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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/08/2012 in all areas

  1. Hi all just finished the Academy F-14 Tomcat, when I purchased this my intention was to make it from the box, and paint it in the grey colour scheme, along with the sundowners decals. But having looked at so many in the same colour I wanted to do something totally different, so having found some images I went to work. The academy kit wasn’t to bad; I also used a detailed cockpit set from Aires, And the Aires engine detailed set. All paints are Vallejo model air paints, applied with an Aztek spray brush
    3 points
  2. Hi All, Further to sorting out my old built up collection in preparation for this year’s SMW event, I thought I would post some of my older builds for your viewing pleasure. It’s sad really as these seldom now see the light of day and reside in a box in the loft. I built the Frems kit when it first appeared quite a few years ago, Built from the box but used a bit of artistic licence as it has Paragon Resin Jaugar seats fitted to enhance the cockpit area. From memory a nice pleasant build, and did well for me in the comps entered at the time. Enjoy Rick G
    3 points
  3. I took a photo of some typically overcast English countryside a while ago, and recently had it printed by the local copy shop up to A3 size. I blu-tacked it to the wall, sat some models on a bit of railway grass matting and took a few photos. I thought you might like to see the results... Tamiya 1/48 Mosquito Matchbox 1/32 109E Matchbox 1/32 Tiger Moth Eduard 1/48 Tempest Revell 1/32 Spitfire 1 I know it's the same background every time, but I thought of building up a stock of background photos over time if the results are worth it. It's all a bit of fun, isn't it? Cheers, Dean
    3 points
  4. Hi all, just thought I`d show you my 1/48 Hasegawa B5N2 with my attempt at the camouflage pattern worn by the aircraft operating from the carrier Soryu on the 7th December 1941 against Pearl Harbour I normally dread Hasegawa decals but these went on trouble free using Klear as a setting agent Mostly OOB with just a few bits of wire and homemade seat straps hope you enjoy Thanks for looking Cheers Russ
    2 points
  5. I'm a recent convert to figure modelling and this is my 3rd ever effort.
    1 point
  6. Hello everyone, hope you all had a nice weekend. Posting my latest build for you. 1/72 Airfix Spitfire, was going to be a quick clean build but after I dropped it and broke both the aerial masts I changed my mind and roughed it up a bit, not sure if roughing up this particular aircraft is historically correct but hey ho. I've used the 3D-Kits Rotol Spitfires MkI & II set, it included a new seat,control column plus the decals and Rotol prop, they all seemed to work very well. This aircraft was from 54 Squadron, Hornchurch in March 1940. Paints used were a mix of Gunze, Citadel, Tamiya and Vallejo plus washes from Flory models, Mig and Citadel. Hope the pictures are ok, using google web albums for the first time. Thanks for looking and all comments welcome. Cheers...
    1 point
  7. Yet another long-term project is initiated! This a big beast, and I was very surprised when I opened the box and discovered the large amount of plastic :-) But that size is intimidating, compare to a well known example (tamiya Bf109e) Right. I'll make the box-top example, just because Felix the Cat is cool =) (Just a coincidence that a Hellcat, Bearcat, and Superbug bearing those markings have found their way to my stash, honest!) So far i've been messing around in the cockpit and wheel wheels This was the first time with Gunze Acrylic for me, an they worked just as easily as Tamiya. Wow! I think I have found a new favorite paint-maker! A very good thing with this kit is that Hobbyboss has made the wingfold optional That will surely save some grief in the long run! Lastly, here is a shot of the completed armament I must say that the missiles were very nicely detailed! If they are correct is another matter, but in plastic they look very nice. Lets see what happens after a coat of paint or two. And with that, the race to finish before end of August 2013 is on!
