dry enough it can get a coat of satin clear as a final finish. A bit of detailing will follow soon after that. The door cards need a chrome trim added and I'm having a think about that one. Dash needs detailing and maybe a pair of Drag slicks in the back. I've tried a couple and they fit OK. They look a lot better than the fold down back seat provided. Then things got serious. The body has been taped up and a great big racing stripe added. I like the look a lot. I'm less happy about the edges of the stripes. There's a bit of bleed and rough edges showing. I'll see what can be done to cure that once things have hardened. I'm not panicking yet. Well, maybe a bit.
    7 points
  36. In advance of starting my 17 Sqn builds I thought I really ought to practice! Lessons learned for anyone in my position: 1. R.T.F.I.!!!! 2. Don’t rush to paint it. 3. Preparation and dry fitting is key 4. Check where the decals go before attaching external gubbins - sometimes these need to go on top of the decal 5. Don’t be scared. It’s plastic. It will take a bit of mucking about!
    7 points
  37. Back to my boat, and back to the truck – or rather, the gun. I drybrushed the grey bits (very carefully) with the base light grey colour. I find Vallejo’s air-colour paints actually drybrush really well, as long as they’re left to dry out slightly before attacking the model. This did a good job of calming down the chipping and oil washes I’d applied earlier. The black parts got a drybrushing of anthracite, followed with a dusting of graphite dust and a quick swipe with a brass/gold Sharpie for a vertical bar that appeared from photos to be brass. The final touch was to glue the (genuine brass) barrel in place. I’m really pleased with how this has turned out – hopefully the rest of the truck won’t let the side down.
    7 points
  38. For weathering the underside/sides I've brought out my cheap, cheerful and seldom used airbrush. In fact this is the first time I've ever used it on anything other than practice. It runs off a can of compressed air and is the bottle type. It's a bit spattery but in this circumstance that's no issue. The paint is Tamiya Acrylic Flat Earth thinned down quite a bit. Once dried, on top of that and as shown in the two images below is a coat of My Hobby Flat Matt from a rattle can - by far the best matting agent I've found. There will be a tiny bit more weathering to come by a different method, but not a lot, it'll be just sufficient to make the car look heavy and grounded. Rear lights by marker pen.
    7 points
  39. Something Architectural (the final chapter) Build thread
    7 points
  40. Thanks karly. Hows yours doing? The vehicle is now officially finished and it was on to the accessories. A few packs of sterilizer, a bottle of something, the testing kit and the waders. They all need painting and are dry fitted for now. I've changed the original placement of the test kit. Originally it was going to be on a plank sitting on the rear fender but since most of these seem to have had an additional storage box fixed there I'm putting it on the bonnet. I think I've got a better galvanised effect on the hatch and a neater rubber gasket I think. The water effect is a bit rough but hopefully will look ok. The tissue decided to stick to the Kristal coating First set of stuff. I've got a few more to do yet! (The open tin is filled with Kristal fluid which was still wet. It will be coated with white pigment to represent the powder.) The cups where difficult to do. I wanted them more flared. I tried pushing the copper pipe over a tapered rod but it doesn't seem to have done much. Next set of stuff is the pipes and filters that go into the water. Cheers all Andrew
    7 points
  41. The Magna Models resin Gloster F5/34: This kit has been in my stash a long time and I’m pleased to see it finally built! It’s a short run resin kit and has some issues, but it scrubs up nicely enough. Build thread is here if you are interested. Thanks for looking, Adrian
    7 points
  42. Here's my RusAir resin 1/144 Antonov An-10A Cat. Build thread is here thanks for looking Julian
    7 points
  43. Hi all, here some pics of the "new" Italeri MB-326 in 1:48 scale. In fact it is the almost 40 years old kit by Esci. Nevertheless a fine model with great panel lines but poor cockpit details. So I changed this to a Neomega resin cockpit, the rest including the fine deacls are OOB.
    6 points
  44. Hi all, calling this done, I added some scratch built high voltage capacitors with some colour changing SMD lighting. Maybe this will bring a bit of a spark to the monster's bride! Happy modelling! Just for fun I've uploaded a cheesy video!
    6 points
  45. Hi folks, this is yet another night fighter kit I built this year. Basically, the Hasegawa kit OOB with few extras (OWL decals, AML nose, Airone Hobby fabric masks) and couple of scratch built items (opened canopy and front entry hatch). The MM 850 served with 68.squadron, where its 'B' flight was formed of Czechoslovak airmen. On the night 7th October 1943 the crew P/O Šerhant / F/Sgt Nečas shot down a Do 217 off Yarmouth, while the other crew damaged a Ju 88 few months earlier. Cheers Libor
    6 points
  46. Here’s a recent build I did to take a break from 1/25 cars and to get into a P-38 mood before indulging in the sublime Tamiya P-38F kit in my stash. This is from the Eduards “Pacific Lightenings” kit from 2013 based on the Academy kit and which also included resin cockpit/ wheels/ misc parts, masks and very nice set of Cartograph decals. I used various Alclad metal lacquers over a black enamel base for the external surfaces and Tamiya acrylics for the cockpit and wheel bays. This Academy kit proved a little fussier than a previous one I recall doing about 10 years ago (maybe I’m a fussier builder in my older age?). I may still add a little smoke and weathering but thought I’d stop for now with it looking like an air show hanger queen. The original was flown by Lt. Richard L. West, 35th FS, 8th FG, Owi (island off coast of Papau) July 1944. He bagged two in this and six in his previous P-40. Amazing to me that they could keep these things flying on and off those hot sandy wet muddy bug-infested islands....amazing heroic days in aviation history. I’m looking forward to doing the Tamiya kit and hopefully experiencing a little more fun and a little less drama. Not perfect but good enough for me these days at a meter or two! Cheers, John
    6 points
  47. Time for the wings - the early F6F-3's in the above reference pics had fairings over the wing guns. The kit comes with fairings for the inboard guns, since it's originally a night fighter, but I had to scratch fairings for the middle barrels. The fairings are made from some smaller diameter sprue. In addition, the trailing edge of the flap is very thick, with a seam down the middle. I tried to thin down interior, but it just made the gap wider! I ended up sanding down the trailing edge and gluing on some plasticard, then sanding that down. OK, back to the gun fairings: I didn't attempt to thin down the inside of the other wing, and I was able to do a little sanding afterwards. The cowling is almost ready to be fitted.
    6 points
  48. N gauge (close to 1:144) pillboxes. A bit of fun to throw together..
    6 points
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