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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/11/2021 in all areas

  1. Wrapped up the 1/48 Super etendard. A nice kit, some minor fit issues but overall very impressive and much better than the Jaguar. The dark grey is Model Master and the light grey is a Tamiya home brew. Both acrylic.
    35 points
  2. Hallo all! My name is Luca and i'm new here. here some pics of my new built and first post here, the Airfix Hunter F.6 in 1:48 converted to a Mk58. I've add some Eduard PE`s, pitot by Master, flaps by A.M.U.R. Reaver and decals by McOne "Late Swiss Hunter". Hope you enjoy! Cheers from Switzerland. Luca
    35 points
  3. Good morning. I finished the construction of a B17F Revell whose assembly is here: This is my latest diorama, which is also a bit of a way to remember all the airmen who have been shot down. This B17 bomber was shot down on February 21, 1944. His pilot belly landed his plane because he was injured, his co-pilot and upper turret gunner KIA, two engines out , a destroyed oxygen system and a ragged rudder (among other battle damage!). The victorious hunter, Heinrich "Heinz" Bär, came the next day with other pilots to inspect the wreckage. A Propaganda Staffel team was also there to film the scene. Figs are Preiser's ones. I dressed the Germans with paper coats The pilots came in a Kubelwagen (Italeri): and the kriegberichter in a Kfz15 Horsch (ACE) The German pilots unpacked the rescue kit consisting of a dinghy: I made this raft with paper tubes, which I covered with Mister Surfacer and which I painted in Humbrol Matt24: I crushed the paper dinghy to make it look deflated To furnish the boat, I made the "Gibson Girl": This radio transmitter is so called because of its shapes, of course! Some battle damages: I like the funny details: The Luftwaffe technicians thought they could recover the wreckage, but a flight of P51 strafed it. The unfortunate Miss Ouachita found herself in aluminum ingots to supply the German factories. Here is a new B17 in my collection. Well, I think that I will run out of space soon!: Thanks for watching. Regards from France, Eric-Snafu35
    34 points
  4. G'day all. It's been a while since a completion. It just so happens I reduced the stash by one this afternoon. This is the lovely 1/72 Airfix S2C Buccaneer. It's a great kit to build with only two real gripes. I found that the inserts for the exhausts at the rear fuselage required some material removal as did a small amount at the nose to fuselage join. Other than that she's in the display cabinet safely. Kit decals used as XV336 while with 800 NAS on HMS Eagle in June 1971. I opted for the folded wings and deployed airbrake not so much as a space saver, but because I think its an airframe that doesn't look too bad like this. Keen to hear you thoughts. Cheers, Mick
    31 points
  5. Hasegawa's 1:48th scale Phantom FGR.2 I added a cockpit set from Aires, seamless intakes from Alley Cat and after market decals from Model Alliance to make a 14Squadron machine based at RAF Bruggen in 1970. A fairly straightforward build. Cutting & grinding needed to fit the cockpit & intakes, but noting too difficult. Painted with Xtracolor enamels & Mr Color acrylics. Thanks for looking Angelo.
    25 points
  6. Hi all, here some pics of the "new" Italeri MB-326 in 1:48 scale. In fact it is the almost 40 years old kit by Esci. Nevertheless a fine model with great panel lines but poor cockpit details. So I changed this to a Neomega resin cockpit, the rest including the fine deacls are OOB.
    24 points
  7. Hi everyone i've just finish this helicopter. The kit was very fit and detail, Especially the interior (It's a pity that it was all covered up) Thanks for watching !
    24 points
  8. Here are some pictures of my HpH Models Messerschmitt ME 410 in 1/32nd scale. It is a multi-media mainly resin kit, it is not Tamiya and I didn't expect it to be. From a cottage industry limited run kit a little trimming, sanding, head-scratching is to be expected but I loved every minute of building. The kit is on the expensive side but looking at the end result it is worth every penny! The surface detail is superb! Thanks for checking in! Peter
    23 points
  9. Hello everybody! Test build of the model. I hope you will like it.
    22 points
  10. first order of the day, pigeon post You're gonna need a bigger coat. Thanks AW It's not the height that's the issue Pete, it's the width at the base - and that's just too difficult a job to even contemplate Primer now de-primed Giorgio, but the greebles are multiplying oh, you are a card Crisp. Actually, I much prefer the tropical nose fit on the WW as I think it makes it look less Vietnam'ish t'would be exceptional if it stayed together. Read on SD Thanks Colin, appreciated. Hend Vs Greeblies is about 50/50 at the moment. Slowly but surely they are succumbing to my manly charms thanks Hitc. I may revisit it but not anytime soon, and I think the paint will do a fine job of disguising my work anyway. Certainly Martian. Here you go... oh.... you said please . Oops! thanks Trevor. It won't win any prizes but I don't think there's too many WW HAR10's in 1/48 kicking about, so I'm happy. Good idea Johnny, here you go... Oh... you said permission. Oops! Pigeons fed, watered, and released. Time to move on to more pressing matters. BTW, anyone notice Postimage acting up today? The images I just uploaded about half an hour ago are showing up, but none of my previous images are available. I trust they will get their act together soon. As I bid my farewell in last weeks episode I had begun the ancient ritual of greebling. It was so much fun, I decided to carry on and see what greeblies would deign to make an appearance this time around. This was quite the fun part - as I had removed most of the detail in my sanding/grinding/blasting efforts I had to put some thought as to how to reinstate the many protuberances of the WW. Vents are always fun. Thankfully I have a simple method of producing said greebles. I'm a very lazy modeler, and that laziness means I have to put some hard thought into how to produce bits n bobs in an effort to avoid, well... effort. This is the lazy modelers guide to Not-Vac-forming. It's as easy as it gets - Choose something metal that's the general shape of the vent in question - in this instance I had an old piece of piano wire kicking around in the drawer. It was stuck into the gas torch flame and after a few seconds it glowed red. Next bit was even easier - I just dropped it on the workbench, dropped a scrap of styrene sheet on top and then pressed the styrene around the wire with a pair of tweezers. In a minute or so I had a bunch of little vent shaped lumps. Don't try and pull the wire out too soon or the plastic will just deform - 10 seconds wait or so worked for this lot. Once I had a selection of vents, I chose the best two, trimmed them back and they ended up adorning the spine of the WW. Looking at the tail pylon, it seemed a little bland and needed something to kick it up a notch. After studying the reference pics, I decided that scribing panel lines were not the answer. Sure there are panel lines on the 1:1, but it's all very smooth, and since I am the master of useless when it comes to scribing panel lines I thought I'd try a different approach - aluminum tape. I figured that even .2mm styrene sheet would be too thick to represent the panels and reinforcement strip, but the al tape is much thinner and I thought it was worth a try. I have no idea of this is going to work or not, so stay tuned. I may even try adding rivets (pin pricks) to the tape - If I can convince myself I can do it neatly Another spar was added behind the