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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/02/2020 in all areas

  1. Really enjoyed making this Airfix Spitfire Mk1a - my first model after a 40+ year gap! For this first one I haven't done any weathering or any priming. The decals are a bit shiny having not varnished before applying. But this matters little - it was important to get back into making, get one in the bag and importantly have fun 😀 (have since embraced the Group Builds with a Stuka in progress, and planning a Zero for In The Navy and then a mighty Lancaster) Many thanks Tom
    26 points
  2. Built in the nordic gb thats still ongoing, sbs resin mercury engine , eduard cockpit pe set,and resin doors, rigged using ez line, Cheers Glynn
    26 points
  3. Well....as no doubt many of you fine fine people have been following my build thread of Revell's Sopwith Camel, with a feint stench of Blackadder Goes Forth running all the way through it.... For anyone who may have missed it....you can catch up here So on with the pics! Hope you enjoyed this build, I know I did with all of the Blackadder pics and memes..... And with this in mind...I shall leave you with this......quite possibly one of the best and most tragic scenes of British television......one that absolutely gets me every, single, time..... For all those brave men and women that fought through The Great War......They will be remembered
    22 points
  4. Hello all, My last RFI was a success, so I’d like to submit for your approval another recently finished build. This was a kit I “finished” back in May-April of 2019, with only a couple tiny detail left to do such as add the antenna and the aftermarket resin position lights. I finally took care of those items when I finished my Mustang. The kit is Tamiya’s 2008 offering of the A6M5/5a Zero. This is probably the best kit I’ve ever had the pleasure of putting together, the cockpit specifically is absolutely amazing. I built this once in college as a commission piece... it was very hard to let it go, but the money was nice! After doing some reading about the pilot I wanted to build it again. Sadaaki Akamatsu was the pilot of this plane. If you know the story of Pappy Boyington, Akamatsu was Japan’s answer. He was a wily older pilot who had good skills and a penchant for some rowdy times. If you do any reading on him, make sure your source is reliable... as always, the legend can be quite intoxicating! Here’s a photo of Akamatsu: Now, here’s the finished build. This was my last attempt at black-basing, and it made me realize that the bottom comes out great because it’s light colored. Topside not so much, it’s way too dark to show modulation. I did add some resin goodies to this one, namely a seat from Ultracast, and exhaust & gun barrels from Quickboost. I also used CMK resin nav lights (the blue lights on top of the wing) and Infini Aero Rigging, which I absolutely love. Anyway, here’s why you’re here: This is what the cockpit looked like before joining the fuselage halves. Excellent details. The engine, which I added some ignition wiring to, turned out nice. Much of it is blocked by the tight cowl and large spinner, but hey I’ve got a photo! Thanks for looking, and please feel free to leave questions, comments, and constructive criticism here!
    18 points
  5. Thanks for checking my RFI out. Cheers JJ
    17 points
  6. 1/72 gloster gladiator ,built using the smashing little airfix kit,
    16 points
  7. A captured red army nkl-26 aerosan in finnish markings,made from the trumpeter 1/35 kit
    15 points
  8. Hi! This is Eduard 1/48 P-51D Mustang. It was flown by Irving Snedeker, who belonged to 364th FS, 357 FG, based in the UK, April 1945. The model was painted using Gunze colors. Best regards Rune Haugen Norway
    14 points
  9. Here's my 1/48 Airfix Spitfire PR.XIX (S.31) in Swedish markings, using Moose Republic decals. Painted with MRP. Thanks for looking. I hope you like it. Pete
    14 points
  10. Hi All, Just completed this Street Fighter. Thanks for viewing, for more photos of this tank click on the link : http://ptearsenal.blogspot.com/2020/03/challenger-ii-street-fighter.html
    13 points
  11. Old, early 2000's Aeropoxy resin kit, discontinued for few years. And in company with Rogožarski IK-3. Thanx for looking , WIP-HERE:
    13 points
  12. Thanks Giorgio Yep, brush painting. Masking would be too hard for me. Speaking of which, I was going to use Filmoplast tape to make the framing but then I looked at this: … which I have to model on this: Well, actually on the canopy which has now been stuck on with Formula 560. I think the best way might be to cut some Aluminium Repair Tape (ART) as it'll be easier to design and adjust the shape in software rather than trying to mask it or paint it. I've taken some photos for the design, like this: Later.
    13 points
  13. A short run kit of a beautifully weird aircraft from Mikro Mir. Build thread is here: And here's the result: If you like that, also check out @Andrew.S 's build of the same kit here: (because it's better than mine) Thanks!
