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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/10/2017 in all areas

  1. Hi everyone,thought you all might like to see the collection of our late member Ronnie who sadly passed away in september 2013,during the latter years of his illness Ron was unable to continue modelling or participate in the forums ,consequently many of his models which were built over a long period of time have never been posted before.This seems to be a good time to show them as Rons widow is shortly moving to Australia to join her family and the whole collection is being shipped with her,fingers crossed they survive ok.Sorry if picture quality is not that good as there are reflections in the cabinets plus my photographic skills are not that great.Thank you Ron for 50 years of wonderful memories. Michael. DSC00435 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00436 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00437 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00439 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00438 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00441 by michael hobday, on DSC00442 by michael hobday, on FlickrFlickrDSC00440 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00443 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00445 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00444 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00447 by michael hobday, on DSC00449 by michael hobday, on FlickrFlickrDSC00446 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00450 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00453 by michael hobday, on DSC00454 by michael hobday, on FlickrFlickrDSC00452 by michael hobday, on DSC00456 by michael hobday, on DSC00457 by michael hobday, on DSC00459 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00458 by michael hobday, on FlickrFlickrFlickrFlickrDSC00451 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00461 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00460 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00455 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00462 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00466 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00465 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00463 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00467 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00472 by michael hobday, on DSC00473 by michael hobday, on FlickrFlickrDSC00471 by michael hobday, on FlickrDSC00474 by michael hobday, on Flickr
    34 points
  2. This is Airfix's very nice 1/48th scale Hurricane kit, I really enjoyed this build. I added a few details to the cockpit and gun bay, improved the landing lights by open the structure around them, removed the cowling Dzus fasteners and replaced them with a beading tool, added Brassin wheels, used the Aires exhausts which had to be cut apart and glue back together in the correct place as it has the exhausts are too far apart. Painted with Humbrol enamels and decals from Xtradecal.
    28 points
  3. Trying to locate some photos after my computer went AWOL found these old ones from about 10 year ago so thought I would share beefy
    16 points
  4. Hello mates! Here is my little blue Marine Corps Grumman Cat in 1:72. Marine Air Group 33, US Marine Corps, Pohang AB, Korea 1952. I bought this in the nineties and finished the build in 2001. I did a lot of detailing, scribing and extra stencil decals, otherwise it is straight from the box. This was a really good kit at that time, with very realistic outlines. I only changed the cross section at the rear. I hope you like it too! Cheers!
    16 points
  5. Hi all, This is my first ever model aircraft build. I chose the new tooling of the Academy 1/72 F-15E from the 333rd FS out of SJ airbase. Straight build out of box, painted and decaled. Apologies for mediocre image quality. I just ordered a light tent on Amazon, and will repost pictures once I have a chance to use it. I began this build in the middle of August, and ran into many issues, like dropping the assembled kit into a pool of plastic cement, and melting the piece where the NMF is up top of the aircraft. I then made it all the way through my build, and proceeded to use an acrylic wash on top of an acrylic sealer coat (future). So, I scrapped that kit (using it as my test-bed) and began a brand new one, same kit, lessons learned. This is the result. It certainly is not perfect, and round two was no walk in the park, but she is done, and I think she looks halfway decent. Let me know your thoughts (good and bad)! Enjoy!
    13 points
  6. Interesting trivia question: When was WW1's last 5-victory air 'ace' declared? The war was over in November 1918. Allowing for the 'dust to settle'...and considering the well-known efficiency of military bureaucracies...it might have taken a while for reports to be processed and paperwork to make its way through channels, right?. So, what, maybe 1919-1920? Maybe 1922 at the outside? How about 1965? (A full World War, a 'police action' and several military 'interventions' later....) Born in 1896, Charles d'Olive enlisted in the US Army Signal Corps in 1917 and became a member of the first class of US pilots trained for WW1, soloing at Chanute Field in May. After being sent to France for operational training, in August 1918 he was posted to the newly-formed 93rd Aero Squadron near Vaucouleurs to fly the SPAD XIII. He scored the new unit's first victory---a Fokker D.VII, near Vieville-en-Haye---on September 12, thus earning the right to decorate his aircraft #24 with the Squadron's newly-created 'Indian Head' unit emblem (which he'd actually had a hand in designing). He went on to score three more victories (two shared with another pilot) on the very next day, and another a month later. Toward the end of October, he was appointed to the 141st Aero Squadron as a flight commander. For the three-victory engagement---in which d'Olive and another American pilot engaged and out-fought a formation of 5 enemy planes---he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in action. Unfortunately...due to a clerical error in recording his victories...Lt. d'Olive was only credited for two of his three September 13th kills. Thus he was 'officially' one victory short of the five required for 'ace' status. While undoubtedly disappointed, he didn't dwell on it; the war was over and he had a life to get back to. He returned to the US, started a family, and went on to become a successful businessman. In whimsical moments, he would occasionally wonder what happened to the 'third Fokker' from the battle for which he won his DSC. Fast-forward to the mid-1960s. Driving to work one day, d'Olive happened to hear a news story on his car radio regarding the upcoming deadline for the U.S. Government to close out service records for WWI veterans. He took the opportunity, and made arrangements to have his records reexamined. During the official review of his personal records, it was noticed that Lieutenant d'Olive's DSC citation reflected three kills, but the official record from the engagement on September 13, 1918, tallied up only two. He petitioned the Air Force, and his record was integrated