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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/28/2020 in all areas

  1. This poor model started life in the Operation Overlord GB, way back in July 2019 This is the Eduard (Gavia) 1/48 Lysander. Eduard added resin and PE. The decals are from Blackbird Models' Operation Overlord set. As described in the build thread, some scratch building was needed to build this particular aircraft. Thanks for looking!
    28 points
  2. Hello everybody, Here are a couple of pictures from my two Hasegawa F-15's that I completed earlier this month. Both are largely out of the box, with basically only resin seats added. Paints are Tamiya and Gunze acrylics. Decals for the F-15DJ (a 2001 JASDF aggressor) are a mix of DXM and spare Hasegawa sheets. For the F-15C (57th FIS Black Knights, based at Keflavik, Iceland ca. 1985) I used an Astra Decals sheet for the specific unit markings, combined with spare high viz stencils. Comments or remarks always welcome!! All the best, Patrick
    24 points
  3. Let me start by saying I am fully aware that current scholarship is pretty sure that St.G 2's snake designs were rendered with sand-colored patches, not red. In answer to this, I will cite two facts: first, those were the decals I had...and second...I remember being a wide-eyed thirteen-year-old when the Revell 1/32 Stuka was first released back in 1969, with that eye-popping, 'holy cow' Jack Leynwood painting of the red and white snake marking on the box...so all these years later, my 'little kid' brain is still okay with that! (Besides, I have both 1/48 and 1/32 'proper' decals 'in the bag,' to do historically-acurate versions in larger scales in due time.) Despite being labeled as a 'snap fit' kit, the Zvezda offering is a little gem: petitely-rendered molding, satisfyingly-complete cockpit detail and excellent fit overall. The only semi-shortcoming is the canopy; though thin, beautifully-molded and crystal-clear, it's all a single-piece, except for the separate, circular 'fishbowl' insert at the rear gunner's position; here the fit is a bit dodgy, and because of the small size and architecture of the two parts, it's challenging to get a precise fit. On the plus side, the kit supplies both bombs and optional drop-tanks for the wing pylons, allowing easy modeling of the longer-range Ju87R variant which proved useful in the North African campaign. It didn't supply an option for the deeper 'tropical' air intake on the starboard cowling; I fudged a little 'extender' to approximate that feature. Paints were mixes of Tamiya acrylics for the standard 70/71/65 RLM splinter scheme, and for the early-ish Italian 'Giallo Mimetico' overpainting to adapt it to a more desert-suitable camouflage. Decals were from a company I'd never heard of before -- 'Crazy Modelers' -- which I believe I picked up at the old 'Great Models' going-out-of-business sale, years back. Quality was excellent, with snakes and national insignia laying down without a hitch; the Zvezda sheet supplied a few useful stencils, and some other lettering was sourced from spares. A fun build. I heartily recommend the Zvezda kit to all Luftwaffe and Stuka fans.
    24 points
  4. First off, sorry for being absent for a while...it´s been, you know....life :P Anyways I´ve put togehter a AJS37 Viggen from Tarangus and it´s not for me! No, it´s a comission build! My first but not my last :D To please a paying customer I set out to make a kit fit for a model show :D I added CMK wheels, CMK reverse thrust paddles, Pilot replica ejection seat, Master pitot tubes and Eduard Mavericks on pylons from Maestro and some Moose Republic decals Armed with all this after market I made this, painted with MRP. Thganx for looking :D
    20 points
  5. I'm calling this one done. A relatively short build for me! And mostly OOB. My usual deliberations on which scheme to go for, from the five RAF markings on offer with this kit. I liked them all, so another build may be on the cards. I picked up an old copy of Roald Dahl's Going Solo in a charity shop for 10p, and have only just finished it. Had I picked it up before I started the build I would have chosen the 80(F) Sqn markings shown on the box art, the squadron Dahl joined in Greece after recovering from crashing his Gladiator en-route to joining them when they were stationed in Egypt. In the end I went with my default preferences for prewar RAF, and chose 33 Sqn based out in Palestine in early 1939. There are a lot of things I could do better on this kit, which isn't without it's faults either, but it was still fun to build. And I received some excellent advice and tips on the build thread. This is my first attempt at rigging a biplane. It is a little rough around the edges and a few short cuts were made. Hopefully they aren't as obvious to you as they are to me! 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr 1/48 Roden Gloster Gladiator Mk.I by Mike, on Flickr