cockpit, and I tried to represent the maintenance hatch - originally I tried with the aluminum tape but it was too thick and wouldn't conform enough to the various shape changes required so I went with BMF. Back in my Lysander build I used BMF to represent rib tape on the tail surfaces and it showed up quite well under paint so if luck is with me, this "hatch" will show up under paint but without looking too intrusive. At the bottom of the hatch I glued a length of .2mm wire before I applied the BMF to act as the hinge - seen to better effect in this shot. I think I may run a knife blade along that top edge of the wire to make a cleaner edge Then it was back to venting No, not that type of venting - this type of venting! The lazy modelers vent system again. This time I noticed a rather uniquely shaped vent just fwd of the tail boom so I used a piece of brass rod and filed the end round. Then the SIHRSC (aka the Fyle) was used to form an angled flat.... oh, it's much easier if you just look at the picture y'know. Heat. Drop. Drop. Squeeze. Cut. Trim dah de dah de dah Which gave me this sharply tapered vent. (I also drilled a hole in the fuselage before adding the vent) More greebles were thrown at the WW, this time in the shape of strengthening panels/brackets made once again from aluminum tape. I've noticed that different HAR10's appear to have these panels in different geometries. Some appear to be plain rectangular panels while some are this truncated diamond shape. Have I mentioned how weird this plastic is? You can still clearly see all the rivet lines and other features such as panels and vents showing up, yet that aluminum tape is burnished down flat on top and you can see that there are no rivets showing through the tape. It makes it very difficult to know when you have completely removed/flattened the detail The mysterious box was hung on the underside during a what should I do next intermission Yet more vents. A scrap of brass was brought into play here and filed to the requisite shape. For some reason I've never kept any of the previous vent-formers I've made. This time I'm keeping them all to save myself all this hard work in future That former produced the small vent in the center of this pic. Other greeblies making an appearance here are aluminum tape masquerading as various panels. Plasticard acting as a door stop on the door rail and the lamp mounting base above the door rail. A piece of shaped runner steps in as the nav light base, and a brass donut (from the F2b PE fret?) standing in as a static vent surround Port side is very similar though not identical At this point I think I have applied all the greeblies aft of the cabin area. There's still a bunch of greeblies to add in that area, but until I've figured out what to do with the windows and rubbers, I'm not sure if I want to touch this area in case whatever plan I come up with requires sanding and more destroying of plastic. So I moved to the front end and attacked one of the jobs I was not looking forward to - the exhaust opening. Lots of measuring three and four times and checking my references until it was time to either do it or pack up for the day - so out came the step drills - after I had drilled a plot hole of course. I measured the exhaust diameter to be around 9mm or so based on the drawing. Thankfully, step drills normally come in sets of three because at 9mm diameter on this particular bit, the smallest diameter would be cutting through the stbd side. Once I had opened the hole up enough I just switched to one of the other step drills. One of the things I like about these tools is that there is a good length between each diameter increase - this guides the drill and prevents you from wandering, or making eccentric holes. All turned by hand which makes them very controllable Like so. Time was getting on and I needed some excitement - all this work had started to get a bit boring, so it was time for a quick dry fit to see where I had got to. Undercarriage slotted in Of course I broke the solder joint while faffing about with the stbd undercarriage leg, though to be honest, I am not sure if I am going to bother to try to repair it. Once the legs are in location, they are very solid so I think I'll just add a dab of cyano gel once it's fitted and leave it at that. You can't even see the break in this photo, and the joint is going to be behind the mainwheel anyway. A sloppy approach I know, but sometimes life is just too short. The last task for today was to do some more work on the rotor head. During the week I had turned three bearing housings/grease points on the lathe. I left a 1mm shaft on each which fitted through the casting and will provide a fixing for the rotor blades when I ever get around to figuring out how to make those. The three housings were soldered onto the top casting This shot provides a better view and will give you an idea of how I intend to mount the blades. Once I've figured the blades out, I'll be able to trim those three shafts to length I also turned a brass swash plate (still got plenty to do on that ) and a vaguely MRGB shaped thingy from aluminum rod (mainly because I was bored and it was very easy to do). As per SOP, it is nigh on impossible to actually see the gearbox on a WW once the rotor head gubbinses are fitted Now someone and sorry I can't remember who, asked if I would ever consider using the kit rotor head. Ehrrrrrr.... kit effort on the left, and my still-in-process attempt at a rotor head on the right (I did get that right didn't I?) Does that answer the question ? I can't be too hard on the kit though - remember, this was tooled back in the early 50's, before CNC was common, and when expectations of modeling kits was completely different. This kit was probably the envy of most kids back in the day. It very likely stood up well for a few decades. Dinner time now. Next episode... ehrrr.... not quite sure yet
    21 points
  11. Here is my completed Pavehawk build. Over all, a very enjoyable build. The 1/35 Kitty Hawk helicopter range have a good reputation for build quality, it's just the awful KH instructions you have to work around. Here is the WIP thread for the build. I wanted to build something different. I do like the US special ops helicopters, they have a particular "beefy" look to them. When KH launched their 1/35th Hawk family of helicopters, I thought I'd go big. Normally I like to depict an aircraft in a realistic state. If it is armed, or has crew in, I don't open up many panels. This would not be the case on the 1:1 version. But with this, the detail available around the engines or avionics bays would be criminal to hide, but I really wanted to include the fantastic crew figures from Live-Resin. So I broke my own rules to display it as is. The only aftermarket bits I added were weighted resin wheel from Armory, Live_Resin crew figures and GAU-18 .5 cal guns, plus Werners Wings decals. A large amount of scratch building went into the cabin roof, to improve that. I wanted to do a 56th RQS aircraft when they were based at RAF Lakenheath. This HH-60G has a memorial to the crew of "Jolly 22", lost in a crash January 2014 at Cley Next The Sea, North Norfolk. It's on the cockpit roof above the centre windscreen panel. A very poignant memory for me, as we liked to visit Cley, when living in Norfolk. It is painted in acrylics. Main fuselage is Mr Hobby aqueous H305 Gunship Grey FS36118. Cabin interior Mr Hobby aqueous H308 Light Ghost Grey FS36375. The black is mostly Tamiya XF69 NATO black. Thanks for looking. Rob.
    16 points
  12. Another great kit. I would gladly build another, if I could get my hands on one. Glad to finish this one though as the decals are brilliant but fought be all the way.