    1 point
  8. Here it is. My fourth RCAF Mustang representing 403 Sqn City of Calgary and second new tool Airfix kit to 1/72nd. Alcladded in overall aluminium and coated with Xtracrylic matt ove Klear and those superb Leading Edge decals. The finish represents the lacquered Aluminuim finish and retains the Hamilton Standard Cuffed prop as opposed to the later square tipped version. I have seen a photo of this unit with both types of props on their Mustangs in the same line up
    1 point
  9. Some time ago I started this little kit, it is very fun to build, good fit and a good decal sheet. I allways wanted to do a german one, but a Marinefligger one, until I saw this picture: This meant two things, the first the Starfighter had to be flying and I needed to do the contrails... so how to do this? The contrails had to end somewhere... where? The runway!! Good idea!! That meant that the contrails could support the A/C and be attached to the runway, some good paperclips came to use, those big ones. The rest was was just to enjoy the build... and find a solution to the runway issue... that took more time...the result is this:
    1 point
  10. Got another model finished all bar the weapons and pylons today. It is the Italeri boxing of the Kinetic 1/48 F-16C 'Barak' (Block 40). I have built it as #88-0419 F-16CM Block 40B using the Afterburner Sheet 48-075 Hill AFB 388th/419th FW.
    1 point
  11. Hi all, Just finished this yesterday, WIP thread here http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=234923158&st=60 Its the revell reboxing of the hasegawa 1:48 spit mk IX / XVI What can i say, it was a great kit to build and i recommend it to anyone, i am aware the fuselage is slightly too short but i wouldnt say that detracts from what is a lovely kit. The instructions are a bit misleading on the mk XVI as it does require some modifications to get a mk XVIe but doesnt show them. If anyones interested they are shown in my WIP thread but changes made to the basic kit are as follows: fitted eduard cockpit set for hasegawa kit drilled out bulkhead and scissor link lightening holes modified cannon bulges to move to other side fitted kit supplied 50 cal caps and drilled and fitted brass micro tube hollowed exhaust and cannon tips with scalpel added brake lines from fusewire cut out cockpit door and scratch built one from a can of cider and some sheet styrene (door lock from eduard set) removed spine ID light blanked off MG ports in wingtip and shell ejector ports Paints used were Tamiya XF81/82/83 for main camo and various others for details Kit decals used with micro sol / set and were great, though seeing the pics i should have goe round the radio access hatch with a knife Anyways on with some pics And last one, bit of an adversary shot with the Tamiya 190D i finished before i started this one Thanks for looking, all C&CC greatly appreciated, cheers, Stu
    1 point
  12. Rotor Droop I felt moved to post this after seeing some photos of the new Italeri Wessex 5. A very nice kit indeed, but the moulded-in rotor droop just isn’t right. The 1/72 Italeri Wessex also suffers from the same issue, as do a number of their helicopter kits. If you try to imagine the bending moment caused by the weight of the blade, this will be highest at the blade root, where the total weight of the blade is acting. As you move out from the rotor hub, the bending moment gradually reduces to zero at the tip. This means that the blade droop will be greatest at the hub, and gradually reduce as you go towards the tip. So the ‘bend’ in the blade should be mainly at the root end, gradually straightening out such that there is very little bend towards the tip. Here are a couple of real Wessex pics to show what how it is: These are a couple of photos of Italeri Wessex blades taken from a number of posts to this forum (sorry if you recognise your Wessex here – I’m not having a go at anybody – it’s just to illustrate what the kit provides!). These blades have a drooping curve towards the blade tip end, which would simply defy the laws of physics in the real world. So – out with the warm water and bring on careful bending of plastic!