    19 points
  6. Latest off the bench is my first WWI fighter, the Roden 1/72 Sopwith F.1 Camel. This aircraft is my first biplane, as well as my first attempt at full rigging. I used 0.047 mm rubber thread for the rigging. The rigging is clearer in the photos than on the actual model - I think maybe next time I would try ~0.06 or 0.07 mm rigging for better visibility. I originally drilled small holes to sit the glue/thread, but these just became drops of CA glue on the surface after repeated attempts, particularly for the rigging between wings. The rigging took me two long (4+ hr) sessions, and was a definite exercise in patience. The kit also had a small windshield on plastic sheet to cut out and add, but I only remembered once the top wing was fitted and half the rigging was done - I'm too scared to try and add it now! Building a biplane was definitely a whole different experience, particularly one on such a small scale. Fitting the top wing without a jig was a battle, and the aircraft has a bit of a lean, but I will definitely be adding a few more WWI biplanes to the stash. I've already started on a 1/72 Lancaster just to give my eyes a bit of a rest. Thanks for looking. CC welcome. Edit: Better photos
    18 points
  7. F-117A NIGHTHAWK Trumpeter 1:32 There are quite a lot of F-117 models on the forum. However, in my opinion, there are few models that do not show a black plane. I tried to make the model so that it wouldn't be another model of the black F-117
    17 points
  8. Hi everyone, This is my latest model: Academy’s new 1/72 F-14A depicting “Wichita 103” in 1985 using DXM decals. This is an excellent kit and my favorite that I have built. The engineering is very good and the exterior shape perfect to my eyes. The DXM decals were also quite good, but missed a few things: the gear door placards used by VF-1 were missed and the anti-skid walkways looked a tad off in shape. I used the Furball-Aero VF-111 and their VF-41/VF-32 set for these details. The kit went together very quickly and was built in 2.5 months with most of that time spent post-construction on painting, weathering, and dilly-dallying . Aftermarket details include Quickboost intakes and ventral fins (to spare ejector mark filling), Master pitot, DXM VF-1 decals, and seats/throttle, control stick, and canopy details from an Aires cockpit set. The cockpit is very nice, especially with a few small editions. I wouldn’t bother adding the whole Aires set, definitely not worth the effort given what can be accomplished with the base cockpit. I also detailed the nosegear wheel well with lead wire and a few parts from the Hasegawa kit. The kit was painted with Mission Models acrylics with MRP for the metallics. MRP’s new acrylic metallic for brush painting are really nice, by far the nicest that I’ve tried. Weathered with oil paints. I highly recommend this kit to anyone with an interest in Tomcats or USN aircraft. It is a joy to build, takes to detailing well, and looks great once finished. The cockpit was hard to see in the winter light today, so I included a construction shot and another photo taken with a flash. Detail is very nice for an injection kit if you add aftermarket seats and a few details like a better stick and throttle. All comments and feedback welcome. Best, Nick
    15 points
  9. 14 points
  10. Hello from locked down Greece!😷 This is my last model that I managed to complete last month. It's a T-6G Texan in the colours of the Hellenic Air Force in the last days of it's service. This model means a lot to me as it is built for my father that flew the type back in summer of 1968 as a 1st year cadet in Air Force Academy and got his wings in it. His class was the last to fly with Texans. The kit is the Italeri in 1/48 but actually is the OCIDENTAL with a few extra parts. The Eduard photo etched parts set was also used. It was painted with Humbrol enamels and specifically 128 and 116 for the upper surfaces and 127 for the lower surfaces. The two middle canopies were replaced with scratch built pieces from heated and formed transparent packaging plastic (the kit's were very thick). The camouflage is supposed to be the green/grey NATO scheme which was really popular in HAF during late 60's - early 70's and almost every plane was painted in that camo. The pattern in T-6s was rather random and the paints used were not necessarily aircraft paints (especially during the last years). As a result there was a lot of chipping in the aircrafts paintwork. I tried to capture the aircraft at a specific time of it's service! I don't know if I made it but I hope you like it! Take care everyone!