between the citation and the other records. In 1965...47 years after the fact...Lieutenant d'Olive was finally declared a WWI Ace. Beloved by his friends and family, honored and well-respected in his community, and a proud member...at long last...of the American Fighter Aces Association, former 1st Lt. Charles Rudolph d'Olive died of cancer in July 1974. Though not the most aesthetically beautiful of WW1 fighters---having once been famously described as looking like 'a cigar butt between two clap-boards flying in close formation'---the SPAD has always been my favorite of the era: partly because of its association with so many of the American squadrons and pilots, and partly for its reputation as a sturdy, 'get-the-job-done' machine. It has been reasonably well-represented in all modeling scales, dating back to Revell's ancient 1/28 kit (which is still available). Hobbycraft's 1/32 SPAD XIII---now apparently (and sadly) out of production---is a little gem of a kit. Though not without a sinkhole or a bit of soft molding here and there, it is both well-detailed and well-engineered, with excellent fit overall. Though lacking any engine, the cockpit is reasonably complete, with separate intruments (and two-layer faces provided as decals), controls, and a convincing seat (but no belts) included. Exterior fuselage detail is particularly fine; and the main and interplane struts are among the most petite and 'scale' thickness I've ever encountered. Having said all that...I scratchbuilt much of the cockpit detail, simply out of my love for this particular 'aeroplane'... and the fact that the Memorial Flight Organization in France has posted glorious color photos of their restored original Kellner-built SPAD XIII online, showing nearly every detail, inside and out. A true treasure-trove for the obsessive modeler! Other than the interior---and the added camera/bomb compartment door, just aft of the cockpit on the port underside---my build was mostly OOB. I did add drains for the under-nose oil-cooler and beneath the cowling for the radiator, and the visible feed line from the reservoir built into the upper wing center section. I also added my favorite SPAD detail, the 'emergency fuel jettison' in case of an emergency landing: activated by a pull-ring on a cable extending back to a handle in the cockpit, it's simply a soft-soldered strip---looking very much like the 'pull tab' on a modern soda-can---on the underside main fuel tank, between the landing gear struts. The five-color French camouflage scheme was painted with 'home' mixes of Tamiya acrylics, based largely on color photos of the Smithsonian's carefully-restored Kellner-built 'Smith IV' from the 22nd Aero. After experimenting with several techniques to try and replicate the peculiar 'sheen' of the WW1 French fabric pigments---which contained as much as 25% aluminum 'flake' powder, to offer protection against degradation from sunlight---I finally found a method that produced a convincing-looking finish. I added a bit of Tamiya Aluminum to Future/Kleer at a ratio of about 1 part acrylic paint to 20 parts floor finish, and hand-brushed it on, mixing the solution frequently as I worked. It gave the same sort of faintly-pearlescent sheen as seen in photos, without the aluminum tint being obvious or even visible except at super-close range. (I later oversprayed the 'fabric' areas with a mix of Future and Vallejo Matt to get the right satiny near-matte appearance.) 'Metal' panels on the original aircraft were painted in oil-based Ripolin paints, rather than the dope of the fabric areas; these colors were close to, but not an exact match, for the respective dope colors, so I 'fiddled' my Tamiya mixes accordingly. Roundels and rudder stripes were from the kit's old-but-good decal sheet, though with the pronounced 'French blue' (blue-grey) portions overpainted in a sort of artist's-oil glaze to a more 'insignia' blue. Numbers, stencils, and the 93rd Aero unit insignia were made up based on online images, home-printed on my faithful HP inkjet, and sealed with Testors Decal Bonder; printed on white decal stock, they required some careful trimming (and a touch-up here and there), but went on mostly without issue. The green portion of the squadron wing stripes was masked and painted, with thin red strips from decal stock. The complex rigging is a combination of fine music-wire for the cross-bracing between struts, and EZ-Line for the (double) flying- and (single) landing-wires. 'Wrapped' portions are sections of polyimide tubing threaded onto the EZ-Line. Hardware came from several Eduard etch sheets (for the Roden SPAD VII, and their generic 1/32 'turnbuckles' set) super-glued to the pre-measured lengths of EZ-Line, with the brackets carefully 'snagged' and 'pinned' in place as struts were installed. It all took a bit of forethought and planning...but went fairly straightforwardly...and proved surprisingly strong. [The last was tested...entirely unintentionally...when I managed to accidentally drop the model when it was about 90% complete. Fortunately, it was a 'low altitude' and relatively low-impact crash; even more fortunately, I somehow managed to resist the impulse to (a) weep, or (b) hurl the 'wreckage' against the nearest wall. (And I came very close to both.) After about ten minutes...and a few deep breaths...the damage proved to be daunting, but not devastating. No damage at all to the fuselage, since it 'hit' nose-first (cowl not yet on). One wheel snapped off at the axle, and the gear legs on one side a bit askew---all easily fixable. More challengingly, the top wing snapped off...but all but one of the EZ-Lines were still attached. Most struts broken in half...and a few unaccountably vanished into the ether, never to be found again. I made new struts, and slowly and methodically super-glued everything else back into place. It's not quite as 'clean' as the first version...but almost everything managed to end up more-or-less square and properly aligned once again---a testament to the kit's design, I think---so I can't much complain.] Between the five-color camouflage scheme and the red-white-and-blue markings, it's one of the most colorful big-scale pieces I've ever done...and I must confess I'm hopelessly in love with it. The moreso since it survived a near-miss due to my own relentless incompetence. Also, as a longtime admirer of Charles d'Olive's remarkable story, I hope it's a fitting small tribute to the 'moral' of that story: never give up. Not sure if Wingnut Wings will ever do the SPAD up 'right,' but even if they don't, I have one more of these in the stash, to ultimately do as Ray Brooks' 'Smith IV.' (I did 'doubles' of all my scratch-built interior parts when I built this one, so the interior is ready to roll.) 'Smith IV' will require a bit of modification to replicate the 'pocketed' lower wingtips on that NASM machine, and replace the Vickers guns with Marlin m.g.'s. I already have the Tom's Modelworks etched set for the wing pockets, but I'll have to scratch the Marlin guns, which is a relatively easy task. I also have an idea for what I hope will be a cool little display base for this a/c...which I will share separately, if it comes out at all as I envision. Thanks for looking in, and I hope you enjoy the pics.