    16 points
  13. Here's my RusAir resin Antonov An-10A. Possibly the best quality resin kit I've built (not that I've built that many), build thread is here. thanks for looking Julian
    15 points
  14. Fresh from the Less Than A Tenner GB: I haven't been spending much time with the kits of late what with my existential crisis and the fact that I've been out and about a fair bit, but I've finally managed to drag this one over the line. It's the Airfix 1/72 Curtiss P-40B Warhawk, picked up from Amazon for the princely sum of £6.99 delivered, built entirely out of the box with the addition of a bit of Uschi thread for the antenna wires (which I'm pretty sure hasn't bumped it over the tenner!) It's a lovely little kit, builds like Lego. The sharp-eyes will not that the underwing roundel is slightly wonky and again on the underside I made bit of a mess of the port navigation light, but I can live with these, otherwise one of my better efforts, I didn't make an absolute hash of the canopy! As usual close-up photography is brutal but it sails through the three feet test! Brief and unremarkable WIP here if you're interested. Thanks for looking in!
    14 points
  15. hello ! I have just finished this amazing model . there's still a few details missing : beer bottles and the flag of course. I will update the gallery as soon as I have those added. here it is , I hope you like.
    13 points
  16. Remarkably, 2021 marks the 10th anniversary of the Scottish Aviation Jetstream leaving UK military service after the last T.2s of 750 NAS were retired in March 2011. Even more surprising is the range of AModel kits in 1/72 that have been produced in recent years, allowing numerous variants of the type to be built by modellers, as well as the return of the venerable 1960s era Airfix kit. And with new decal sheets on the way from both Model Art and Xtradecal, the time seemed right for a photo review of the Jetstream’s career with both the RAF and FAA. The Jetstream was the swansong of Handley Page Ltd, one of the last of the independent British aircraft manufacturers. Originally seen as the saviour of the company, this potentially world class aircraft resulted in its demise due to spiralling costs. Cancelled orders from both RAF and USAF together with the fact that the company refused to become part of the conglomerates of BAC or Hawker Siddeley, meant that Handley Page went into liquidation in 1969. In 1971 a company was formed at Sywell to continue production of the Jetstream - appropriately called Jetstream Aircraft Ltd - but this lasted only briefly. The design and production rights were then acquired by Scottish Aviation Ltd (SAL), who produced an initial 26 machines that had been subsequently ordered by the RAF on 24 February 1972 to replace the ageing Vickers Varsity in the multi-engine pilot training role. SAL had 15 sets of completed wings with seven more in assembly. The tail units were already under sub-contract to North-West Industries of Canada. Three Handley Page fuselages were completed and a further eleven were in storage. In addition, seven fuselages were partly completed which left SAL needing five more to complete the MOD contract. After looking for a sub contractor to compete the work, SAL decided to set up their own production line for these fuselages and they completed the contract, the last RAF Jetstream T.1 - XX500 being flown in December 1976. Compared to the civil version, the military Jetstream was fitted with the more powerful Turbomeca Astazou XVID engines. However, the type had an inauspicious start to its early RAF career as a series of Defence White Papers in the mid 70s led to drastic reductions in the Service’s strategic and tactical transport fleets and consequently a temporary cessation to multi engine pilot training requirements. Four early production Jetstream T.1s s were delivered to the CFS at RAF Little Rissington in late 1973 to allow for the training of type qualified QFIs (XX476/30, XX477/-, XX478/32 and XX480/33). A further seven went to 5 FTS at RAF Oakington by mid-1974 (XX479, XX481-XX486). However, these assignments were brief as Oakington was slated for closure, and 5 FTS itself disbanded on October 10th 1974. The ex 5 FTS machines transferred over to Little Rissington ahead of that station also closing; the 11 aircraft then already in service were placed in storage at 19 MU RAF St Athan pending a decision on their fate. The remaining aircraft from the 26 on order also went directly to St Athan except for XX488 which became the SAL company prototype T.2 for the RN. After reassessing its needs, RAF multi-engine training recommenced in November 1976 with the Multi Engine Training School (METS) being formed at RAF Leeming as a component of 3 FTS. The eight aircraft complement was made up of XX492, and XX494-XX500, all new build airframes coded 70 through 77 respectively. At the same time, the RAF had concluded that fourteen of its recent acquisitions were now surplus to requirements (a further airframe, XX477, had been lost in an accident at Little Rissington in 1974 following a fuel feed problem which led to the loss of both engines). These were offered to the RN to replace its ageing Sea Prince fleet, used for Observer training purposes. To make them fit for purpose, some modification was required, most notably the installation of the MEL E190 weather and terrain-mapping radar in a modified radome, and the fitting of consoles in the cabin for the students. In the process the Jetstream T.2 "Flying Classroom" had been born. METS tenure at RAF Leeming was relatively short as on April 30 1979, the squadron relocated to RAF Finningley where it was absorbed within 6 FTS. Upon transfer, the aircraft lost their two digit identification codes to become A to H respectively. Also, the unit complement increased by two with the arrival of XX482 from store at St Athan as ‘78’ (which became ‘J’ on transfer); and XX491, which had been returned to SAL for trials, was delivered as ‘79’ before finally becoming ‘K’. The fleet was increased by one further aircraft on May 11 1979 with the arrival of XX493; this became ‘L’ completing the establishment of 11 aircraft which were retained until near the end of RAF service. On 1 July 1992, METS took on the number plate of 45 Reserve Sqn from previous incumbent the TWCU which in turn had become 15 Reserve Sqn. In 1995 the unit was on the move again, and on 31 August began relocating to RAF Cranwell where once again it became part of 3 FTS. While at Cranwell, XX492/A was the only Jetstream on the unit to receive the RAF College light blue fuselage band. March 17 2004 represented the beginning of the end for UK military operation of the Jetstream when 45(R) Sqn at RAF Cranwell replaced its aircraft with much newer Serco owned Beech King Air 200s. With age had come a lack of reliability and the fleet simply wasn't able to achieve the required 5400 hours per year to allow the courses to be completed. This in turn had created a need for some of the flying hours to be