    13 points
  14. I think it's time I dipped my toes into this STGB, stop procrastinating like an old mother hen and build one of my three stashed 1/72 Lancaster kits. All this good Lanc GB chatter has whetted my appetite to build one, and it's an opportunity to tick off another one of those modelling 'Bucket List' items that's been inside my head for ages. Now I cannot recall how old I was when I first read about Bomber Commands plans to send a force of Lancasters (Lincolns) across the Pacific to continue the war against Japan. I also recall feeling slightly disappointed when I continued reading and found out that this was all cancelled when the US shortened the war with their two Atomic raids against Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Since then (must have been 13 or 14), I've always wanted to build a proper 'Tiger Force' Lancaster and over the years have been collecting small pieces of historical notes to help me formulate what a typical TF Lanc would have looked like? Thanks to the internet and a wealth of excellent worldwide researchers, the fuzziness of a typical Tiger Force scheme has become quite a bit clearer and is certainly way ahead of any research that I could have come up with. Therefore, I'm quite happy to take Paul Lucas' latest opinions as published in a fairly recent edition of Scale Aircraft Modelling and kindly supplied to me by one of our great BM contributors Chris (aka @dogsbody). I'm still a little short on a couple of AM items that would make this project complete, however may still be able to get away with what I've already amassed so far. Being Australian, its a no brainer that I've chosen No. 467 Squadron as this 'Credible' WHIF build. The initial establishment of ten Tiger Force Squadrons to be based in Okinawa included No's 9, 617, 106, 467 (RAAF), 83, 97, 75 (RNZAF), 207, 419 (RCAF), & 428 (RCAF) Squadrons. I've read about No. 460 (RAAF) Squadron also being earmarked, however this may have been part of a secondary force to be assembled later on if required. Mr. Lucas writes that 467's Lancs would have been equipped with the 8000 Ibs bomb doors, no dorsal turret and FN82 rear turret with .50 cal US MG's. British Pacific Roundels where also specified and these had a dark narrow outline to show up against the white painted fuselage and top wing. Dull Red Squadron codes and serials were also documented as the colour to be used. OK, that's it for the main WHIF historical notes, let's now talk about the kit. For this GB build I've chosen Hasegawa's 1/72 Grand Slam Lancaster. I still have plans to build a version of this kit, so will keep all the other bits for another rainy day. Hasegawa's Lancs are quite nice and thankfully come with a few items that will prove useful for this build. The slight negatives about it are well documented and include and overlarge tail wheel, the canopy escape hatch is in the wrong location and an overall fairly basic cockpit. I'll source a new tail wheel, hopefully correct that cockpit hatch and will most probably leave the internal bits as is. The 8000 lbs bomb doors will be donated from the Airfix Mk.II kit (will need to source an extra set?) as will the FN82 turret which is spare. Ideally I'd like to add a set of Lincoln wheels and vertical tails however don't have these as yet. Might see if I can add a 'wants' post in the appropriate section. Apologies for the overly long intro, here's some photo's to see what's going on. There's plenty of references to confuse things so please feel free to check in from time to time to see how I'm getting on or (most probably) neglecting another started kit! Cheers and regards.. Dave
    12 points
  15. Thanks Giorgio Not as nasty as it seems on the close up photos, thankfully, but it will need some attention. Both good ideas Ian and Bill, but I've already started on the ART route (see below) Sadly I had the settings wrong and the tape caught on the blade: Despite that I pressed on and pressed the lower frame on: and on the other side. I'll paint the tape and see how it looks before I sort the blending.
    12 points
  16. Thanks Giorgio, Roger, Ben, CC, Johnny, John, Terry and Michael Ah, camera mount, good idea Hendie, that might help stop wobbly photos Greebie morning. Start of the ?power sockets: Landing light: Nav lights, Hmmm. I got out the 'Nigel swords' for the colour, realised they're too tiny but used the profile of the tips: …to get something close: Untitled by Ced Bufton, on Flickr Can you see them? No? Quite.
    11 points
  17. The R-4 was the first true allied helicopter, undergoing initial trials at sea in 1943. Recognising its potential as an ASW convoy protection weapon, Britain ordered 240 of them for use by the RN and RAF, but with the end of WW2 this order was reduced to 45, most of which went to the Fleet Air Arm. The US Army and USCG also used R-4s, the former for jungle rescue in Burma and the latter for coastal patrols. Limited in the ASW role by their small payload, precluding a useful weapons load, the RN’s R-4Bs were used in a variety of Fleet Requirements roles (such as radar calibration) and as ASW aircraft until eventually replaced by the much more powerful Dragonfly. Well I definitely had some fun with this one. Who would have thought something so small could be so frustrating. Most of the kit is OK, with some nice etch parts, but that acetate canopy deserved a little more engineering thought from MPM. I managed to fudge it in the end and now have an important addition to my early helicopters collection. FredT
    10 points
  18. A brace of Spitfires from the Land of the Midnight Sun... --John
    10 points
  19. 10 points
  20. I love that egg above 😁 Well here’s my second entry to the gallery. An Eduard 1/48 P-51 ‘Master Mike’ This build has a Eduard PE interior set, Löök IP, resin wheels, and resin exhausts. Hope you like Looongggg build thread here
    10 points
  21. Not so much more work on the top this weekend, overall coat of Future in preparation for the decals. Some panel line wash added. Canopy un masked Colin
    9 points
  22. I've just added the final touches to Airfix's classic 1/24th scale Stuka. A great kit to build, and despite its age it's crammed full of detail, has some lovely surface detail and goes together really well. What you see here is as it comes in the box, with the only additions being some Eduard belts and a bit of extra plumbing in and around the engine. All paints were Xtracolour enamels. Ju-87 B-2 'Stuka' - 3/St.G2 - Northern France, August 1940 Picture 1 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 3 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 4 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 7 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 6 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 8 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 5 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 2 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Picture 9 by Thomas Probert, on Flickr Happy modelling, folks! Tom