    14 points
  11. Afternoon all, Hot off the bench, No.23 for the year and a return to the Fleet Air Arm with my second Corsair of the year, this time finished as a Mk II with the help once again of an Xtradecal sheet. I threw in some Eduard seat belts but otherwise it is built from the box. Finished as ever using Hataka Orange Line, with Tamiya and Alclad providing a base for the chipping. Still working on mastering that technique, which is made all the more difficult using Lacquer paints... Tamiya 1/72 Vought Corsair II by Shaun Schofield, on Flickr Tamiya 1/72 Vought Corsair II by Shaun Schofield, on Flickr Tamiya 1/72 Vought Corsair II by Shaun Schofield, on Flickr Tamiya 1/72 Vought Corsair II by Shaun Schofield, on Flickr Tamiya 1/72 Vought Corsair II by Shaun Schofield, on Flickr Thanks for looking, comments welcomed, Shaun
    13 points
  12. Hi all here is my latest built Tigermoth No.2 from Airfix. Enjoyable modeling. Rigging was done with PRYM elastics. Cables for rudder and so on is the elastics from Uschi van der Rosten. Enough waffeling, please enjoy the pic’s. best regards Andy B
    13 points
  13. Hello everyone This is 1/32 Hasegawa P-40(M) Kittyhawk Mk.III with the markings of GA M FR864 from RAF 112 Sqn North Africa 1943. Cockpit enhanced by Eduard PE set. I have used Eduard’s Exhaust and Wheel sets. Paints are Gunze and Tamiya acrylics. Sharkmouth painted by using DN models customized masks. Happy modelling
    12 points
  14. As promised in the build thread HERE A few more pictures of the complete model are provided: And, a comparison with it's rader-dome-nosed brethren: Except for the gnarly landing gear, this was a fun a fairly easy to build kit. I recommend Planet Models kits wholeheartedly, but some, like this one, have a few challenges. Thanks for looking, Ed
    11 points
  15. Hi guys, Here's my take on Sturmgeschutz Ausf D, one of three Stugs of Sonderverband 288 special purpose unit. Unit arrived in North Africa between November 1941 and May 1942. Three Stugs were part of No. 5 Company, that most likely arrived to North Africa in May 1942 on Thessalia. The unit participated in Gazala battle, where one Stug was lost (captured after doing some scouting). Second Stug was lost during retreat after second battle of El Alamein after it ran out of fuel and third one was captured at Cape Bon in Tunis after being hit and abandoned. Two of these vehicles (I think one captured after retreat from El Alamain and one captured at Cape Bon) were taken to UK for examination, where one was scrapped and the other used for target practice. The one used for target practice was recently restored to running condition. All three vehicles are very similar, so one I built could be any of them. Bronco kit No. CB35117 is quite nice and there are just a few accuracy and construction issues worth mentioning: There are 4 single link track holders on the right fender and 2 on the left fender that do not exist in the kit. I scrap build them, although I built only right fender ones (I found the photo of the left fender too late). The pipes taking air from tropical air filters to engine deck are missing, scrap built as well. Lights protection on the left fender is incorrect, so I had to modify it. Return rollers are to tight and track horns do not fit. I added 0.5mm styrene sheet between two parts to make them a bit wider. Tracks are very well molded but there are fit issues with drive sprocket. It simple does not fit well. I am not sure is it a problem with drive sprocket or tracks though. There's also a question about tropical air filters and were they mounted to these Stugs at all. While these filters were cylindrical, some images show boxes where these filters should be mounted. However, some images clearly show the cylindrical filter support with straps used to attach them. The most probable explanation is that at some point filters were replaced by additional stowage boxes. However, were they replaced on all vehicles, before sending to NA or after, it remains unknown. The build you can see here is my guess on how they looked like. Vehicle is painted RAL 8000 (Gunze H402) over RAL 7021 (MRP) and weathered with AK and MIG pigments and nature effects. I added few Value Gear stowage bits. Thanks for looking and thanks for any feedback! And few shots on black background: Cheers, Nenad
    10 points
  16. This is Eduard sublime 48th scale Ltd Ed kit, enhanced with a resin gun bay and PE landing flaps. The figure is by Barracuda. Paints are MR.
    10 points
  17. Tim's Academy 1/72 McDonnell Douglas F-15C Eagle
    10 points
  18. Hello all Here's my attempt at Revell's 1/48 Me410, an OOB build using the kit decals, for a B-2/R-4 of ZG26 in April 1944. Overall, a hugely enjoyable build, with the only slight let down being the canopy parts - which are not a particularly good fit, but didn't detract too much from the overall experience. The fit of the rest of the kit, I thought, was quite impressive. This is a fair bit bigger than the single-engine jobbies I've been building to date, so maybe it's a size thing.. Painted with a combination of Vallejo and Mig. Vallejo RLM 76, Mig RLM 74 (more grau, less grun) and Vallejo 'dark gull grey' in place of their RLM 75 - tried it as an experiment with the Mig 74 and I think it looks like a decent match. I'd be interested to hear what others think. Anyway, here we go..