    13 points
  7. Hi folks. You guys must be getting bored of these but I'll chalk up another completed Sabre. Here is my interpretation of my recently completed F-86E Sabre in 1/72. Not much to say really; Hobbycraft kit that had its wings backdated to pre 6-3, wing pylons moved inboard and the gun-sight replaced. Model finished using Humbrol Metalcote 'Polished Aluminium' paint and kit decals of 'Lt Col. Ed Heller' aircraft 'HELL-ER BUST X', 16th FIS, Korea, 1953. Thanks for looking. Stuart
    12 points
  8. My recently finished builds are mostly Hasegawa 1/200 kits,and these are the first that came off the assembly line. This was one of Hasegawa's 2in1 kit releases and offers to build 3 ANA versions to be build,although you have to decide which one of the Triton Blue version you want to build. The bare metal underbelly or the all grey underbelly, like the TriStar was before retirement in 1995. I opted for the very first TriStar in the "Mohican" scheme as they were delivered in 1973 and the "Triton Blue" last flight livery with the all grey underbelly As for all Hasegawa LL200 airliner kits,the build is straight forward with no issues at all. I really love those kits as they offer easy,fun builds with quick results. The only thing I changed were the engine exhausts on the Triton version,which had to be shortened to match the later version engines. The Mohican version was left with the longer exhausts as offered in the kit. Painted entirely by airbrush using Revell and Testors enamels and coted with my Media Range Color protection spray. The windows were filled with Krystal Klear.The cockpit windows were painted inside black as the empty cockpit looked a bit off through the clear cockpit windows. Thanks for looking.... And group shots of the 2 TriStars...
    11 points
  9. The clues have all been there if you look in a 'Ted Rodgers 321 game show style'... Three of the main roads going to the Telford show are the M54, the A5 and the A442,.. ..add up all the fours and you get 12... add the 5's and the 2 and you get 12...a Squadron maybe?.... ...then there's the event itself - could be described as a sort of modeller's 'heaven'?.... ...well 'heaven' rhymes with Devon. Telfords's not in Devon, but Paignton is.... ....and Paignton is 208 miles from Telford..... 208,...another Squadron?.... ....then there's Telford itself,.... Telford begins with a 'T' and 'T' rhymes with 'C'.... .....the scurge of the Sea are Pirates...... ....and another name for a pirate might be a .......B********?.. I can totally see where the expectations arose.
    10 points
  10. I've just (almost) finished this kit. I loved every minute of it and will certainly build more. I used the Eduard 'weekend' 109G-6 ERLA boxing, combination of Barracuda decals and Eduard national markings and stencils. I took some photos just in case it gets destroyed during its visit to Telford... image027 by Matt Low, on Flickr image020 by Matt Low, on Flickr image028 by Matt Low, on Flickr image032 by Matt Low, on Flickr I've already spotted some touch ups required, but am pretty pleased with the result. Matt
    9 points
  11. 5. Oh based on a intial cad view the xxx is yyymm to long/short so the kit is unbuildable
    9 points
  12. Hi all, Just rolling out, for the second time, my French AD-4N. This model was my first after returning to the hobby only 4.5 years ago following a break of nearly 35 years! I originally finished her as I would have done many years ago but more recently, after gaining more knowledge of new techniques, I’ve given her a make over. The main changes being the addition of aerials and weathering/panel lining. She is the excellent Hasegawa kit, originally an A-1J (I think – my memory!) and I converted her in my way to a French machine. She is depicted as 127888, coded 21-LE of Esc 1/21 based in North Africa. These machines were all dirty all of the time so a great subject for me! Nowadays she is (as far as I know) with the Kalamazoo Aviation History Museum and flown as USN/127888/B. What did I do/use (if I can remember!): Hasegawa A-1J Skyraider kit (1/72) Rebuilt the aft cockpit with Plastruct rod Cut the side door, after filling panel lines, with a Tamiya template. Window drilled and plugged with Kristal Klear. Added modified wing pylons (out of the kit) Used Hobbyboss F4U under belly tanks plus a heavily modified Hobbyboss F-84 wing tip tank. Each had a seam line added in Plastruct square rod. Combination of Zotz and Berna decals Uschi aerials plus the top-fuselage vertical from a house broom! Top fuselage intake from a MIG Painted using Humbrol enamels – 11 Silver, 34 Black, 2 Green, and others. Glosscote and Mattcote to accentuate the stains. Dirtied with Tamiya Weathering powders and Flory dirt canopy finish by a wipe with meths. I forgot to add that any builders of a French Skyraider should get the "Les Skyraiders Francais" book by Sebastian Guillemin. Well, I hope you like her as much as I do! Martin added further images (11/01/19)
    8 points
  13. The last of the Hasegawa bunch off my production line for the moment... This 747 sat on the shelf of doom very long.Actually planned as British Caledonian 747-200 with General Electric engines,it ended up back in the box when I realized that the Caledonian decals were impossible to apply. A few months ago I found the nice Liveries Unlimited decal set for the Air China 747 fleet,so I decided to save the Jumbo and redo it as a Cargo 747. In my spare part box I had a complete set of Pratt&Whitney engines and so the project was on. I repainted the fuselage and put all the pre-build parts together,decals on and the refurbished 747 will now find its place as a frighter version in my collection. Unfortunately,Liveries Unlimited missed to include the side cargo door on their decal sheet,so I had to find one in my spares.Help came in the shape of an 1/144 DC-10 cargo door which fits surprisingly well... Hasegawa's Boeing 747s are very nice and detailed. They produced the 747-100/200,747-300 and the 747-400 and also added individual engines depending on the airline markings they had included. I still have a larger number of Hasegawa 747s in my stash waiting to be built. Cheers,
    8 points
  14. Hello again! As promised here is my 1/48 Hobbyboss F4U-1 Corsair on its scratch built display plinth. I wanted to capture the look of a sun bleached, beaten up Corsair waiting for the next sortie.