    8 points
  23. At least it should fit o the shelf! That WAS the easy part... I hope the Lerwick is more accurate! This is certainly going to be interesting Markus, I wouldn't recommend it as a first vac for anyone! The way this is going it's likely to put people off them rather than encourage them, but I'm having fun, so all's good! Probably more of the latter Stuart! No chance! I never use the fin and stab from vacs, I make my own from sheet stock! Have fun with the line check, at least you only do this stuff twice a year! I must admit though it's much more fun when you do it regularly and get used to the routine! I do hope you aren't referring to Ced's tool! Good to know, although I have them the right size now so not needed. It's getting busy in here! Welcome all! On with the latest installment of "Tales from the Table Top". Part 3: The Sorry Saga of a Scaleplanes Vac" When we last saw the FE8 she was feeling very sorry for herself. Methinks it was an inferiority complex caused in part by having undersized parts. Understandable! To remedy that, some minor surgery was required. The first step being to sand off the edges where extensions were needed to give a flat joint surface. The areas needing attention were the trailing edges and tips of all 3 wings. Once that was taken care of, strips of .020" x .060" were added to the trailing edges, and .030" x .100" to the tips. Huh? I've seen people mention it in the past but that's the first time I've had a post posted without clicking on "save"! That was done last night, and some Mr Dissolved putty added to the joints. This morning I started sanding them down. First I tackled the lower wings, the inner trailing edges were cut back to the correct positions and the new edges shaped. One done To make sure they match, I marked the second one using the first as a template. That, and the upper wing, were then treated the same way. Since the parts also have a concave underside, usually perfect for an early aircraft but unfortunately not this one, I did a skim of Milliput fine. It was rolled out into a thin sausage and stuck on, the flattened out using plenty of water, before finally using a scrap piece of thick plastic sheet, chamfered to an edge, as a scraper, again with water to smooth it out and level it off. It's a very messy process and difficult to see how well it worked. Hopefully it will be ok and i can always finish it off with PPP now that I have a solid base to accept the strut pins later. The wings now look much better and the span is acceptable top and bottom. On to the nacelle. Again the kit part is not good. The front end is too low, the cockpit opening is too low, and the cockpit sides are too vertical. Apart from that it's not too bad! Sort of like this This is how the cockpit should be and this is what we get You'll see I've already added some Mr Dissolved Putty to help with the adjustment. That was before I though it through. The first issue was to correct the nose. After pondering a while I settled for cutting it and bending it up. I made a small cut either side, forward of the cockpit and inserted small spacers. Here's the cut on one side Bent upwards Much better! and with the spacers glued in, it was held in place with dolls house pegs. The gaps have been filled with more Mr Dissolved Putty and they have been set aside to set over night. One final pair of shots to show the corrected wings over the plans. Oh look, it's Happy Hour! Time for a beer. Thanks for looking in everyone, have a great evening! Ian
    8 points
  24. Su-34 Fullback - HB 1/48 plus Reskit weapons, exhaust and bomb rack, Eduard PE and resin whells, QB resin canards and tail grilles, Master pitot and electrostatic lightning arresters Some wires and rivering scratch Camo - Syria Latakia AFB October 2015 I invite you
    7 points
  25. Dear Modellers, Well the old trainer needs no introduction here, you could find and hear them everywhere. Also in The Netherlands the Klu ( Koninklijke Luchtmacht) had 220. They were used as trainer and for laison work till end 1962. Fortunately some are restored and still flying ! 😊 I build my model years ago, I was very glad that Monogram brought out this model, to replace my old Aurora model, which could not fly with those horrible flat wings. And I could use this model as a starting point for other conversions. (Wirraway) I found some videos of a real one, enjoy ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scKxPekVmxw With kind rgards, JohnHaa
    7 points
  26. Got my A-20 Havoc completed today! Rather pleased with it! I was midway through the build when i started on the Grumman Duck, if i remember rightly i was waiting for my paint order to arrive from Sovereign Hobbies; and i i was not disappointed, nor did i have to wait long! I wanted to try making a twin engine and a bi-plane, and its turned out just fine; had a bit of a tussle with the top wing but i got it in the end. The wing braces from the upper wing to the fuselage were far too long! I had a bit of cutting back to do and decided on locating the top wing on the two braces outermost and had to use supergloop for that because glue from the tube and liquid poly were not able to hold the wing on and let me adjust its fit. You've followed the A-20 Havoc build so i'll show its pictures first.... The model turned out very nicely indeed! The view from above front of an aircraft always makes an aircraft look quite formidable, i think. 84th BS, 47th BG in Tunisia. The same squadron is pictured for two aircraft in the decals kit so i did a merge on them because i like the squadron insignia. The little leg at the back under the model looks inconspicuous, i was gonna paint it but it was better left plain. The kit didnt feature the little nav light on the top at the tail root, but the paint plan for the decals had it so i drilled a hole there (but not right through) and topped the hole with red paint and stuck on this excess bit of clear sprue as a light! The little aerial on the nose wasnt in the kit either and was a last minute add on! I reverse engineered the propeller attachment because i dont like propellers built on too early; there's always a chance they get busted during the build so i fitted a pin into the front of the engines and drilled out the back of the props, that way they dont have to be fitted until later on!