    9 points
  19. Here are a pair of desert scheme Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17PF "Fresco Ds" I built back in 2014. Both are from the Attack 1:144 kit moulds, the Syrian one from the original boxing whereas the Egyptian one was from the Mark I re-boxing. The Mark I kit came with a resin cockpit so I used it as a guide to scratchbuild one for the Attack kit using a Matador Models white metal MiG-21PF seat. Both kits had the radio mast and wing probes added from stretched sprue. The missing sway braces for the drop tanks were also added from thin plastic sheet. They were fully painted and varnished by brush. Firstly, ‘452’ of the Syrian Air Force, Syria, early 1970s. Secondly, a MiG-17PF of the Air Defence Air Regiment, United Arab Republic (Egypt) Air Force, Egypt, June 1967, during the Six Day War. Thanks for looking Miguel
    9 points
  20. Supposed to be a mojo booster, or at least something I wouldn't completely mess up, these new tool Airfix kits looked to be a good candidate. Although I wasn't disappointed they still took far longer than my usual build speed, but they're finished now and presented for your kind inspection. Just don't look too closely. I was challenged to use the starter set paints and did so on the Scooter, although not on the SHar. WiP thread here: First the Skyhawk, or 'Scooter'. And the SHar:
    9 points
  21. Hi all, back again for another brief update, but first, thanks to all for the feedback - it's most definitely appreciated! I did have a little OH **** moment earlier in the week when I tipped the turntable onto which I had taped the model, only to remember as it slid off onto the bench that I had removed the tape holding it in place! A quick check revealed that the left upper boom had popped loose at the tail end. Fortunately it was quickly and easily CAd back into place and all the rigging remains taut. Phew! An unexpected day off due to a schedule change has left me a little extra time to spend on this, although I'm still waiting for my new markers for the rigging. Having said that, at least I can get everything ready so when they arrive I can get straight on it. Today's jobs then: 1) Finish the rigging on the underside - namely the elevator control horns and undercarriage. Done! 2) Finish painting the cockpit edge (there was a metal bead around it, presumably to remove what could otherwise be a rather sharp razor like edge to the nacelle!) and add the pilot's head rest. Done! 3) Add the pulleys and control horns on the upper wing for the aileron rigging. Done! These pulleys are flush on the surface and not proud like those on the underside, which made them far easier to fit. Jobs remaining now: Aileron rigging on the upper wing Repair a tail rigging line which I accidently cut when fitting the elevator lines. Paint touch up on the control horns and one or two other areas Fit the wheels Fit the engine Fit the Lewis gun - I also need to make a spent cartridge bag and do some work on the mounting. Definitely on the home straight now! Thanks for looking in, stay safe! Ian
    9 points
  22. Very kind of you Sir, thanks Thanks Giorgio - maybe next time! It does Adrian, thanks for the tip Great story, thanks Dave Thanks John I wonder if the intake is still there? Quick Google maps… Looks like the pub is a Dentist now (boo!) but wait, what's that round thing in the garden? Could it be? Thanks Steve I hope you find the later mould. This one is too shiny! Thanks Dave That's a great desk ornament… making me wonder if the ceiling is the best place after all this work. Thanks Johnny - mojo has improved, thank goodness Thanks Bill Are you WiPing the bus? Can't see one yet. Um, it's a problem of scale: That's my 'little' finger. I did smooth as much as I could with the sculpting tools and I'll use your 'PPP wet on a cotton bud' tip later. I clamped and glued the inner intake on one side: …which produced the desired result: Things are getting messy now: I realised I would have trouble getting the other inner intake fitted and that I'd have to join up and try to pull it out (cheeky!) That left a gap (rat) so it's had some sprue gloop applied: We'll see how that turns out. One thing I've realised over the years watching great modellers on here is that, if you want a model that looks realistic, you need to 'zoom in' your eyes and correct all the imperfections. Pass three on the flaps: Getting there.
    9 points
  23. Finish no11 for 2020 is the second from the Eduard Grunherz boxing of the Fw190A5/8 this time as kit option A flown by Lt E Lang of 5./JG54 during the summer of 1943 in the Soviet Union. Lt Lang, a recipient of the Knight's Cross, who managed to shoot down 173 aircraft during 400 combat sorties until he was shot down by F/Lt Terry Spencer flying a Spitfire mkXII September 1944 over Belgium. Built OOB using the kit photo etch, painted with Mr Colour and Tamiya acylics with some MIG powders for exhaust staining. Not as happy with this one as the A8 finished earlier but its still come out OK. As usual all comment welcome, and WIP is below
    8 points
  24. Good morning everyone... Id like to present my Matchbox 1/72 Vickers Wellesley. It represents an aircraft from 14 Squadron Port Sudan in Summer 1940. The only modification done to the kit is to pose the side windows open and mount a gun in the starboard position as similar to this photo. I understand there is some debate to the colors of these Wellesley’s but I think the contrast lends itself to being Dark earth/Light Stone or Sand. So in the end I opted to go with those colors. To give you a visual comparison of the size here it is to a contemporary aircraft, the Heinkel He.112B a Heller 1/72 kit. I say contemporary as they both first flew in 1935. Please feel free to ask questions, post comments, or add thoughts. Dennis
    8 points
  25. Believe it or not, the Great Scuttle-a-Thon of 2020 is entering the final straight. There are two sizes involved, & I am within 3 of finishing the larger size - would have done it today listening to the rugby, but I found a bit of a gouge where I’d removed a Merit ledge so awaiting putty drying (see the white mark). Apart from the 3 on the putty, there are 19 of a smaller size to fit, & then we’re done. There will still be detail to add (ladder rungs etc) to the hull side, but it will still be a significant milestone... possibly even tomorrow They’re not that easy to see in these photos - the white putty (filling Merit’s holes) and/or pencil marks (showing where they should be in places where Merit don’t agree with my refs for 1941) show up more clearly than the brass; trust me, they’re there - all 250-odd of them on this side alone! More soon Crisp Edit: you can see more of them from this angle!