contracted out hence the earlier than planned arrival of the King Air. Back to the Jetstream’s career in the Senior Service. Deliveries of the former RAF T.1s to the FAA began in October 1978, but it was September 1984 before all 14 converted T.2 aircraft had been received by 750 NAS at RNAS Culdrose. Due to an expanding requirement for Observers, a further two Jetstream 2 series airframes were sourced from the civilian market. F-BTMI which became ZA110 and 9Q-CTC which became ZA111. Their first flights with military identities came in July and December of 1981. Unlike their red, white and light aircraft grey painted brethren, these two were delivered in the blue and white colours that the whole fleet would wear until retirement. The Royal Navy placed an order for four brand new Jetstream 31 aircraft in 1985, to augment its fleet of T.2s. Deliveries of ZE438-441 took place in 1986 and this more modern variant gained the T.3 designation, giving 750 NAS a total complement of 20 airframes. For their intended role the T.3s were equipped with a Doppler fed Tactical Air Navigation System (TANS) and the Racal ASR360 multi-mode radar, the antenna for which was located in a large fairing underneath the fuselage. After being operated by 750 NAS in the communications role for a while, the aircraft were moved to RNAS Yeovilton to replace the ageing Herons of Flag Officer Naval Air (FONA)/Heron Flight. 750 NAS suffered its own tragic loss of an aircraft at Portland in 1989. XX489 was displaying at a Cadet Day on May 8th when it stalled during a wingover and fell into the sea, killing both pilots. In 1996 XX475, which was one of the aircraft offered to and converted for Royal Navy use, passed into the hands of the Defence Test Evaluation Organisation (DTEO) and later the Defence Evaluation Research Agency (DERA) at West Freugh. As with almost all the test aircraft from that era, it was repainted into the trademark 'raspberry ripple' colour scheme with bold titles. XX485 and XX490 were delivered to the Uruguayan Navy as A-875 and A-876 in December 1998 having been deemed to be surplus to the Royal Navy's requirements. Both have subsequently been withdrawn from service by their new owners. In July 2008 it was announced that the Jetstreams of 750 NAS were to be replaced by a Cobham FR Aviation subsidiary supplied, modified and maintained fleet of new Beechcraft King Air 350ERs. Heron Flight and the T.3 followed the RAF's T.1s into the history books on September 29th 2008 with three aircraft initially going into storage at RAF Cranwell and the other to RAF Shawbury. And so to March 2011 and the Jetstream's UK military swansong. With the final Jetstream 32 week / 70 flying hour Basic Observer's Course ending on 7th March, it just remained for 750 NAS to prepare to bid farewell to the type at the end of that month. Since retirement from active military service, it is perhaps surprising how many complete Jetstreams have been preserved at home or abroad. No less than four former RAF T.1s are on display at museums in the UK: XX492 at Newark, XX494 at East Midlands Aeropark, XX495 at the South Yorks Air Museum and XX496 at the RAFM Cosford. This perhaps demonstrates the significance of this elegant but perhaps rather under appreciated type in UK military service history. Firstly here's a list of all Jetstreams in UK military service, their useage and eventual fates. A 1977 view of Jetstream T.1 XX478 while in storage, awaiting conversion to a T.2 variant for the FAA. This aircraft has had its tail code removed but was previously ‘32’ with the CFS. XX491/K of 6FTS/METS RAF Finningley seen here at RNAS Culdrose Air Day in July 1991. XX494/B on static display at the RAF Alconbury Air Fete on 23 August 1992. Note that the aircraft is by now wearing the 45(R) Sqn fin stripe and unit badge following METS becoming a Reserve Squadron on 1 July that year. A 1998 view of XX492/A of 3 FTS/45(R) Sqn seen outside the squadron’s HQ at RAF Cranwell. This machine was the only Jetstream assigned to 3 FTS to receive the famous RAF College blue fuselage band. XX493/L of 3 FTS/45(R)Sqn photographed prior to departing RAF Waddington in July 2003. Shortly prior to the Jetstream’s retirement from RAF service in March 2004, 45(R) Sqn facilitated a media flight from which these three air-to- air photos were obtained. Seen here is XX497/E. XX497/E in company with XX492/A (photo courtesy Peter Foster via Chris Cannon). XX500/H banking over the Lincolnshire countryside. After retirement XX496/D was transferred to the RAF Museum collection at Cosford. Another ex RAF Jetstream to be preserved is XX495/C, currently part of the South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum at Doncaster where it was seen in Feb 2020. 750 NAS of the FAA became the largest military operator of the Jetstream initially receiving 14 former RAF T.1s that had been converted into Mk T.2 flying classrooms. The aircraft retained their former RAF Training Command red/white/light grey scheme upon transfer but were later repainted in more appropriate blue/white/grey livery. This photo taken at the Newbury Air Festival in May 1980 shows T.2 XX488/CU 571 in the original colours but with RN titling and red/white propellers. An undated view of T.2 XX489/CU 575. This example was lost while displaying on 8 May 1989 over Portland Harbour, Dorset with the tragic loss of both crew. Two images of T.2 XX481/CU 560 of 750 NAS seen displaying at RIAT in July 2006. T.2 XX476 CU/561 touching down at RIAT 2009 at RAF Fairford. T.2 XX478 CU/564 also captured at RIAT 2009. Note the 100 years of Naval Aviation markings on the rear fuselage and fin. T.2 XX488 CU/562 photographed at an RAF Northolt photocall in June 2009. T.2 ZA111 CU/565 was one of two later acquisitions for the FAA 750 NAS, along with sister aircraft ZA110, required to meet an uplift in RN Observer training requirements. It is seen here at RIAT in 2009. ZE438/576, one of four T.3 variants procured for the RN. Initially delivered to 750 NAS for observer training, it was later reassigned to FONAC/Heron Flight at RNAS Yeovilton in a Communications/light transport role, replacing their elderly Sea Herons. Seen here at Wittering in February 2002. T.3 ZE439/577 on static display at RNAS Yeovilton in July 2000. Note the large under fuselage fairing, a distinguishing feature of this variant. XX475. The first prototype UK military Jetstream that served with the RAF as a T.1 before conversion to a T.2 for the RN, and then in 1996, was assigned to the MOD test fleet at DERA/DTEO West Freugh. Hope this has been of interest. Thanks for looking Mark
    12 points
  17. Although I've built 3 Revell Tornados this is the second successfull build as it's been sitting waiting to be completed. It's Eduards Desert Babe kit which I was lucky to have ordered early on the first run. Wasn't sure what weapons fit to go with and ended up going for 4 x 1000lb bombs from Reskit. Also added AIM-9's from AMK's weapons kit and a Master Pitot probe. Finished with MRP Desert Pink.