💡 Saves me having to fix the things! There are decals for the props but i just do it myself with paint and then tidy it up! You can see one of my scratch machine guns in this picture! I used a merge of the decals as they were from two different aircraft of the same squadron and used the North African Campaign waist marking, pleased with that! The paint plan for this aircraft took a bit of adjusting! First of all i painted it all over in OD and Light Aircraft Grey undersides; then i added the Desert Pink but there was too much of it, i had also painted on too much Forest Green; its only supposed to have small patches of it on the edges of the wings and tail. I also had to radicalise the pink because i had big patches of it; i had to paint some of them with squiggly curves with Olive drab and then second coat both colours, I needed a couple of attempts because my pink areas needed more squiggly patterns. In the end i got it just right! And now for the Grumman Duck. It was an easy enough build to do but the top wing was quite troublesome; i started calling it the "Grim Grumman"! Okay, here goes.... The underwings i wanted to feature with dark blue scallops along the leadings edges but i just couldnt get it right and ended up just painting over the mess i'd made with white. I decided to feature 'wheels down' for this amphibian. they are very small parts and VERY tricky to handle, in the end i made up each leg but with no wheel yet and used liquid Poly to hold the leg up in the fuselage and once it had set i then attached the lower leg supports with Supergloop. The decals supplied with this kit were unusable. The only original ones are the red stripes on the nose, the rest i used from other decals i had left from other kits and a sheet of Star and Bars with optional red stripes for each size. This is my first bi-plane, ever! I didnt get around to them last time i was modelling. I just took it easy, thought out the stages i needed for fitting the upper wing. I discovered that the struts were rather too long and the big N struts were broken; i superglued them back together on a glass plate (its actually the glass front of an old Halogen garden light but its excellent for gluing on because nothing will stick to it!💡). I assembled the wing floats taking care to mount them the right way around as there are left and rights to them and their rigging! I pre-painted alot of this model so that i could access the awkward areas before the model was finally assembled; i only had some touching in after the parts were fitted. Pre-painting also included the fuselage because its dark sea blue from the top but intermediate blooo from the sides and white underneath. It took several attempts to finally attach the upper wing but in the end i got it. I also added a stripey arrester hook! (is in the kit). I had to reverse engineer the propeller assembly on this model too; its far too intricate to have a prop already fitted; i cut the end of the socket that the prop is supposed to be glued into and enclosed it by adding a piece of plastic to the back of the engine, this way the propeller can be removed if i need to. It was an intricate build for me; my big ol' clumsy fingers tend to make a buckle job of things that include very small parts but at times i surprise myself! My hands can also shake a bit! I have learned to do deep breathing for a couple of minutes before i start working on a build, i close my hands into a fist on the intake breath and open them on the exhale and every second breath in a tighten the fist, hold it for a few seconds and release; i do this for about 2 mins and when i'm ready to start my hands are nowhere near as shaky as they were! It works! My first bi-plane happens to be an amphibian! Dont know if it floats yet!🤣
    7 points
  27. Weeel probably not as good as you may hope.. I seem to have forgotten to take pix of the VAST amount of work I did sanding the seat down to an acceptable thickness and then getting the thing to fit inside the cockpit. And all the plumbing and wiring that I very deliberately didn't do. But here are some pix of the motor. Just a little grunge, this bird is meant to be clean and shiny. It also reminds me why I hate shiny... The kit went together extremely well. Almost no putty was used The only fit problems were, I suspect, self created. All paint is Tamiya spray bomb stuff. I did luck out as the model came with an aftermarket set of decals from Starfighter. (#3202) I heartily recomend them as they went down almost perfectly! I did just the smallest amount of weathering grunge and I am debating with myself on how much paint chipping and exhaust staining to do. Very little I think as this is a peacetime warbird and would have been kept very clean. Also it's easier... Thanks for the comments and all criticisms are welcome!
    7 points
  28. So the main paint job, jury is out on this one, the Hataka paints looked good on a test run but I suffered from tip dry even with adding a lacquer paint retarder, lots of over spray and a bit of bounce back on a few things. Colours look good and close to the real deal but it need tidying up yet, its far from finished yet. More later today. Dan
    7 points
  29. Thanks all for comments & advice! I did repaint the Gnat - but I felt like moving on with this one. I feel like weathering might bring it together little bit more - not necessarily worried about the colors as such, but the slightly too big color separation. But then again it tends to look kinda better on a model even if not 100% accurate. I don't know. We will see how it all turns out Did some work on the landing gear. Still not sure where everything should go - but I've come to expect that with this kit I will have to find suitable places to glue those rest of the bits once I put the main landing gear on the plane. The main landing gear struts used to have locating pints but they were devoured by the sprue gates. I can already see lots of swearing, Nothing to correctly align the landing gear doors (or any indication where anything should go) but we will see. I can already see CA glue sticking in fingers and wrong bits, bits falling on the floor (and getting glued down)... sigh... Also had a setback. I was at a hobby event yesterday and thought I'd try Mig's Lucky clear coat - but I was quite unlucky with it. Once I got a nice coat on, it just started pulling apart and pooling on the corners I'm not sure what the heck happened! Been using the same airbrush with other acrylics stuff (Vallejo) withouth any problems. I put another clear coat on (Vallejo) - but it hardly made any difference. With light sanding and reapplying the clear coat I got it 'ok'. Not as it used to be but hey ho, this is modelling, sometimes stuff happens... Moving on, I masked the areas for metal around the engines.... ....and black for the wing leading edges. Masking tape off.