    8 points
  15. Whatever the subject, one must admit that the Italian designers got class! No matter it is in their DNA! So when Italy received the DB 605 leading to the magnificent "Series 5"(Fiat G55, Macchi 205, Reggiane 2005), some of the most beautiful airplanes were born. The "Saggitario"has always been my favorite despite that she was the less product of the three, but the lines of this horse are absolutely a piece of art. The plane depicts here carries the "Spauracchio" insignia designed by Beppe Biron, and the plane belongs to the 352° Squadriglia involved in the defense of Napoli. DSC_0002 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0003 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0004 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0005 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0006 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0007 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0008 by jean Barby, sur Flickr DSC_0009 by jean Barby, sur Flickr
    8 points
  16. Finished! The Matchbox Boeing P12E in the livery of the 18th PG, Wheeler Field, Hawaii... A fun build as all matchbox kits are. Simple enough for a child to do yet enough in there for anyone to fiddle about with scratch building, new decals, rigging, etc... Paints were rattle cans (Humbrol Light Olive, Humbrol Trainer Yellow) and some Vallejo for the little things (tires, prop). A bit of oil pinwash on the prop and some detail on the wings. Rigged with .005 stainless for the main rigging and EZLine for the tail. Apologies for the Soviet airstrip...I was fresh out of palm trees and volcanoes... ...and looking good next to her cousins on the shelf... --Thanks! JDCM
    8 points
  17. Some men are born great, and some have greatness thrust upon them, John. No thanks. I would have been perfectly happy with girls, as I intended to raise them no differently than I will Winston and Grant (which is to say: with great emotional distance and loads of casual neglect) but right now there are all sorts of Capital-N Notions about how one has to raise girls, whereas I get the impression most people find boys rather embarrassing and wish they'd go away, which means very little in the way of unsolicited advice (aside from the sublimely stupid "teach boys not to rape," which I imagine works at least as well as stern injunctions not to murder people). In fact, it would hardly have been possible without you! Am I correct in thinking the rudder should have the Polish national insignia on it? Anyway, I actually did a little work on the kit tonight, but Flickr is down, so you'll have to take my word for it. I was very saddened to read that John Hillerman, the American character actor who played Higgins in Magnum, P.I., passed away today. I have a special fondness for all character actors, who are in general the soul of whatever they appear in. Ronald Koertge perhaps said it best in his poem "Sidekicks": They were never handsome and often came with a hormone imbalance manifested by corpulence, a yodel of a voice or ears big as kidneys. But each was brave. More than once a sidekick has thrown himself in front of our hero in order to receive the bullet or blow meant for that perfect face and body. Thankfully, heroes never die in movies and leave the sidekick alone. He would not stand for it. Gabby or Pat, Pancho or Andy remind us of a part of ourselves, the dependent part that can never grow up, the part that is painfully eager to please, always wants a hug and never gets enough. Who could sit in a darkened theatre, listen to the organ music and watch the best of ourselves lowered into the ground while the rest stood up there, tears pouring off that enormous nose. This weekend is the Butch O'Hare IPMS show nearish to my house on Saturday, and while it's hardly Telford, I'll be making my way out there with my friend Josh to fritter away some money on foolish pleasures. Next week, Mrs P and the kids are in Michigan, so I may get some modelling done, or I may sleep. I'd take the whole week off work, but I also have to attend Social Media Week Chicago to hone my craft and meet "influencers" and "thought leaders". Blech.
    7 points
  18. Moby Dick I once read Herman Melville's Moby Dick, thinking it would be a stirring, thrilling, ripping yarn of adventure on the high sea. Hmmmmm...note how I say I only read it once... and only then just got through it by the skin of my teeth. Anyway, here's how I ended up with my own 'great white whale'. Exactly the same Dulux '1 Step - primer, sealer & undercoat' as i used on the Mig 15 and chosen for exactly the same reason - it was in the shed at the time! I should add however that it actually worked really well on the Mig so there's some logic behind this selection. Here's the big moment when the first primer goes on. I often have a bit of a weird feeling at this moment. After several months of looking at these assorted bits of wood and plastic I won't see them again - ever! (Unless I look at the previous pages on Britmodeller of course). I just slap this layer on really thick and fast as this layer is going to be heavily sanded and thick primer can help fill' small surface irregularities. The only spot where I had to be a bit careful was on the side of the casemate, especially around the flood / vent holes. This is wood primer so it's probably not a good idea to get too much on the plastic. Slap some on the conning tower. Technically it's probably too early in the build sequence for the conning tower to be primed as there's quite a bit of work to go here, but i want to see what the whole submarine looks like in one colour. A logical build sequence must suffer for my impatience. My impatience to see... MOBY DICK! - "Thar she blows cap'n Ahab!...'' And here is Moby shown against a more flattering background - perhaps the Red sea? Anyhow - from here things go back to the old routine - sanding, sanding, sanding. Until we get this... or this - if you prefer the stern view. Interestingly enough - when AE1 and AE2 passed through the Suez Canal en-route to Australia on their delivery voyage, they were painted white in an attempt to reduce temperatures inside the boat. So this is actually a 'correct' colour scheme. Maybe I'll just post this in the RFI section and be done with it... Best Regards and thanks again for the interest shown. Bandsaw Steve.