    1 point
  13. Having built the Airfix 1/72 FRS1 I couldn't really not build a Falklands war GR3 to go with it so picked up the Italeri re-pop of the old Esci kit. I have to say this kit has way more detail than the Airfix kit, but shows it's age in terms of slightly awkward fit. Everything is OOB apart from the pitot tube which is stainless steel tubing and wire. Unlike the Airfix kit the jet nozzles are just fine OOB, however I wished I'd replaced the intakes as the secondary intake doors are somewhat indistinct. I ended up shading them in with a weak mix of Tamiya Smoke. And how not to park a Harrier. Paints are my usual Gunze & Tamyia, with Gunze Dark Sea Grey & RLM 80 for the dark green! Karl
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. Been doing a bit on the wheel wells and struggling for references as usual, so I hopped on plane to Munich, made friends with my new best mate, Joshua Fink who is one of the curators at Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Schleißheim, who very kindly let me loose on their Casa, including up a ladder in to the interior of the aircraft. Sadly I only had my iphone with me, so the photos aren't that good. What an absolutely top musuem though, packed with interesting aircraft and the most knowledgeable and helpful staff I have ever seen. Amazing. here's a taster of the Casa And here's some general snaps:- There's a prize if you know what the big silver beast is (-: Nick
    1 point
  16. A few D model block 25's listed on F-16.net for the Arizona ANG Think a couple of hours peace and quiet with the F-16.net site is what I need to do
    1 point
  17. Thanks Loki. I know. This was the first time I've used a rattlecan. I normally prime with Humbrol 140, and then on with the right colour. As for Halfords I don't think that avaliable here in Sweden. /Bosse
    1 point
  18. That is freaking AWESOME
    1 point
  19. Learjet 24 1:48 History Mention the phrase “private jet” to the average person and one word immediately pops into mind: Lear. Since its first flight in 1963, William P. Lear Sr.'s innovative aircraft, built to replicate the performance and amenities of a commercial airliner, has been tantamount with executive business travel. One of the inventors of the 8-track audio tape, the holder of 150 aviation-related patents and a high school drop-out, Lear abandoned his retirement in Switzerland to establish the Swiss American Aircraft Company (SAAC). In 1959, SAAC began work on Lear's latest invention—a private luxurious jet aircraft with the flexibility to fly passengers and freight in and out of small airports around the world. Lear undertook his bold gamble without the benefit of a market survey to evaluate the consumer demand for such an aircraft, relying instead on pure intuition. Inspired by a single-seat Swiss strike fighter aircraft, the FFA P-16 (flown as a prototype in April 1955 but never put into production), Lear recruited a group of Swiss aircraft designers and engineers to transform the fighter's wing and basic airframe design into the cornerstone of a revolutionary aircraft—originally designated as the SAAC-23 but soon renamed as the Learjet 23 Continental. Problems with suppliers and production tooling in Switzerland compelled Lear to shift assembly of the new aircraft to Wichita, Kansas (under the new name of Lear Jet Industries), where the prototype Learjet 23 made its first flight on October 7, 1963, from Wichita's Mid-Continent Airport, nine months after work had begun on the project. The Learjet 23 became the first small jet aircraft to enter mass production as well as the first to be developed and financed by a single individual. Chemical and Industrial Corporation of Cincinnati, Ohio, took delivery of the first production Learjet on October 13, 1964, one year after its initial flight. The undisputed marketing success of the Learjet 23 spurred development of a new aircraft with improved low-speed handling characteristics, coupled with increased range, size, and speed. Learjet 23s were built from 1963 to 1966 until replaced by the improved Model 24 (the 150th Learjet built), which made its debut in March 1966. The all-metal fuselage of the Learjet 24 was a flush-riveted semi-monocoque design. It was equipped with wingtip fuel tanks that added 364 extra gallons (1,378 litres) of fuel capacity and featured the added attraction of a "T-tail" configuration. Lear Jet again quickly embarked on a campaign to demonstrate the improved aircraft's performance. In the span of just four days, from May 23 to 26, 1966, the Learjet 24 became the first business jet to circumnavigate the globe, travelling 22,993 miles (37,004 kilometres) in 50 hours and 20 minutes of flying time, establishing or breaking 18 aviation world records during the flight. In all, 259 Learjet 24s were produced. The high cruising altitude and long endurance flight capability of the Learjet also made it an ideal aircraft for target towing, photo-surveying, and high-altitude mapping. A number of foreign Air Forces, including Bolivia, Ecuador, Argentina, Mexico, Peru, and Yugoslavia, modified the corporate jet for military missions. Model The model is packed in a rather plain looking end opening box, in brown and blue colours standard to Testors. But unlike