    7 points
  30. I have been putting this on off for a while as I had a few easier builds to go on with. Now they are nearing completion I decided to get this one back on track. The main thing putting me off was making the search radar. I had been thinking about how I was going to make the shape up, initially I was going to use laminated plastic sheet then I recall picking up some green stuff some time ago. I dived into the supplies and found it. First I made base template out of sheet styrene and then mixed the 2 part putty together. I shaped to roughly what it should look like and then left it to set. At this time I also made up the two SLAR antennas Next the radome was sanded and filed down to refine the shape and SLAR also tidied up A test fit showed the radome was too deep so I removed the base plate template At this time I started to add the mounting fixtures for the SLAR and the turret mount that lives on one of the main landing gear sponsons And then time to a test fit is the parts, the search radar radome received a couple of more sanding sessions to reduce the depth again as I thought it was still too large I was glad to find the kit included some of the antennas I was planning to scratch build so that will speed things up. I need to putty in the windscreen and mask off the clear parts in prep for priming soon. That's all for now.
    7 points
  31. Dornier Do 17 Z-1, Werk.Nr. 1155 DN-57 of PLeLv 46, Ilmavoimat 1944 ICM 1:72 kit Kit supplied decals enhanced with spares box national insignia - ICM supplied were a "minus", oh no, actually a "plus" Brush painted using Humbrol and Revell enamels Eduard mask set put to good use with that greenhouse! A lovely kit and as I don't have a kit yet for the BoB GB I might consider building another one! Edit: oh by the way, this Dornier survived the war! Now hands on the Lanc, and then back to the Nordics for a third one, later in the spring! V-P
    7 points
  32. Here is my entry for the group build. I will be using A Model's Lancaster B.I/B.III kit supplemented with a Kits World Warbirds decal sheet to represent one of the East Kirkby Heritage aircraft. by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr Here are the kit decals and a set of vac-form canopies kindly donated by @Hockeyboy76 - cheers buddy by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
    6 points
  33. In this, the sixth and final instalment of the review of the aircraft and squadrons assigned to RAF Wyton from 1980-1995, I will examine those airframes either preserved on base, scrapped, or disposed of at the end of their military service from 1991 onward. The drawdown of Canberra operations began in earnest in December 1991 following 100 Sqn’s conversion to the BAe Hawk. 231 OCU wound up their aircrew conversion role in April 1993, followed in October 1994 by the disbandment of 360 Sqn. 39 Sqn relocated to RAF Marham in December 1993 taking with them their 5 active PR.9s, plus 3 x T.4s and 2 x PR.7s handed down from 231 OCU and 360 sqn upon their deactivations. According to my researches, some 26 Canberras were scrapped on base at RAF Wyton from 1992 onward, until the final example was broken up in 2006. Two intact and airworthy examples were sold to private owners, three nose sections were saved and acquired by private collectors, and one airframe was scrapped off site. It is also of interest to note that at one time there were three Canberra gate guards on display at RAF Wyton together with a Comet C.2R also present on the airfield. Unfortunately, a misguided change of RAF Policy in 1989 meant that henceforth there would be only one gate guard per station. Sadly, the unique ex 51 Sqn Canberra B.6 (mod) WT305 was scrapped on site. Canberra PR.7 was acquired by the Gatwick Aviation Museum, leaving just PR.9 XH170 extant. Former 51 Sqn Comet C.2R XK697, which had been on loan to the local Air Scouts since 1973, was also scrapped on site in 1987. There is a story of triumph and tragedy concerning the two Canberras that were sold in airworthy condition at the end of their RAF service: Ex 100 Sqn Canberra TT.18 WJ680/CT was placed in open storage at RAF Wyton until sold in 1992 to Ron Mitchell. In 1994, WJ680 by now registered on the British Civil Register G-BURM, and assigned to the Canberra TT18 Display Team, performed its first civil display at Duxford. Subsequently Temora Aviation Museum in Australia acquired the aircraft in May 2001. Upon acquisition, the Museum repainted the aircraft to represent those flown by the Royal Australian Air Force 2 Squadron during the Vietnam conflict. The aircraft is maintained in an airworthy condition and remains the only English Electric Canberra flying in Australia. Canberra T.17A WJ607/EB, formerly assigned to 360 Squadron, had been de-commissioned and registered G-BVWU on the British Civil Register on 22/12/94. It was brought to South Africa to join the