    7 points
  19. Hello All, Here's the Phantom that I tried but failed to finish in the 24 hour GB earlier this year. I was hoping for some outdoor shots but it's too late in the year now, so I took some photos at the bench with my phone: And with my Airfix F-111 from the GB - I was expecting the Phantom to be a lot smaller but it is not: Thanks for looking, Adrian
    6 points
  20. Hello! Here is one of my models. In building I used Eduard whells set, Q-M-T photo etched set, Master Pilot Tubes, Ejection seats Neomega, Reskit Matra -155, In painting I used MR Hobby paints. Weathering- oil dots and washes. Decal- Modeldecal.
    6 points
  21. Hi all, Sorry I've not been around much for the last month or so, a lot going on with work, travel, and a project that I can't talk about yet. But I did find time to paint some figures over the past week which has been very good for the soul. These are one of the two teams from Shadespire, which is a Warhammer Fantasy/Age of Sigmar off-shoot involving tactical combat with miniatures and cards. The game is very good and the figures are possibly even better. They're single-pose clip fit which means that they're quite easy to paint disassembled if you take care. Except for big sword guy (Severin) who had to have his sword arm cut off so I could get at the inside of the cape. They're metallic (mainly Alclad Pale Gold) so very shiny: The sword blade and hammer faces are graphite powder over a thin layer of Boltgun metal, which polished up so well that it reflects the rest of the model It wouldn't have been possible to do this without separating the sword as it's quite a messy process and the cape needed to be pristine. The other team members are Angharad Brightshield and Obryn the Bold: Annoyingly the ringed planet against a nebula on Angharad's pauldron is partly hidden by the shield. I re-posed it slightly to open things up a bit but I need to take another photo to show it off properly. Anyway, hope you like them! Cheers, Will
    6 points
  22. Finished this Tamiya kit in no time,had to be the easiest tank I have built,kept the paint work very simple just wanted to represent a bit of a dusty tank with little if no mud,and heavy wear around the hatches also placed some items around the tank just for added interest,all will come off when it goes on the shelf.I put up a pic of the figure that came with it and I have to say he has the happiest face I have ever painted on a figure(should not have been so happy if he knew I was going to paint him),also enclosed a pic of the real deal,that gave me some inspiration.Thanks.
    6 points
  23. Hello to all, I made this model, the Chevy Bel Air 1957 at 1/25 scale, from july 2015 to march 2016. I wrote an article about it that was published in the french edition of Tamiya Model Magazine in july/ august 2016 (n°249). You can order it on the T2M site for more informations about this build. For this model, I used as documentation mainly the videos that resellers, american generally, do and post on YouTube. Making screen captures, I could get photos, then zoom on details, and so, making a pics library. The kits from where my model was built are the Revell (US, bought on internet) and the AMT, both at 1/25. I bought first the AMT, but when I saw how poor was this kit, I tried to find a better one. The Revell was better indeed, even if it had to be improved a lot too, to get a convincing model. However, the AMT engine was better, that is why I decided to integrate it in the Revell kit. What a lovely car! I was inspired a lot by this light- blue one, that Jeri Drager (Dragers Classic) showed on YouTube. Jeri, very kindly, authorized me to post pics of his Chevy... Jeri shows us the interior of the car: I won't represent the belts, that did not exist in 1957. The other main difference with his car concerns the rear bumper... Revell, unlike AMT, gave me the choice of 2 bumpers: the classical one (the one of Jeri's car) and a stock-car version, like we can see on this very nice red Chevy. I chose this option... Alclad chrome on gloss black base was used to get a shiny spare wheel cover. Of course, a good preparation with the Micromesh is necessary to get a very good state of surface... ------------------------------------------- Drybrush technique to get a more realistic aspect of the carpet. The foot gearbox was full scratchbuilt. --------------------------------------------------- Hood: this screen capture will be my reference to improve the Revell's part: Among the 2 kits, only the Revell gives the opportunity to represent the car top down, what is definitely my favorite choice, for obvious esthetic reasons. More, this solution allows to see all details of the dashboard. The hood requires however to be improved a lot (folds, buttons, sewings in angles): I had bought as a precaution 2 ex. of the Revell's kit (the shipping was nearly as expensive as the kit's themselves...). So, I could do this pic that shows the hood before and after corrections. ---------------------------------------------- Enlargement of the speedometer: the decal had not the good size and was quite poor, I chose to print in HD at the right scale this photo. The same was done for the 2 other dials... -------------------------------------------- The steering wheels were unrefined, especially the AMT one... A very delicate job was done to get the slender look of the original. Bare metal foil was used for many details, especially the edges of the sunshades: ----------------------------------------- I made from scratch the fuzzy dice, that was present on the Jeri Drager's Chevy. The antenna is an aftermarket part (Hobby Design ref. HD07-0056). The rubber joint around the windscreen was done with matified Bare Metal black chrome. The windscreen wipers were subject to a special care (see below) --------------------------------------------------- Windscreen wipers: indeed, as the steering wheel, the original were very slender... too much to be made from polystyrene... while the Revell's ones were too thick: I used 1/24 windshield wiper set A from BNA world, very thin: ... getting so a much more convincing result. Notice that I applied a very light coat of blue on the windscreen, to get it bluish... Notice too the little nipples of door opening... ------------------------------------------------ Wheels: the original, very nice! The 3 arm star is totally missing on the Revell wheels, and the black notches too... I scratchmade the 3 arm stars... ... and created notches with a bur, to get more convincing and esthetic wheels: ------------------------------------ Rear mirror view: ----------------------------------------------- Engine compartment: the original, very inspiring: On my build at 1/25: ----------------------------------------------- Underbody: the original: happily, Jeri is very thorough, and made a video of the underbody of the Chevy he was selling... I could so represent with many details the underbody: Mr Surfacer was used to get rough surfaces... --------------------------------------------