    8 points
  26. Now with some silbergrau underneath and some orange bits:
    8 points
  27. Hi, everybody! This is my next model from the remaining 1/72 stock.
    7 points
  28. Nope! Even a new tank on the battlefield will be months old and undergone a sea crossing, resulting in salt and UV degradation to paint. German ones tend to used longer than allied ones unless they're destroyed early on as the Germans needed to keep equipment going wherever possible. The nature of the machine means it operates in a environment a little harsher than that of the Aldi car park, men and equipment are moved across it and get tied to it. The drivers view out is limited which could result in the odd blemish or scuff to the paintwork, not to mention the enemy gets a vote in what happens to it. So if you're manoeuvring out of the way of a potentially angry 88mm AP round you might not worry to much about glancing off buildings or a bit of shrubbery and the least of your concerns will be, I'll have to take a little T-cut to that nasty scratch I might have just done. This is the Ardennes 44, bit muddy, even if the Sherman is remarkable straight. Saying all that, I don't like lots of mud, unless particularly well done which is really hard to get realistic. And some afv models are over weathered, as the old saying goes, less is usually more. Best bet look at lots of period pics and really well done models until you get a feel for it yourself.
    7 points
  29. I've sprayed the Grigio Azzurro on the underside, and unmasked the white band on the fuselage. This then got a rough respray with the VOS as on the real thing. I also resprayed the nose with a dark metallic, and removed the cowlings again and masked them off for the metallic exhaust collector rings. Quite pleased with everything so far.
    7 points
  30. By my standards a quick build of the "new" Airfix 1/72 Buccaneer. Didn't do much other than build it out the box (apart from stealing the bombs from the phantom kit waiting to be built to put in the bomb bay). Kit decals and Humbrol paint (123 as far as I remember). The kit went together with no real problems. A bit of care needed where the two rear sections of the fuselage go together, or it could have been me not paying enough attention to the build sequence. I plan to build a couple more, and may be I'll add a bit more detail next time. Tim
    7 points
  31. And here it is with all the major resin added... Happy with that. Iain
    7 points
  32. This is the Heller 1/72 Messerschmitt Bf-109E (catalogue number 089) dating from 1975 finished in the markings of Uffz Leo Zaunbrecher's Red 14 of 2/JG 52. Zaunbrecher was shot down and captured on the 12th August 1940 after successfully crash landing at Mays Farm, Selmeston in Sussex. This is another really nice little kit from Heller. Matched the plans well, the fit is great and I would certainly build a few more. Last time I built this kit was in 1984. I'm not sure why I left it so long to build another. One major boob with my finished build, I had these decals for Zaunbrecher's 109 for some time, and thought this would be the perfect excuse to finally use them. So off I storm like the proverbial bull in a china shop only to discover that his Emil was in fact an E-1, and what I've done is effectively an E-3. Ho hum! Although I'm calling this done, I have noticed that a bit of tidying up needs done and there's still a bit of the aerial to add, but it will do me. Fairly happy with the hairy stick paint finish just as long as I view it from six feet away whilst wearing beer goggles. WIP here... Steve
    7 points
  33. I'd like to offer my latest completed kit for inspection: the Hawker Hurricane Mk1 flown by P/O Paul Ritchie, No 1 Squadron. First, the man and his aircraft: It was reading his book "Fighter Pilot" that inspired this build.... in 1969.....!! His aircraft, Hurricane L1697 was one of the first production batch, built by Hawkers at either Kingston upon Thames or at Brooklands in 1939 and was the 150th Hurricane built. As with all the first order, she was built with a 2 blade Watts propeller and fabric wings: the first 430 Hurricanes were so assembled. She, along with many other fabric winged aircraft were later fitted with metal wings at RAF MUs, before being assigned to a squadron: photographic evidence is equivocal, at least one photo shows gun rearming panels that look like those on a metal wing. She was allocated to No 1 Squadron at Tangmere Airfield and was marked with Squadron Codes JX and the individual letter G. Pilot Officer Richey was posted, in March 1939, to No.1 Squadron based at Tangmere, flying Hawker Hurricanes and G was assigned to him. Richey’s wonderfully written book, Fighter Pilot was written during the war, I am lucky enough to have an original “Censored” edition, where all the pilots names are replaced by either nicknames or Christian names. Compared with the last edition, published just after his death in 1989, there is also a lot of detail that has been censored. When the Revell kit appeared in 1969 I decided to build a model of Richey’s aircraft! On Friday 8th September, 5 days after the declaration of war, No1 were ordered to France as part of the air component of the BEF, where they flew