fleet of classic warbirds at Thunder City, based at Cape Town International Airport and registered ZU-AUE on August 25, 1995. Tragically on 30 September 1995, the aircraft took off from Cape Town International on a test flight up the west coast. In the vicinity of Yzerfontein, the aircraft turned inland and suddenly spun in leaving a crater in the ground; nothing of the aircraft remained. Although the two crew members were wearing parachutes, there appeared to be no time to eject. Former Wyton based Canberras that continued in service, or were preserved in full or in part from 1989 on. Ex 360 Sqn Canberra T.17 WH664 seen withdrawn from use at Wyton in Dec 1991. It was scrapped in situ by July 1992. The blue ‘X’ applied to the nose, signified those airframes withdrawn from use and awaiting subsequent scrapping. T.17A WF890/EJ as she appeared in July 1993. Scrapped entirely by March 1995. T.17 WK111/EA on site at Wyton and dismantled during 1995. The nose section was obtained by a private collector at Witherton but has evidently since been scrapped. Former 100 Sqn Canberra B.2 (WJ567)/CC seen at Wyton in November 1991. Finless ex 100 Sqn TT.18 WH718/CW awaiting final disposal at Wyton in June 1992. TT.18 WH981/CN photographed at Wyton in May 1992. This aircraft was unusual in being the only example withdrawn from service and earmarked for scrapping, but not disposed of onsite. It was purchased by a scrap dealer at Stock, Essex and transported there for subsequent scrapping in 1995. Ex 100 Sqn PR.7 WT538/CJ in April 1991 ahead of being broken up later that year. TT.18 (WK127)/FO had been consigned to Battle Damage Repair Training (BDRT) at the end of its service with 100 Sqn in Feb 1989. It was subsequently scrapped on site in September 1993. PR.7 WT519/CH. This airframe was the last to be broken up at Wyton, surviving as a hulk on the north side of airfield until final scrapping and disposal on 14 Feb 2006. Although of somewhat poor quality, this rare shot from July 1984 depicts former 13 Sqn PR.7 WJ817 then in use for BDRT. At the time this photo was taken in Aug 1992, WJ817 - by now coded FU, had been relegated to the Wyton Station Fire Section. It was destroyed completely by March 1995. Former Wyton Gate Guard, ex 13 Sqn PR.7 WH773. This airframe was cared for and maintained for many years by the locally based 2331 (St Ives) ATC Sqn. Following the changed RAF Gate guard policy restricting each station to just one gate guard, WH773 was sold in 1990 to the Gatwick Aviation Museum. Another former Wyton gate guard, Canberra B.6 (mod) WT305. This unique survivor, operated by 51 Sqn until its retirement from active duty in 1976, was unceremoniously destroyed on site in October 1989 following the gate guard policy change. It is seen here looking pristine in August 1981. Ex 51 Sqn Comet C.2 was preserved at Wyton at the end of its flying days in 1973. It was loaned to the Wyton Air Scouts before being scrapped in September 1987. The nose of scrapped T.17A WH646/EG was obtained and preserved by the Midland Air Museum at Coventry in 1995 and is seen there in this photo from 2006. Another of the three nose sections saved from former Wyton based Canberras. Ex 231 OCU B.2T WE113 - now on display at the excellent Tangmere Air Museum, and until 2011, owned by a private collector in Woodhurst, Cambs. Upon retirement from RAF service, ex 100 Sqn TT.18 WJ680/CT was registered on the UK Civil Register as G-BURM, and flew for several display seasons in the UK by the Canberra TT18 Display Team before being exported to Australia. It is seen here at RAF Marham on 23 June 1996. The sole survivor. Gate Guard PR.9 XH170 as she appeared in 2017; the only tangible reminder of RAF Wyton’s illustrious history as the ‘home of the Canberra’. Thanks very much for looking in, and for all the comments and ‘likes’ on the series so far. Scanning and cleaning slides that are often 30 or more years old is a slow and laborious process, but one that I have found very rewarding during my convalescence. I sincerely hope you have enjoyed this trip down memory lane as much as I have preparing it. Special thanks to Alpha Delta 210 for the ongoing encouragement and support, and to Jabba for the additional material on the 51 Sqn Nimrods. Mark
    6 points
  34. Afternoon all.....a quick turn around project made from a defunct Dragon Stug III kit that had lost it's parts to install the gun mantlet etc. So, what to do with it..........convert it to a support vehicle. I didn't get to take images of the build so no build blog. There was not much to it other than build a new upper structure and canvas topped hinged cover. The addition of additional racks on the sides for fuel and additional supplies. Nothing special as regards tracks ( rubber band that came with the kit) or PE...used it as a filler between projects.....and some experimenting in weathering etc. Hope you like.