    6 points
  24. Just been pointed in the direction of this by a friend - hadn't spotted it myself. I did the same as you in August (look at my avatar) but from Duxford in PV202, and like you, have decided to build a model of the airframe I flew. I currently have two Revell 1/32 Mk IX kits sitting in the stash, as I'm intending to convert one to a 2 seater - whether it will work or not remains to be seen. Scratchbuilding and vacforming the rear canopy will be the hard part, I think- along with moving the front cockpit forward as per the real thing. My airframe has the Bremont logo on it too, and my idea was to use a photo of it printed onto white decal paper, apply it to the model, roughly mask off the letters with blobs of Blu-Tak, and airbrush the camouflage colour around the edges of the decal to blend it in. If the spaces between the letters are just a slightly different colour, I really don't think it'll be noticed. That's my plan, anyway. I definitely don't think anyone will notice in 1/72! As Steve says, there's nothing like building a model of an airframe you have in your logbook... Good luck with it, I'll be watching. Dean
    6 points
  25. Thanks for kind remarks, everyone. Onwards! The level of detail inside this kit means that you simply have to paint it before assembly (IMHO, anyway). I have already mentioned that I have read more than one review / build thread across the Interwebs that mentions tight engineering tolerances - the WingNut Wings sort, where a layer of paint can be enough to compromise fit. So, though it is time consuming, I have elected to avoid that trap by masking all the mating surfaces - buy shares in the thin Aizu tape, cos it is superb stuff! Here we are with all the masking done: ...and here after spraying a layer of (decanted for airbrush) Tamiya primer: I love this stage - all of a sudden it is less about "ooh, look at all that PE" and more about the detail that it provides. Interior Green base coat next, but that might well be post Telford. 2pm at Bill's gaff, I understand...? See you there. Crisp
    6 points
  26. Hi, Here comes my try to make Lockheed EC-121 Warning Star from Rare Plane vacu. Maybe it was better to take Heller, but since I have this old Rare Plane for many years, so I give a try. I started to invest to this project some two years ago, when I started to buy extras to make this build little better. Now I have Caracal Model decals, Plus Models engine cowlings and undercarriage and wheel bays. Fisher Model & Patern radomes, props and tip tanks, Modelshack engines and Scale Aircraft Conversions landing gears. And this part I´m using from Rare Planes box After sanding parts out I started to make reinforcements to the wing and fuselage. Mixing oldschool with new items..not the easiest fix And after more cutting, sanding, glue and tape it was time to put fuselage and wings together: So here I am sanding, cutting and glueing.. and it is too late to turn back now Thanks for looking, Kalle
    5 points
  27. The Lockheed TriStar kit was one of the first in Hasegawas LoveLiner series in the early 80s. It is very accurate in shape,nicely molded and detailed. Apart from the 1/144 Otaki / now also Eastern Express kit,its the only accurate TriStar plastic molded kit. The Cathay Pacific version was released around 1980 and so the decal set offers the original paint scheme complete with the union jack on the tail. The decals were in surprisingly good condition and could be applied with no problems. The build was straight forward and the only modification I made,was shorten the engine exhausts like I did on the All Nippon TriStar. Hasegawa never updated the engines and always included the longer,2nd exhaust version. Cathay Pacifics TriStars served very well for 20 years before they were replaced by the Airbus A330. Hope you like her
    5 points
  28. Finished my second lot of horse mounted figures,did a little artistic licence saw so many with battle damage,thought I would add a little.Thanks
    5 points
  29. Hi folks, After what has been a very protracted build, I present my attempt at the whatif He277B-1. The backstory was going to involve the DB610 engine being made to work, followed by German aspirations for something that could carry a heavier payload further than a He177. During the course of the build, I realised that the Airfix '177 cowlings were significantly smaller than those of the Revell kit. I therefore now think this was merely an attempt to reengine the '177 with smaller engines that actually worked. Backstory aside, here is my cut n shut, comprised of 2 Airfix He 177s, a butchered Revell He 177A-6 rear section of considerably reduced height and 2 upside down E-2C fins. Both fuse and wings have been extended and the armament system has been upgraded. Hope you like it: regards, Martin
    5 points
  30. …or maybe not: Base-Coat-Tastic! Only part-way through did I remember that the section aft of the rear gunner opening will be aluminium. No matter. That lot should be well and truly cured by the time I get back from Telford, so I can then get on with the fun bits. Crisp
    5 points
  31. 4. Hooray - Fantastic! Oh it's x scale not y..
    5 points
  32. I have managed to get the time and energy to put on the decals for the RAAF aircraft, thankfully not as many as the other options. The markings went on ok considering my previous experience with Airfix decals have not been that positive.