    11 points
  18. Hiya Folks, Yes I know,.... another Beaufort,..... but it is a special one,........ and this model is dedicated to all of the heroic men who flew Beaufort`s during WW2. In late March 1941 two German capital ships, the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau, arrived at the French port of Brest. The RAF mounted a large number of bombing raids against the heavily defended harbour but neither warship was hit, although one unexploded bomb landed in the dry dock housing the Gneisenau causing it to be removed and re-berthed in a more exposed position where there was just enough open water available between the vessel and the internal mole 500 yds away to carry out a very dangerous torpedo attack. This vulnerability was spotted by a photo-reconnaissance Spitfire on the 5th April and orders were immediately issued for an attack to be carried out the following morning before the Gneisenau could be moved . 22 Sqn with its Beaufort torpedo bombers was regarded as something of an `elite' within the expanding Beaufort force and it was briefed to carry out the torpedo element of a combined bombing and torpedo attack from St. Eval in Cornwall on 6th April 1941. Three torpedo-armed Beauforts flown by Flying Officer Kenneth Campbell, Flying Officer J Hyde DFC and Sergeant H Camp were detailed for what was regarded by many as a `suicide mission' and they took off at 0420 hrs on 6th April despite the weather being extremely poor. Flying Beaufort Mk.I, N1016, OA-X from 22 Sqn was; Pilot- Flying Officer Kenneth Campbell VC, RAFVR Observer- Sergeant James Scott DFM, RCAF Radio Operator- Flight Sergeant Ralph Hillman RAFVR Air Gunner- Sergeant William Mulliss RAFVR The crews were to fly individually to an RV point off Brest and then form up ready for their combined dawn assault, but due to the poor weather 23 year old P/O Campbell found that his was the only aircraft to have reached the RV. Knowing just how important it was to hit the Gneisenau before it was moved, he and his crew decided to brave the formidable harbour defences all on their own and attack. Descending to wave top height they ran in towards the target knowing that the only route which would allow a torpedo to run inside the harbour would take them close to shore batteries and make them extremely vulnerable to heavy fire from other ships in the harbour, especially as they were a lone target so low down on the water and without the planned diversion of a bombing raid. Despite the hail of lead that they were subjected to upon reaching the harbour and crossing the mole, the crew expertly lined up and released their torpedo, almost hitting the mast of their target as they pulled away. Usually a Beaufort would drop to ultra low level and jink like mad to make its escape following an attack but unfortunately their only escape was inland over the town of Brest which is ringed by hills, so their only alternative was to bank sharply over the town and head for the sea, but it was while carrying out this vulnerable manoeuvre that the aircraft was raked by flak and machine gun fire from the high ground. Reports say that hits tore along the side of the aircraft, flames streamed from the port engine and the aircraft reared up then dived nose first into the waters of the harbour. The fuel tanks exploded immediately and the aircraft, broken in two, sank to the bottom of the harbour forty feet below with all those aboard losing their lives. As this was taking place their torpedo was still running true and it struck the Gneisenau, blowing a huge hole below the waterline in the vicinity of the rear main battery turret. Some 3,000 long tons of water flooded the ship and caused a 2 degree list to starboard. The flooding also disabled several components of the ship's propulsion system. The explosion caused significant destruction to the side plating as well as the starboard and centerline propeller shafts. The concussive shock also caused widespread damage to the ship's electronic components. A salvage tug came alongside to assist in the pumping effort. Following the attack, Gneisenau returned to the drydock for repairs that would keep the warship in harbour for another six months while repairs were made. It is said that had the Gneisenau not been so near to a dry dock, then it would have sank as the damage was so severe. Three days later, on the night of 9–10 April, RAF bombers dropped around (25 long tons of 227 kg AP bombs on the ship, four of which hit. All four hit the starboard side of the forward superstructure. Two of the bombs exploded on the main armor deck while the other two failed to detonate. The attack killed 72 of the crew and wounded 90, of whom 16 later died of their injuries. The bombs slightly damaged the main armor deck and caused some structural damage on the starboard side. It was decided to make alterations to the ship while she was dry docked for repairs; these included the installation of fourteen additional 2 cm anti-aircraft guns and six 53.3 cm torpedo tubes amidships. The aircraft hangar was rearranged, and the catapult that had been mounted on top of it was removed. The length of repairs and modifications precluded participation in the sortie by the new battleship Bismarck in May 1941 and even eight months later the starboard propeller shaft was still under repair.. The RAF continued to attack the ship in dry dock, though no further damage was done. On 6 February 1942, a bomb fell close to Gneisenau, but caused no damage and at 2300hs on 11 February 1942 the Gneisenau, Scharnhorst, and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen began to return to Germany via the English Channel during Operation Cerberus, known to the British as The Channel Dash. The intention being to deploy the vessels to Norway to interdict Allied convoys to the Soviet Union. This photo depicts the extent of the flak defences over Brest and was taken in January 1942; The selfless, lone attack by Campbell`s crew may have gone unheralded were it not for the French resistance sending a report to London which although it took some time to arrive, detailed the heroic attack and the level of damage inflicted upon the warship. The Germans recovered the bodies from the wreckage of the Beaufort and buried them with full military honours at Brest (Kerfautras) Cemetery near to Saint-Martin-des-Champs. For displaying valour in the face of extreme peril and without regard for his own safety, Scotsman Flying Officer Kenneth Campbell was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, although the remainder of his crew received nothing,...... his citation reading; Air Ministry, 13th March, 1942. The KING has been graciously pleased to confer