    6 points
  35. Kit - Academy 13288 (2014 reissue) Paint - Mig acrylic OD modulation set, Tamiya acrylics. Decals - Kit (Designed by DEF Models, printed by Cartograph) Extras - DEF Model mantlet & barrel, Italeri, Tamiya & Masterbox accessories. M10 GMC Régiment Blindé de Fusiliers-Marins, French 2nd Armd Div. Outside Paris, August 1944. ...and with it's 'brother in arms' the Tamiya M4A3E8. It's hard to explain, the M10 is just one of those subjects that has a very definite appeal to me, but I would never commit to building one until recently because I knew my 'skills' (such as they are), would never come close to building what I saw in my head. It's only in the last two or three years that my AFV 'skills' have started to coalesce, so in 2018 I took a deep-breath, bought the kit and then left it alone... still nervous of it y'see. Started work finally on it just before Christmas and have been grabbing a few sessions here and there for the last eight weeks or so. The Academy kit is NOT a straightforward build, a lot of planning is needed especially in the early stages where building-up, masking and painting the interior sub-assemblies has to be done in such a way as to minimise re-painting and re-masking over and over again. The fit of the turret halves was a nightmare as they seemed to be entirely different sizes, but with some good super-glue, some pulling and twisting and a fair chunk of swearing it did work-out. The kit-supplied gun-barrel is terrible and best consigned to the bin in my opinion - the kit-specific barrel & mantlet set from DEF Model is a massive improvement and highly recommended. I decided before I began that the finished model would have very little in the way of stowage as historically the RBFM vehicles that took part in the Paris Liberation skirmishes drove only short distances from their lager areas, fought then retreated for the evening to start all over again the following day !. Also I recently finished an Easy 8 in 'road march' configuration and fancied something a little more 'minimalist'. As ever thanks for taking the time to look and / or comment, please feel free to ask any questions or suggest any improvements. Next for me is a Eurofighter and then an M41 Walker Bulldog, both for GB's elsewhere on t'interweb. Have a great weekend, folks, best from NZ. Ian.
    6 points
  36. This is the special edition of the Hasegawa kit, which includes some white metal parts for the 20mm cannons, flame damping exhausts and the different antenna for the top of the canopy. As usual the Hasegawa kits go together without much fuss with the decals and detail being just fine for this scale. I did add some seat belts to the kit though. The aircraft depicts one of Nachtschlachgruppe 9 in Italy that carried out night harassment raids against the allies. Camo was done free hand.
    6 points
  37. Well, how about another “what if” history project? This started off as just a regular build of the Hasegawa Kyushu J7W1 Shinden. This aircraft had long fascinated me, with it’s unorthodox canard design and sort of “Star War”ish appearance. I wanted to build the prototype which actually was test flown in the waning days of the war. I've read that it made three 15 minute flights and grainy film from that time seems to confirm that. The build was progressing along nicely when disaster struck. I was using a desk lamp to speed up the paint drying. I left the plane unattended for a few hours and when I returned, the lamp had dropped down several inches and had melted the upper rear fuselage. Yeah. Ooops! After much gnashing of teeth, a “fix” came to me. I could try to adapt the aircraft to turbojet power which was a long-term plan for Kyushu anyway had time allowed for this development. I used body shop spot filler putty to build up the damaged area, deleted some features, added a few more and jumped whole hog into this conversion process. I used the canopy from some long lost P-47, cutting it in half and using the rear-most section for the windscreen. A drop tank from an unknown source was pressed into service too. The prototype had featured some rather long and spindly landing gear to provide ground clearance for the six-bladed prop on the pusher radial engine. I didn’t need that clearance now and so decided to shorten the three landing gear. That led to another problem. When gear were shortened, the wheels wouldn’t mate with the recesses in the wings and forward fuselage. So, I had to relocate the attachment positions for all three. I also shortened the rather tall vertical stabilizers/rudders and created new broader rudders. I envisioned that the J7W1 would’ve evolved into the J7W2 with jet power and then later into the J7W3 with the bubble canopy, shortened rudders and lowered stance. The planes would’ve been delivered to units in an unpainted form with Hinomarus intact and field expedient camouflage then applied. This model was built back in 2004 and upon close inspection, reveals a lot of flaws. I had a bit of trouble blending the new canopy into the fuselage and in general, the build shows my limits then as a modeler (and those haven’t changed as much as I would like now, lol 😉). But, it was my first conversion of any kind and my first “what if” project too. I imagine this aircraft based in Korea, circa spring of ’47. It’s wearing 5 kill markings, 3 American victims and two Soviet kills, making her pilot a “Japanese Jet Ace”. I hope you enjoy my little World War II fantasy exercise. Thanks for stopping in and taking a look! Gary
    6 points
  38. Ikarus IK-2 , Royal Yugoslav AF WW II fighter -1/48 scale AEROPOXY resin kit Old, early 2000's Aeropoxy resin kit, discontinued for few years, its my second build of same kit, first in NMF/Silver scheme. Not too complicated build, if not count the undercarriage construction. Parts removed from casting "vaffer" , cleaned and primed with MrSurfacer 500, Partialy assembled, primed and sanded, Canopy trimmed and glued, using 2K epoxy . Painted, ready for decals, Finished, Thanx for looking, More pics at RFI
    6 points