patrols from their base at Vassincourt for the duration of what became known as the Phoney War. The squadron codes were over painted, leaving only the aircraft letter and “French” style rudder markings applied. It is unclear if the serial number was over painted, on some photographs of No 1 Squadron Aircraft there is no sign of the serial number but painted in black on dark green fabric it would not have stood out anyway. The A/C is believed to have had black/white/Aluminium under surfaces, but again the evidence is not firm. During this period, Richey experienced combat for the first time, and scored his first victory, downing an Me109 on the 29th March 1940. In early April 1940 the 2-blade propeller disintegrated at 25,000, Richey made an uneventful landing back at base. Later in the month Richey landed at the French Air Force base at Charleville-Mézières to refuel after combat. Avoiding bomb craters, he damaged a wing tip and had to leave his faithful G with its Red Spinner to be repaired. Three days later whilst the RAF repair team were at the airfield an attack by the Luftwaffe destroyed all the aircraft on the field, including “G” That was the end of L1697. I started building this model in 1969, just after it was released… the roundels are hand painted, only the A/C letter, serials and stencil markings are modern transfers. I have applied some weathering as during 1939/40 the airfields in France were rough, grass strips and both mud and then dust were problems. The photograph above of Paul suggests I may have not applied enough mud.... Early Merlin engines were not that oil tight, so some oil marks and of course some exhaust staining. The Revell kit has/had some issues, most noticeably around the cockpit glazing, which works out at about 6” thick, the propeller spinner, which is way overscale and the lower nose, which lacks that gentle curve-and-dip look to the underside of the nose. Because I didn’t know what I know now I fitted the 2 bladed Watts propeller which solved the spinner issue, and white metal U/C legs as the originals were very brittle. I couldn't come up with anything straightforward to deal with the nose so otherwise the kit is as it was, back 45 years or so ago. I recently replaced the canopy; like the original was, it is thin and flexible! So, we have a model of an aeroplane that most probably should have fabric wings, which is a bit unfortunate. Why did the build take so long? I was still at school when the kit was released but had already begun to be distracted by girls. University followed in 1970, with more girls, then cars followed by work, family and life in general pushed modelling into a corner. I made a few kits and added to the stash, but a number were started nut not finished. Now retired I’m a “Seenager”, able to do what I want, when I want. So, it is back to working at my model bench listening to music. I’m pleased with the model, yes it could be better but I think it captures the look of the time. This is the link to the Work in Progress Thread... And these are the photos of the result.. let me know what you think! So there we are, started in 1969, finished in 2020... is this a record?
    6 points
  34. Hi everyone I've still to finish my other Revell/Hasagawa Phantom FGR.2 build but I received my other kit in the post and at the same time I also received the Aires resin cockpit. I've read and heard that the fit of the Aires cockpit isn't the best and you essentially have to preform major surgery to get it to fit, well, well I couldn't resist having a look at it and I kinda got carried away this morning and I've managed (without too much real effort) to get it to fit very, very well, yes I had to remove a heck of a lot of resin and plastic but it was more time consuming rather than anything else. Here it is (its only dry fitted for now).. From the photo's you can see that the cockpit tub it actually a little loose! Cheers Iain
    6 points
  35. The Short SB5 was built to test the wing shape design for the EE Lightning and could be configured for three different angles of sweep, it could also be fitted with a T-tailed rear fuselage. The real aircraft is now preserved at the RAF Museum Cosford. This is the Maintrack vacform with home made decals for it's later life as Tester 28 from the Empire Test Pilots School. Steve
    6 points
  36. Hi There, I bought this at Scale Scotland Murrayfield last year and have been scared stiff to cut the wings ever since. I finally stuck my courage to the sticking place and got on with it. This one is a little personal as the home base for 809 NAS was HMS Fulmar and as it's close to Dingwall this makes her one of mine. Primed with UMP Grey Painted with Colourcoats Extra Dark Sea Grey, Light Aircraft Grey and Light Admiralty Grey, AK Xtreme Metals Aluminium, Lifecolor Dark Admiralty Grey, Tamiya Rubber Black and Desert Yellow. Washed with Citadel Nuln Oil and Flory Dark Dirt. Finished with Windsor & Newton Satin Varnish. I really enjoyed this one but didn't plan it very well, when I build the next one it will be better. As always, Thanks for looking and all comments and criticism are welcome. Cheers, Alistair
    6 points