the VICTORIA CROSS on the undermentioned officer in recognition of most conspicuous bravery:— Flying Officer Kenneth CAMPBELL (72446), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (deceased), No. 22 Squadron. This officer was the pilot of a Beaufort aircraft of Coastal Command which was detailed to attack an enemy battle cruiser in Brest Harbour at first light on the morning of 6th April 1941. The aircraft did not return but it is known that a torpedo attack was carried out with the utmost daring. The battle cruiser was secured alongside the wall on the north shore of the harbour, protected by a stone mole bending around it from the west. On rising ground behind the ship stood protective batteries of guns. Other batteries were clustered thickly round the two arms of land which encircle the outer harbour. In this outer harbour near the mole were moored three heavily armed anti-aircraft ships, guarding the battle cruiser. Even if an aircraft succeeded in penetrating these formidable defences, it would be almost impossible, after delivering a low-level attack, to avoid crashing into the rising ground beyond. This was well known to Flying Officer Campbell who, despising the heavy odds, went cheerfully and resolutely to the task. He ran the gauntlet of the defences. Coming in at almost sea level, he passed the anti-aircraft ships at less than mast-height in the very mouths of their guns and skimming over the mole launched a torpedo at point-blank range. The battle cruiser was severely damaged below the water-line and was obliged to return to the dock whence she had come only the day before. By pressing home his attack at close quarters in the face of withering fire on a course fraught with extreme peril, Flying Officer Campbell displayed valour of the highest order. The RAF named their original VC10 transport`s after Victoria Cross holders and XR808 of 10 Sqn was named after Kenneth Campbell. 22 Sqn also named one of its Sea King`s after Campbell too; The crew; -Kenneth Campbell was born in Ayrshire on April 21, 1917 and educated at Sedbergh School. He left to study Chemistry at Cambridge in 1935 where he learned to fly with the Cambridge University Air Squadron. At the outbreak of war in September 1939 he was mobilised for service and after further training became a Flying Officer and was posted to 22 Sqn in September 1940, flying the Bristol Beaufort torpedo bomber. His first victory came in March 1941 when he successfully torpedoed a merchant vessel near Borkum in Northern Germany but just days later his aircraft was badly damaged by a pair of Messerschmitt Bf110`s. Despite extensive damage to his aircraft he landed safely and two days later he torpedoed another vessel, off Ijmuiden in the Netherlands during a ‘Rover’ patrol. He was posthumously awarded the VC for his attack on the Gneisenau in Brest harbour on 6th April 1941. - James `Jimmy' P Scott, from Toronto, Canada went to the Northern Vocational School from where he volunteered for the RCAF, to become one of the first pupils of the Commonwealth Air Training Plan, qualifying as a Navigator. Upon arrival in the UK he attended a tea party at Windsor Castle with the Queen and Princsses,..... he went on to complete a number of operations over the North Sea with 22 Sqn. in Beaufort`s and he was still only 19 when he died and it is said that when his body was found it looked as if he was trying to take over the controls of the Beaufort, possibly after Campbell was hit? -Ralph Walter Hillman was born in Edmonton, London in 1918 but he never knew his father Walter as he was killed on 9th October 1917 while returning to France as a soldier of the Gloucestershire Regiment when his ship struck a mine. His name is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial. in 1935 Ralph went to work in the accounts department of the Kodak company in Kingsway, London, but he joined the RAF in May 1939 as ground crew, but later re mustered as Aircrew to become a WOP/AG in September 1939. After training he was posted to 22 Sqn which was receiving the first RAF Bristol Beaufort`s, but he was temporarily detached to 235 Sqn flying Blenheim`s on 1st August 1940 and was thus eligible for the Battle of Britain Clasp because he served with them between the 1st and 31st August, after which he returned to 22 Sqn and of course he died during the raid on Brest. Tragically Hillman's mother Grace, who had now lost her husband and son to war, died from stomach cancer later in 1942. No photo unfortunately,... but above is the plot where Campbell`s crew are laid to rest; - William Cecil Muliss of Letchworth, Hertfordshire was married to Ethel Muliss and was 31 years old when he died and is buried in Plot 40. Row 5. Grave 12. at Brest . France. His parents Alice and Henry and his wife Ethel picked this inscription for his headstone "LAY IT AS A FOUNDATION TO BE ALWAYS IN DUTY; NEVER TO QUIT THAT WHATEVER IT BE " Here is my model replicating Beaufort Mk.I, N1016, OA-X of 22 Sqn, as flown by the Campbell crew; Cheers Tony
    11 points
  19. Finished a while ago but only just taken some pictures. I enjoyed this kit. Hmmm, nose wheel could be straighter! This is the fourth build in my RSAF series. Number five and six will go up next...
    11 points
  20. LT-6G Texan Austrian Airforce- Luftstreitkräfte Österreichisches Bundesheer based at Graz Thalerhof, Fliegerhorst Nittner 1963-68 Italeri 1/48 some Eduard PE decals newly re-printed form IPMS Austria, - thanks! they performed fantastic WIP here in the Texan GB that ends tomorrow, June 11 2021 and together with its successor the Saab Safir (wich is rather smaller, bnut has 4 seats!) cheers, thanks for comments Werner
    10 points
  21. THE UNSEEN UNIVERSITY Ankh-Morpork, The Discworld, The Multiverse, L-Space* Terry Pratchett * L-space, short for library-space. Large quantities of books warp space and time around them. The principle of L-space revolves around a seemingly logical equation; it is an extension of the 'Knowledge is Power' equation. BOOKS = KNOWLEDGE = POWER = (FORCE X DISTANCE ÷ TIME).
    10 points
  22. Hi all, this is the Eduard fw 190 a-2. Flown by Oblt. Siegfried Schnell when he was Co of 9./ jg 2. Based at The ville. France 1942. The kit is Eduard's profipack kit. The markings are supplied in the kit. Masters mg 17 gun barrels and pitot tube have been added also true details resin wheels. Extra Color paints were used for the rlm colours 74, 75, 76.( The rlm 75 from the tin looked to dark so I mixed the 2 parts 75 with 1 part 76.) Badger 200 g was used fitted with a fine tip. Stretched sprue was used for the aerial and head armour support cables Thank you for looking, comments and feed back is welcomed. Nick