    5 points
  33. Where's my buccaneers? Under your buccan hat!
    5 points
  34. Thanks Everyone! The skinning continues... Now I get to add the details.........Later All.
    5 points
  35. Hi, And no.. this build is not dead Against all odds and slowing things this is my progress. Here you can see the wing tip removed as shown in Rareplane instruction. Wrong..too short and again glue and syren is helping to fix this error So here I am and I can see the light in the end of the tunnel:) BR, Kalle
    5 points
  36. But would the Burma ones come complete with crate and conspiracy theory?
    5 points
  37. Good evening one and all. Adding to my little collection of Prototypes, experimental and research aircraft is this my latest model, YF4K Prototype at the time of its' first flight 27th June 1966 and flown by Joe Debronski. The base kit is the Fujimi F4K kit of which much has been written and with good reason, it is a superb kit considering it's age and went together with no real issues. During the build I moved the 2 lower auxiliary doors further forward as per UK Spey Phantoms, adding some detail to the u/c bays and airbrake wells and scratchbuilding new seats, although, I have to admit these may be wrong due to the fact I could find no decent pics of the MB Mk 5 with the sugar scoop head area. No photo etch was used so no mirrors adorn the canopy's. All the tubes were removed and replaced with Albion Alloys tubing. On the paint side of things Mr Colour White for the underside, Humbrol Dark Sea Grey for the top surfaces and Alclad for the metal areas around the exhaust. Everything was sealed with Alclad Gloss Coat The markings were from RAM models sheet of early British Phantoms and were very delicate to say the least, even in water extreme care was needed and using X20A to settle them was a no no, I tried on a never to be used decal and it just disintegrated. Anyway they did settle with the use of Mr Setter and Softer but there is some silvering. Thanks to those whom answered some of my questions regarding this build and helping me finish it. Hope you like her and thanks for looking. Disclaimer; All the usual cock-ups and mistakes apply!
    4 points
  38. Just finished this one. Started a number of years ago, but stalled at the painting stage. Painted with Tamiya acrylics. Unfortunately the instrument panel has come adrift... Gloster Meteor F3 by Caution Wake Turbulence, on Flickr Gloster Meteor F3 by Caution Wake Turbulence, on Flickr Meteor by Caution Wake Turbulence, on Flickr Still upgrading my photo setup, so I'll add some more photos when that's done. Thanks for looking. Andrew
    4 points
  39. #28/2016 Corsario numero uno terminado. Tamiya kit with Aztec decals, Tamiya and Gunze paints, EZ Line for brake lines, plastic rod for antenna. According to fellow Hyperscaler/Britmodeller Marco, the wheel wells and landing gear were also painted in camo. Got that info to late so my dad kept them the way they were. The model shows one of the five El Salvadorian Corsairs that took part in the 100 Hours War or Soccer War between El Salvador and Honduras from 14th to 18th July 1969, the last time Corsairs went into battle.
    4 points
  40. This is my completed 1/48 HobbyBoss F/A-18D, of VFMA(AW)-121 Green Knights, from Operation Desert StormOverall, a great kit, with only one major issue. I had to cut 4-5mm from the section between the front and rear cockpits (and the cowling too), in order for the tub to fit in the fuselage. Other than that, there was no problem.The Meng missiles are excellent, as are the Eduard Brassin rocket launchers, and the Quickboost seats.Another first was using Hataka Orange Line lacquer paints. I used HTK-C037 Light Ghost Grey, and HTK-C035 Dark Ghost Grey.Problems with the original Repliscale aftermarket decals caused a delay in the build. They were supposedly for a Gulf War VFMA-121 Hornet, but some of the grey markings were lighter than the main colour, were they should have been darker. So I had to source an alternative SuperScale set, which were more accurate.The display base is from Coastal Kits Display Bases.So here it is finished. Ian G by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-5 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-6 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-8 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-8 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-10 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-11 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-12 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-13 by ian gaskell, on FlickrIan G-15 by ian gaskell, on Flickr
    4 points
  41. The Ilyushin Il-96 (Russian: Илью́шин Ил-96) is a Russian four-engined long-haul wide-body airliner designed by Ilyushin in the former Soviet Union and manufactured by the Voronezh Aircraft Production Association in Voronezh, Russia. It is powered by four Aviadvigatel PS-90 two-shaft turbofan engines.The Il-96-300 is the initial variant and is fitted with Aviadvigatel (Soloviev) PS90A turbofans with a thrust rating of 16,000 kgf (157 kN, 35,300 lbf). Development started in mid-80s while the first prototype flew on 28 September 1988. The first Il-96 entered service with Aeroflot in 1993.[citation needed] Range with 262 passengers and fuel reserves (for holding 75 minutes at an altitude of 450 m) in a two-class configuration is about 11,000 km (5,940 nmi), allowing flights from Moscow to US west coast cities, a far improvement over the Ilyushin Il-86. A highly customized version of the Il-96-300, called Il-96-300PU is used as the primary aircraft in the Russian presidential aircraft fleet. Four were used by Russian president Vladimir Putin, and by Dmitry Medvedev as VIP planes. The VIP aircraft is operated by Russia State Transport Company.[8] The Cuban leadership use IL-96 300. There were plan to produce a variant dubbed Il-96-300V which would include two sets of Airstairs in it.[9] All pleasant viewing! Regards, Yuri.
    4 points
  42. This is the Hasegawa kit, released in the early 90's and bought by me about 20 years ago. Despite it's age, it's still a great little kit and the French markings included make it a bit different. I think my intermediate blue came out a bit dark, perhaps a drop or two of white in that next time I build something with a USN type camouflage, but otherwise I'm pretty happy with this. The SBD makes build number 9 for 2017.