  37. It's about time I got back into this one, nearly two months since first posting the thread. Working on the principal that time spent on reconnaissance is seldom wasted, I've been taking a closer look at the project. Possible paints have been dug out. S 'n J bronze undercoat and Tamiya clear red in this case. I'll be trying one over the other on a spare car body to see how they behave. The Revell/Heller tires are not that good. Badly moulded and getting a bit sticky, I'll be using home moulded wheels and tires taken from a Revell early Oldsmobile as they look a whole lot better than the originals. The Heller wheels will get cast with the tires as I want a tight fit. The Heller glass bits fit very well indeed. Snap fit and pretty much flush fitting. Lovely stuff. The interior tub will need a bit of fettling to get it fitting better. The door openings are spot on but the well behind the seats needs work where it touches the body. There's a full belly pan on the car, which goes some way to explaining the cars high top speed. Very advanced stuff! It will need modification though. I'll be building this one curbside as I want the paintjob to dominate, not the mechanical bits. Hood and doors will be closed up to get really tight shut lines. This leads to problems with assembly. The belly pan, body, doors and hood need to be as one to get the paintwork done. I want to fit the interior tub after painting the car and that won't be possible once the body is all together. I could fit it and mask the glass areas but I want to fit the glass after paint as well. Less chance that way of pinging any paint off and it keeps the rubber seals moulded on the glass parts nice and sharp. The paint is going to be multi layered and I want to give myself the best chance of success with it. That means cutting away enough of the bellypan to allow me to fit everything in the order I want. The pan can be refitted afterwards and as it's out of sight underneath, the seams or edges shouldn't show. The car has four separate wheel wells to fit. I'll probably drill them for a solid bar axle at each end rather than use the kit suspension. None of that would be seen once built, so why bother complicating things? The paintjob is going to be hard enough on its own! More as it happens. Tony.
    6 points
  38. Walked into the workshop this morning to start polishing the bodyshell, just to realize it looked like a battlefield, again. No space to work on. 200 photos into the build a cleaning up was needed. After spending a while on that I had regained some work space. Not that it got much better or even made much difference overall... For the polishing I again use stuff from my 1/1 scale workshop. Meguiar's have served me quite well since late 80's. In this case after fine sanding I will work thoroughly with 105 and follow up with 205. First careful wet sanding of the spot, or in case needed the whole surface, with Meguiar's 2000 paper. Then follows a good work over with a wet 4000 pad, cut from a used machine pad. After working through the 105 and 205 we're done. Just the rest of the body remaining... With the whole body worked over I washed it well in warm water to get all residues off and blew it dry. It will now rest for a couple hours before masking to continue spraying some inside and underside surfaces. Some Alclad has also been sprayed. The sill strips for the door openings are actually a quite dull aluminium finish on the real cars I have seen, so I used ordinary Alclad aluminium for those. The rear wing stone guards got a coat of Highly polished aluminium.
    6 points
  39. Good question? It depends of how accurate you want it to look, but other than the previously mentioned Aeroclub fuselage there is no 'easy/cheep' way. The way I do it is get hold of a Airfix B.57, for some reason they made the fuselage longer than the standard Canberra, chop the nose off and replace it with what ever B.2 type nose you can get your hands on, you can use the kit wings modified to suite the mark you are building, or add a set of FROG wings and your good to go! The following photos are all built this way; or start with an Airfix PR.9 again chop the nose off add what ever B.2 nose you can find and again use the FROG wings. I've started a build of a PR.3 this way but it's not progressed very far. John
    6 points
  40. ok folks, I wouldn't normally do a midday update...but there's more carnage in the poll the a series of Game of Thrones!!! Though we won't go into the incestuous bits....... We only had 1 new member vote, but the rest!!!!! This is actually the 27th Pt.2 chart....when I get up it'll be updated again. But we can tell it's the weekend, we're bored, can't go to the pub's cause of lock-down.....stuck at home with the Misses and kids....no free modelling time....... it's 40c outside (well it was here...and tomorrow)...so what better to do them ahead some blood in the polls......and boy did you! See now me on the other hand.....went to my local club meet....drank beer......bought way too many models and stuff....... drank beer...... came home .......had a beer or 3 more ........and sorted out my builds for next year (STGB's and the one special GB).......drank beer .............then came and sorted all this out.......no beer but bed time! Hey it's 40c water won't help!