    10 points
  23. Thanks for Watching !!!!
    9 points
  24. Three down, one to go. I managed to salvage the damaged tail of this build fairly successfully, though the red tail hides the repair work nicely. Again, no real issues with this build, but I had to peel off one of the coroguard decal because it wrinkled badly overnight. When I tried to lift the decal with Micro Set, a few areas were really well and truly stuck to the wing, and it tore. One thing that I noticed was that the position of the British airways titles don't align correctly - if I align them with the upper windows, they don't align correctly with the doors, but this is a reflection of the kit's accuracy rather than the decals that I used. In the end, I aligned them with the doors. I had one more coroguard decal set (for the upcoming G-BYGC), so I was able to use one of of the upper wing coroguard decals as a replacement, but it means I'll have to buy another set for -GC, or see if I can paint the coroguard on the tops of the wings. Then I can use the remaining coroguard decals for the underside of the wings, which has cutouts for the flap track pylons. This is G-CIVB in the Negus livery from 26 Decals:
    9 points
  25. True fact. For modelling, recuperation, and, oh, maybe drinking. Another true fact. That's always my first advice to folks with lower back pain - try everything else under the sun before you choose surgery. Spinal surgery is like Doom Bar on draught - you can't have just one. And I was taught that the domino theory had something to do with SE Asia. My addled brain is always thinking and planning about what to do next. If I wasn't, I wouldn't have boxes and boxes of aftermarket to go along with boxes and boxes of styrene. ***** Let's play "Now You See It, Soon You Won't." Cobra provided several resin items to detail up the bombardier compartment and these have been installed in the forward fuselage. Not easy to get a photo of though, but I'll give it a shot. First, the bombardier's "cushion" and floor was added followed by the starboard sidewall, which has an oxygen hose, storage case, and some electrical control thingies. The port sidewall also has a bunch of switches and controls. In the center of the floor is the pedestal and Norden bomb sight - I added a small decal to try and represent the cheat sheet book that was stored at the front of the bomb sight. Looking from the back side, you can get a better idea how this stuff goes in. Cobra provide a bulkhead to separate the flight deck and nose gear well from the bombardier station. In reality, there was a crawl way to get up front and above that was the entrance to the forward ERCO turret. This all means that the Cobra bulkhead is fictitious. But I don't care (reason forthcoming) and I installed it anyway. The reason I used the parts as they are is because once the front turret is in place, the only way to see this area is through the lower front window. I tried this with both the kit clear part and the Cobra resin clear part. You can't see squat, let alone diddly. So, as I said now you see it, soon you won't. Next available time slot is scheduled for the installation of the rear bulkhead and nose gear (which has been painted with Hataka Aluminum). Once that is done, the flight deck assembly will slide in and the cockpit sidewalls added last. Then we can move on to some other part of this model. By the way, I've also been cleaning up some of the remaining resin parts in the hope that some airborne resin dust will speed up the fusion of my vertebrae. It looks like there was a LOT of crud in the moulds. All I can do is chip away the crud as best as I can and march forward. If Cobra had still been in business when I bought this set, it would have gone back. Cheers, Bill
    9 points
  26. The Magna Models resin Gloster F5/34: This kit has been in my stash a long time and I’m pleased to see it finally built! It’s a short run resin kit and has some issues, but it scrubs up nicely enough. Build thread is here if you are interested. Thanks for looking, Adrian
    9 points
  27. A busy day so far... The body got a quick sanding with some 2000 grit paper just to remove any little nibs, followed by a couple of mist coats of Tamiya TS58, pearl light blue. A pale light blue with white racing stripes was the plan. The interior tub and seats were also painted with the blue. I like the way many American cars mirror the interior colors with the body. My plan was to scrub in some blue oil paint and then remove nearly all of it with multiple dry brushings, leaving only a faint trace to bring out the kit interior details. That one kind of fell on its face when the oil paint didn't want to come off the way I envisaged. The blue seemed to stain the Tamiya finish, leaving a middle blue. It's not the setback I first thought as the color is pretty nice, if not what I was after! A bigger problem presented itself when I offered up the light blue body. The two finishes didn't go together at all. The paler blue now looked almost grey against the interior tub. Tamiya came to the rescue though, with a few coats of TS54 Light Metallic Blue. That shade was pretty much the same as my interior accident and I'm more than happy to run with it. The two blues are very subtly different but look right. My wheel choice is to run with period ARE (American Racing Mags) with narrow white band tires. Same size front and back. Whiteband tires seem a bit Mums and Dads to me, but just about everything wore them '64-'66 or so. They make a change from redlines I guess. The wheels came from a Revell '32 Ford Coupe kit. They are the Hertz kit tires with some rather old Revell whiteband decals from a '66 Charger kit. Normally I would rather wear someone else's false teeth than try to get old Revell decals to work without falling apart, but these went on without too much drama. Having clear coated them years ago helped I guess. As soon as I offered them up to the body I was more than happy. There's a few subliminal things going on here, the whitebands and the matching interior/exterior color shouts early Promo model to me and the blue is very 60's Shelby without being a direct copy. I'll have to let this lot harden off before continuing, a day or two should do it. I'm on a bit of a Mustang roll at the moment though, so I'll be starting another to run alongside this one. A curbside Hertz car will probably get the nod. More later.
    9 points
  28. I don't usually build cars but, recently my club held a 1/24 car group build challenge. I quickly decided on something different so I chose the ICM 1912 Model-T Commercial Roadster. Before starting I found that ICM also kitted a couple of figures titled 'American Motorists' so I decided to add them to my build. The box top showed them in a Touring car with the woman in the back seat. I didn't think that they would both fit in the front seat and she wouldn't really slum it in the little seat on the back of the car so I decided to sit her on a bench and have the man in the driving seat. However, the man does not fit in the roadster as he sits about 4 mm higher than the seat - obviously just designed to fit the Tourer. I adapted the woman to sit on a bench but was not willing to hack into the man to get him to fit either the bench or the car so I didn't use him. I built it straight out of the box only adding some Uschi van der Rosten mahogany decals and a couple of scratch-built straps for the roof canopy. Here are the pictures. Thanks for looking Mick
    8 points
  29. What a beautiful kit. No WIP pics as it fell together so fast I didn't have time to take them. Perfect fit, excellent engineering, I loved it. This is a sort of what if scheme as Singapore has only just bought the F-35B. I am assuming that they will get the latest paint spec so the ram tapes are not prominent. Decals were put together from spares.
    8 points
  30. So checked to see if “FIFI” was still there and she was. So this evening I hopped in the car and drove the 1.5 miles over to the airport. Sadly I cant get any closer than the fence line as the security there is good. It turns out the Catalina I spotted a while back might be based here now ? It keeps returning and is never gone for more than a few hours. Too bad its raining and overcast but Here are a few shots. So Im going to tag @Cookenbacher, @72modeler, @Procopius, @John Laidlaw, @Biggles87, and @keefr22 as you have liked the previous posts. Dennis
    8 points
  31. Being as I posted up my Tyrrell P34, figured I better do the Porsche a turn...here goes...I started documenting this build late so unfortunately I have no close up shots of the (now buried) engine......thes pics will have to suffice. *Images of engine/fuel tank and interior are taken during build process...difficult to photo now... Interior details... So thats about it...not a standard build, go check it out here on Britmodeller!! Thanks...Enjoy your modelling
    7 points
  32. Hello mates, now some older stuff (again) Completed in the year 2000, one of 3 models in 2000 ... together with F-5E and AT-3 ... I am a Jaguar Fan you know Cheers, Tom
    7 points
  33. Hi folks, this is yet another night fighter kit I built this year. Basically, the Hasegawa kit OOB with few extras (OWL decals, AML nose, Airone Hobby fabric masks) and couple of scratch built items (opened canopy and front entry hatch). The MM 850 served with 68.squadron, where its 'B' flight was formed of Czechoslovak airmen. On the night 7th October 1943 the crew P/O Šerhant / F/Sgt Nečas shot down a Do 217 off Yarmouth, while the other crew damaged a Ju 88 few months earlier. Cheers Libor
    7 points
  34. And finally my 1/48 scratch built Alcock Scout aka the Sopwith Mouse. What would be know in the motor industry as a parts bin special . Designed by John Alcock a notable pilot of the time. The cowl, foward fuselage and lower wings came from. Sopwith triplane , the upper wing from a Pup, the tail from a Camel. All things considered it made for quite a sleek looking plane by the standards of the day.