    4 points
  43. Some more Hasegawa airliners to come off my assembly line. I had a 2 week hollyday leave,and had so plenty of time to finish some part started and shelf of doom kits,that were laying around for quite some time. Most of them I started last year,but due to our house renovation I was forced to shelf them until the work was over.Unfortunately ,since then these kits stayed in their boxes unfinished as I was working on other airliners . So I thought these 2 weeks would be a good time to finish them before starting new projects. The MD-90 kit is a rather new Hasegawa kit,that came out around 1996/7. Its very different in quality compared to the older kits from the 80s.But not in a positive aspect. This kit,like the Boeing 737-400/500 look more like those snap-fit kits with absolutely no surface detail on the fuselage and also no open windows. The only parts with detail are the wings.The fuselage is not the usual halves,Hasegawa decided for unknown reason to divide the fuselage in two horizontal pieces I must admit,when I firs saw these kits I was sligtly disappointed,because the older kits were so much more detailed and accurate. Anyway I liked the paint scheme of the Japan Air System MD-90s,so I decided to have a go anyway. The fit is as usual very good with only minor filling and sanding. The paintwork and decaling was the most time consuming aspect,esp, for the emerald green version. I made a copy of the rainbow decals first to have a template to outline the area for the green part.The instructions suggest to mix green and white but I didn't like this idea.I found this emerald green from Mr.Hobby which looked close enough.On the pictures it looks darker than it actually is. Japan Air System (JAS) chose to paint seven of its MD-90s in a special rainbow scheme.For this task they acuired cult director Akira Kurosawa who created each of the seven schemes. Hasegawa produced 2 2in1 and 1 3in 1 kits ,so one could build up the entire fleet. I was able to get only one of those boxings,so my kits represent aircraft number 3 and 4 of the bunch. They are a real eye catcher in my vitrine and will make fine companions to the JAS rainbow Boeing 777 which I will start soon. Cheers,
    4 points
  44. So I've managed to make some progress on the gear bays, to the point where they are all structurally complete after a rather tedious exercise. The patterns I had didn't help over much, I still had to carefully shape the members to suit the slightly different dimensions of this bay. I'm finding my dimensional consistency is pretty sloppy, but given how small everything is it's not too apparent. The detailed ribbing was replicated using scored and riveted strips of aluminum tape to match the Tamiya detail in the centre bay part. Once that was done I decided to tackle the detailing in the new bay segments. For all intents and purposes the P51D had a chaotic mess of pipework and cabling scattered across the bay. I tried to make sense of it but almost every reference photo I had showed something different. I picked one set of photos I found here http://www.yolo.net/~jeaton/Propplanes/p51/p51.htm and set to work trying to replicate what I could. I struggled on this for a while, ripping out the installed pipework a couple of times due it turning into an unpaintable, out of scale mess. I finally just gave up and went the 'general impression' route with the pipework with the aim of actually allowing me to paint it all up when I'm done. I also added the retract cylinders from brass tube with aluminum tape around the ends. I've tacked one onto the wall with some bluetack. The white bar in the adjacent bay is meant to be the connecting arm. And here it is test fitted together. Starting to come along now, I just need to figure out what to do with the centre section, I suspect more pipes... Until next time!
    4 points
  45. Hi folk's an hour this morning and this far!
    4 points
  46. 6. Oh for god's sake, why didn't they go for a Mk.X instead of a Mk.Y? Everyone knows they'd sell loads more of Mk.X etc. etc.
    4 points
  47. This is the 1/144 MInicraft DC-8-63 kit modified to into a DC-8-55F by shortening the fuselage and using JTD-3B engines from an old Welsh Models kit. The original aircraft was purchased by Affretair (Rhodesia) in 1972 from Seaboard World Airlines but registered as TR-LQR in Gabon. In 1977, it was repainted in the colours of CargOman and re-registered as A40-PA in Oman as a flag of convenience. This effectively allowed the aircraft to continue being used on sanctions-busting flights from Salisbury to Libreville (Gabon), Muscat (Oman) and various points in Europe. Flights in and out of Rhodesia normally took place in the dark of the night and the aircraft was usually kept well out of sight, behind the Affretair hangar. In 1982, it officially reverted back to Affretair (Zimbabwe) ownership and re-registered first as VP-WMJ and then as Z-WMJ . It was eventually sold to Trans Air Cargo Service in 1997 and was scrapped in Kinshasa in 2005 after suffering an engine failure during landing. The decals are home-made. There's a sort of build in progress thread and a couple of additional photos here : http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234937676-minicraft-douglas-dc-8s-in-1144-one-down/ (I'm afraid it's all a bit messy, as I'm trying to build three DC-8s at the same time - not the brightest thing I've ever attempted !) Hope you like it. mike
    4 points
  48. I've been eying the resin DH-91 for a while - now I'm glad I waited! Valom kits can have their challenges, but I'd rather do it in plastic rather than resin.
    4 points
  49. I finished this kit a couple of months ago. Added Ultracast wheels, Master barrels and pitot and blanked over the outboard MG FF ports and changed the under wing access panels to the smaller bulge. Painted with WEM Colorcoats, Xtracrlyix and Humbrol. Eagle Strike decals. Feel free to point out any mistakes.
    4 points
  50. Good evening everyone Rose has gone to bed, after science homework. Not much done tonight I'm afraid First photo shows more interior part being assembled, being careful not to coat them in glue ! Second photo, all the little bits on the underside of the wing to make it easier before the floats go on Many thanks to everyone for their encouragement Best wishes Pat Rose's PA !
    4 points
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