  39. I'm heading into uncharted territory. I've started to add details to the exterior of the bridge superstructure. This included laying out & drilling a lot of holes for handrails & other details. Unfortunately, what seemed like an easy job, resulted in some rework. A few holes ended up out of location due to my drill (or drill operator ) wandering, quite noticeable compared to long lines of the correct holes. This meant filling the incorrect holes with CA glue, sanding the glue smooth, & redrilling the holes. The reworked areas are visible in the last two photos, below. Also, I've also been experimenting with how to build those small details on the side of the superstructure as shown in the next photo. I don't know what the function of these things are. I considered leaving them off the model, due to their size. They are quite visible in most of Brave Borderer's photos, so I decided to trudge ahead & try to come up with something that looks the part. I'm guessing these parts have something to do with mounting & connecting the temporary fuel tanks mounted beside the bridge superstructure, as shown in some Brave Borderer photos, . The next photo shows my first attempt at building these parts. I've used the model train handrail knobs again, along with Evergreen plastic channel & angle. Once they're painted, hopefully they'll look close to the parts shown on the actual boat. What do you think? Thanks for looking. John
    6 points
  40. Possibly, but I rather doubt it. As I’ve already said, as far as I am aware no firm information about what was planned for Ark has ever been published, other than vague references to fitting radar. It would probably have been as much a refurbishment as anything; she might have been only 3 years old when she was sunk, but she’d been worked really hard in that time, including several near misses with bombs, plus a Swordfish that went over the side carrying depth charges which promptly went off, buckling some of the plating near her bow. There are also several references to her steering gear in the logs towards the end, so that must have been giving her engineers the run-around. (Exactly the sort of thing that gets damaged by underwater shock). If she’d survived another 3 years, say, they might have changed her round down (as they did the Illustrious class) and her accelerators (what we call a catapult - for them, catapults were explosive things in cruisers and battleships, but carriers had hydraulic ‘accelerators’), in both cases to allow her to operate heavier aircraft like the Barracuda, Firefly and US designs. But I doubt they’d have done so as early as late-41/early-42 - not least because that would have meant a longer refit, and they needed every carrier they could get at that point, with Illustrious having been refitting in the US for much of 1941, and Formidable also being repaired from July - Dec 41 after being dive-bombed off Crete. I suspect Ark would have been relatively limited in the extent of likely reconfiguration, because of the way her funnel uptakes (which eventually killed her) constrained the hangar, and because she didn’t have an armoured flight deck. But that is all conjecture. It’s possible that detailed plans for the refit (even if only in outline) are somewhere in the National Archive, but given her fame and the amount that was written about her even during the war, if it exists I’d have thought someone would have found it by now.
    6 points
  41. The war sledge is finished ,i painted the finnish crosses on, as in the few pictures I've seen of captured ones the crosses are a bit roughly done , I've tried to make it less boring and white, and this is the result ,ok i agree they probably didn't get this bad ,maybe this one was involved in a lot of action ,in dirty snow.🤗, Cheers all, one of the best gbs I've taken part in , most enjoyabe. Glynn
    6 points
  42. Got busy with the sanding sticks today. Here's how the nose and tail pieces have turned out: Pretty happy with my first go at 3D printing parts! Since I took these photos I've given it a coat of Mr Surfacer and will now focus on getting a good surface finish. I had been thinking about re-scribing lost detail but these panel lines are too deep and will look way too prominent under a natural metal finish, so I'm going to fill most of them in. cheers Julian
    6 points
  43. So this is what Karaya missed regarding the tail struts, they are not N struts, but go like in this rough sketch. References point out to issues with tail vibration or oscillation, thence perhaps the intended remedy. There was also a wire -not drawn- triangulating the "normal", more external struts: And yes, definitely Karaya missed a single strut that goes from the engine to the fuselage. advancing a bit diagonally, similar to this one seen in the Sea Lion III:
    6 points
  44. And we're done! More pics in the gallery. This was a fun kit, and the decals were great too. Thanks for hosting this Group Build and the kind words.
    6 points
  45. I've made a start on the Revell build, not much to this really. I have still not decided whether to build with undercarriage up or down, the simplest build would be up, would like it simple as I will be giving it away. I cannot help to think that I should have painted the interior a black colour, and also inside the nose section. The fit hasn't been great, and there was lots of flash on the sprue, but managed to clean it up.
    5 points
  46. Nice progress Giorgio! However, knowing how much you like your detail accuracy, I wonder if I should mention that those p.e. belts are fairly basic and there was a bit more strappery on a real Frightning seat; Please feel free to completely ignore me... Keith
    5 points
  47. Sorry for the delay,...... been a bit sidelined lately what with running out of paint and other things,.....but back on with it now,....... the Dark Green camo has been given an extra coat (thanks to a heads up by Gregg, ) and the nose has been painted black too,...... then Humbrol 35 Gloss Varnish was brushed on ready for the decals. For decals I`m using an Xtraecal set for the 35th Anniversary RAF Herk complete with wing walk markings (and some spare for the extra fuselage length) plus Modeldecal/Xtradecal letters, numbers and titles for the serial/codes etc. As you can see the tip of the refuelling probe has snapped off and to be fair it lasted longer than I expected,..... it will be stuck back on at the end of construction! Cheers for now Tony
    5 points
  48. Sword Grumman TBM3W Avenger of VS881 Royal Canadian Navy.
    5 points
  49. Just sorting the .05 cal mount. Cheers Dan
    5 points
  50. Pottering along, shuffling through the residual tasks .. This weekend an audit of work remaining to finish off the cylinder cowlings: The requisite rounds of painting were successfully finalised on the trusty peg-jig: These little things are quite fragile egg-shells, so to give them best support while micromesh buffing I glued their wooden vacform buck to the end of a skewer: .. so I can then slip each one on ready for a shoe-shine: By weekend’s end I have 4 of 9 so buffed. Miscellaneous other minor tasks were attended to in between, including painting her toenails! (the jig has been dusted off ... the moment when floats meet plane may yet arrive!)
    5 points
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