    7 points
  35. Well, well, well... it's been a jolly busy week and so I haven't had a vast amount of time to devote to this project. However, I have had the pleasure of receiving copies of the hallowed tail fairing in the post, courtesy of the wonderful @redleader: The obligatory before.... ...and after. Progress was also made on the main rotor: Nothing too painful was encountered on the build of the rotorhead or blades, but a great deal of masking tape was sacrificed in the process of painting it. The yellow blade tips are courtesy of the kit's own decals. Two things of note with the paintwork on the rotor blades: firstly I believe the colour of the blade's leading edge is a bit lighter than it shoulder otherwise be, yet I'm becoming increasingly tempted to stick with it, what do you guys think? And secondly, you might notice the occasional patch of darker grey paint on the main area of the blades... this definitely wasn't the result of using the wrong shade of grey to carry out paint-repairs... but it certainly gives the impression of a well-used (and loved) helicopter. Slower progress was made on the interior... The two rear seats were installed, with a strip of plasticard used to represent the swivel-base, as evidenced in @VooDoo-S8's fine reference photos. The roof is very much still a work-in-progress job, but I would greatly appreciate some thoughts on the fitting of the parts... (Forgive the shoddy paintwork and smears of filler, still a work-in-progress) I have cut the roof part into multiple sections to make fitting them easier, so: The question is.... -The main horizontal roof part, is that to go beneath the rear coaming of the main front windscreen (as shown below): -Or should it instead fit behind the coaming, like so: I am tempted to go for the latter, at the moment. On the decal front, I have received word back from the lovely folks at the Midlands Air Ambulance, who have very kindly said that the font used for the "Midlands Air Ambulance Charity" decals is "DIN Next LT Arabic Bold". Armed with this information, I have had a crack at designing said decals: And on the paint front, as recommended, there's a bottle of Sulfur Yellow on its way right now! So, that's in from me at the moment. As always, thank you for dropping by and thanks for all your help so far. Best wishes, Sam P.S: A certain delta-winged giant arrived last week, as well as some new paint for it, so I'm desperately resisting the urge to start it!
    7 points
  36. Darryl, if that's your real name....I'm glad you only have a mild case of how I suffer from this affliction. If you feel watching this GB has affected you, there is a helpline available to prevent the purchase of any more kits. (It's from SWMBO) Remember you are not on your own, there are others like you.....everywhere. (Those two FW190 boxes also contain a Bf 109G-6 and the Bunny Club boxes are combo kits with two Bf 109G-6 kits) So Darryl (If that's your real name?) Do you think you have a problem yet? I know I have.
    7 points
  37. The model represents a Fieseler Fi 156 C-3/Trop of the Wüstennotstaffel 1 (SAR squadron). The plane is in the basic scheme 70/71/65, with a narrow 'wawe mirror' in sand RLM 79 superimposed on it. The painting, as my habit, was made entirely by brush. This scheme was not applied in Africa, as in the case of many other airplanes, but made directly in the factory, before the transfer for operational use. The codes, printed by me, are, as often happened for this unit, the factory ones (Stammkennzeichen). Some photos illustrating various details Finally an image of the lower surfaces. Note that the lower wingtips are not painted in white. Hope you like it Criticism and suggestions as always welcome Thanks for viewing Giampiero Piva
    6 points
  38. This was a fun mini project. Another 3D print bought from a lovely gentleman called Jeff who seems to enjoy printing AFV as much as I enjoy painting. And I couldn’t resist this guy with a chameleon! My Africa shelf is filling up nicely. Next project as an SDKFZ 251, which is going to be loaded with figures. Thanks for looking and for any comments.
    6 points
  39. G'day Chums,a couple from the Drawer of Doom this time. Many moons ago the Daily Mail did a little tie up with Airfix which I took full advantage of.In the stash I had an old tool offering from the Millenium collection issue complete with the not too spectacular decals.This was before the time when I had access to spectacles and a bench magnifier.I thought I'd build both together and note the differences.They got to the point of final assembly and that's where they stopped for several years.The other day they resurfaced so I decided to fit the undercarriages and exhausts,complete the propellors and generally finish them off.Well here they are,enjoy. Thanks all for looking in.
    6 points
  40. Aaaand done: Actually, “done enough”. It’s a desktop model. Sometime, maybe never, I will: check if the backs of the propeller blades were painted black; paint navigation lights at the wingtips; paint landing lights at the leading edges; add shadow around and underneath the cooling gills; pitot tube under port wing; and give it a coat of varnish. This kit was one of the founding members of my born-again stash. I’m very happy to have had the opportunity to build it in the GB, so thank you for that! Thanks for looking, Adrian
    6 points
  41. Thanks @Grey Beema, that's a great still and a great reference! Just a small update today - got the fuselage seams pretty much under control, and added the canopy. I also put the cowling together, but its seams will require even more work that the fuselage. Oh, and I added a plasticard fairing to make it look more like a -3 cowl.
    6 points
  42. I feel it's only fair to warn other modellers of the dangers of associating with certain members of this GB....No names mentioned so I'll just call him ... Superannuated Robert. Until starting this GB I'd no intention of adding to the loft insulation but the certain aforementioned "Superannuated Robert " appears to make this whole kit acquisition lark far too acceptable.... Let me tell you for your own wellbeing it most certainly is not!! It's a disease, an addiction, that is peddled by ne'er-do-wells trying to justify their own scandalous habit that has got out of hand... This, this is what happens when things get out of hand and the dark side of the hobby rears its ugly and dangerous head... Unfortunately this doesn't even include the brace of P51s and a Spitfire story Mk1 dual boxing... Remember chaps, just say no, for the love of God, just say NO!!! (It's ok @Retired Bob I didn't give you away, think I've protected your animosity!)
    6 points
  43. Not much progress but I've managed to move this on a little. Interior and dashboard are pretty much complete. The body is just resting in place to give an idea of the final look. The decals for the gauges went on really well, I was worried that they might disintegrate given they are pretty old. As standard the gear lever and horn button are chrome plated, these were stripped and re-painted. I really need to sort out the paint on the body.
    6 points
  44. Eduard 1/48 109-e Ernst Arnold, I found this a very enjoyable build and my first using mr color paints which I'm totally converted to. No issues at all with this apart from a little surgery to get the gear away. Build thread Dave
    6 points
  45. So only a couple of hours at the bench today but progress has been made on the engine and I have to say I'm very happy with the results so far. For a 2010 engine I think it looks about right and certainly looking at my reference pic's I'm not to far off the real thing. Here's a few pic's of today's progress The pulleys and belts need to dry properly before I can fix them in place but should look ok once fitted. That's where the build stands atm and it maybe a while before I get back to the bench due to work commitments and my impending trip to Silverstone for the British GP . Thanks for looking back soon
    5 points
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