    6 points
  41. Sam died. His will provided $50,000 for an elaborate funeral. As the last attenders left, Sam's wife Rose turned to her oldest friend Sadie and said, "Well, I'm sure Sam would be pleased." "I'm sure you're right," replied Sadie, who leaned in close and lowered her voice to a whisper. "Tell me, how much did it really cost?" "All of it," said Rose. "Fifty thousand." "No!" Sadie exclaimed. "I mean, it was very nice, but really... $50,000?" Rose nodded. "The funeral was $6,500. I donated $500 to the Shul for the Rabbi's services. The shiva food and drinks were another $500. The rest went for the memorial stone." Sadie computed quickly. "$42,500 for a memorial stone? Oy vey, how big is it?" "Seven and a half carats." Simon.
    6 points
  42. May I present to you my latest build, the Valom Handley Page Harrow, which has just featured as a Work In Progress topic. The kit is beautifully moulded with a lovely rendition of the fabric covering of the real aircraft. The injection transparencies are beautifully clear. The kit also has resin engines and seats, a small sheet of etched brass parts of which most seem impossibly small to use such as the throttle levers, but which contains a very nice instrument panel, a clear sheet with dials to go behind the instrument panel and a superb decal sheet. We also have a well drawn, easy to understand instruction sheet and a painting guide for the two aircraft options printed in colour. Here we have some of the kit's contents. I added some scratchbuilt interior to the cockpit cabin and around the upper turret area. Mostly I had no issues with the construction. The only parts that needed attention were the vertical stabilisers where they meet the tailplanes. The nose and tail turrets are very fiddly to construct, I added gun breaches to the rear turret as only the gun barrels are included, rather like a pair of broom handles sticking out of a dummy turret like on the transport version of the Wellington. Unfortunately, Valom's interpretation of the Armstrong Whitworth upper turret is horrible, it is too big, a strange shape and the gun slot is not straight. I actually used the turret from an Airfix Anson which I found in my spares. I also replaced the kit's weak and thin looking undercarriage struts with stronger thicker struts from my spares. Oh yes, I widened the tailwheel fairing too. My scratchbuilt cockpit module showing the wireless operator and navigator's positions. The interior just before closing up the fuselage. I brush painted the model with Humbrol enamels. I used Matt 119 Light Earth with Matt 30 Dark Green camouflage painted over. Matt 33 Black undersurfaces. Then a coat of Klear floor polish was brushed over the whole model. Beautiful though the kit's decals are, I really like the low viz Munich Crisis scheme of 1938 so that is what I have tried to represent on mine. A few shots of it parked out in the ' snow ' in some natural light. That has been my Valom Handley Page Harrow. Thank you for looking. Now I need to think about what to build next ................. the stash is calling regards, adey
    6 points
  43. I am enjoying your build, Ced, and seeing how one of these should be made. When I made one of these a few years ago I wanted it to look like a desk ornament. I sanded off all rivets and painted it chrome: Dave
    6 points
  44. Sorry to disappoint Charlie aka @Johnson but not Orange but RLM82 over RLM02 with squiggles I thought it was looking a bit drab so as I've looking at other painting guides for these decided to adopt an idea I had seen elsewhere and paint recoverable launch rockets red. Clear parts for both kits have been given the Klear treatment. Canopy fit is a shocker, so I'm toying with the idea of leaving it open. Cheers Pat
    6 points
  45. And after the two layers of white, a third with the race number. Adjacent to the technical pencil you can see part of the tail group, which has received two of its three "tricolore" bands: Not too far now: Yeap, that was a "Phew!" one. Cheers Adrian.
    6 points
  46. Late last night I dug out the Amodel kit and compared seats. There's a size difference alright! So ordered a set of the NeOmega seats in the hope they fill the Trumpeter cockpit better if too big for the Amodel one. If they don't fit I'll have to buy the Tu-22M kit so they don't go to waste Thankfully their MiG-23UB conversion was out of stock otherwise it could have become a much more expensive order In the meantime the wings were fitted
    5 points
  47. Finally finished! This is how she started anew. As you can see, the wing mount suffered a catastrophic structural failure. The wing mount was reconstructed from Evergreen tubing. Round needle files enabled the diagonal member to fit. I also went back to the kit's glazings, except for the rear canopy. And here she is, finished.
    5 points
  48. Not forgetting the landing light that is located under the port wing. This is only present on RAF versions as the Sea Hornet wing fold break went through here. The kit doesn't come with a lens so I've just drawn a circle in pencil and infilled it with silver paint. If you have a lens available in the spares box, drilling a hole to accept it would be another solution. In addition to this, for the 'completest' you could add: the belly door; underwing vents; and cannon shell ejector slots as scribed surface lines.
    5 points
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