some other manufacturers this box is very sturdy. The kit inside is contained in a single poly bag which doesn’t stop the sprues rattling around and as such some parts have come loose, but there is no visible damage. The parts on the “sprues”, such as they are, are not held very securely either. There is quite a bit of flash visible, but the majority of it is around the sprue gates rather than the parts themselves. According to the date on the instructions, this kit was released first in 1998 so will not be up to todays standards of detail. From initial inspection of the parts the white styrene seems quite glossy and hard but the moulded surface details are nicely restrained and well done. The instructions do leave a little bit to be desired as, naturally, they are printed and laid out in the US style of giving wordy instructions in conjunction with some rather average exploded views of the assembly construction. Construction starts with building the nose and main undercarriage, consisting of separate wheels, rubber tyres, oleos, main undercarriage doors, and the lower entrance door. The build then moves to the rear and the construction of the engine assemblies, which consist of the two engine halves, (although the details are rather soft), two nacelle halves with the stub wing integrated to the bottom half, front compressor disc, intake, exhaust. The wing halves, with the tip tanks moulded to them are next, with the addition of the separate ailerons. The interior of the fuselage is next and is in the standard VIP configuration of a rear divan seat, two single seats and a side facing seat, opposite the door for any attendants. The cockpit is built up of the cockpit bulkheads/storage panels, pilot and co-pilots seats, control yokes, instrument panel, and coaming. To the rear of the floor is a bulkhead and at the front the nose wheel assembly is attached. Before the fuselage can be closed up the cabin window and interior assembly are fitted along with the main avionics bay interior. There is a high probability of this model being a rabid tailsitter so try and get as much weight installed forward of the main undercarriage as possible. It may need to leave the avionics out and use the resulting space for more weight. With the fuselage closed up the wing, engine and main undercarriage assemblies can be fitted into position. The horizontal tailplanes, ILS aerials and rudder are then fixed to the vertical tail. Forward, the two windscreen parts and the anti-icing ducts/deflector is fitted, nicely eliminating the windscreen seam. The final parts to be fitted are the forward avionic bay doors, nosewheel doors, keel beam with the main undercarriage doors attached and the clear nose parts for each tip tank. The completed model certainly looks like a Learjet 24, but there are some issues. Externally, the nose looks a little long and thin, the tip tanks look a little skinny too, but these are only visual cues, and measurements will need to be taken of a real aircraft to confirm this. Internally, the nose wheel doesn’t appear to be anything like the real thing as the oleo is not attached to the forward cabin bulkhead and the retraction jack is completely missing. The main undercarriage bays don’t look deep enough to house the twin wheeled man gears. The cockpit is merely a representation and is missing the central throttle/radio console which makes getting into the cockpit seats so awkward. The rivet lines on the wing are also an enigma on the real aircraft, as not only is the aircraft flush riveted, but the paint used is thick enough to cover almost any lumps and bumps. Bill Lear insisted on having the wings perfectly clear of any obtrusions on the upper wings for the clients/passengers to see. In fact the only lines visible are the hinge lines for the flaps and ailerons, plus the spoilers. If the aircraft has anti-icing then the leading edge of the wing needs to be in unpainted aluminium as are the leading edge of the intakes, along with black electrical boots on the horizontal tailplanes. Otherwise the aircraft are generally painted overall white. Decals The single option is for aircraft registration N1CGM with its simple, yet stylish light blue, white and dark blue stripes for the fuselage with separate parts for the upper and lower entrance doors. There is a smallish Stars and Stripes flag for the tail fin under which the registration number is applied. The decals are by Scale-master and their “invisi-clear design. They are slightly matt, but perfectly in register and nicely opaque, which they need to be when applied to the white aircraft. Conclusion Given the faults noted above, the kit looks like it will build into a good looking aircraft. The interior provide does give a nice canvas to add loads of extra detail as does the avionic bay and engines. If custom decals can be sourced then there are actually loads of different schemes that can be covered, both military and civilian. If you’re a fan of business aviation subjects then this will make a nice addition to a collection. Review sample courtesy of UK distributors for
    1 point
  20. lovely! it's a nice kit -i wonder what happened to frems?
    1 point
  21. Wow, you are far to kind to my humble work. Many thanks to all!! Mark, she's the 1/72 Haseagwa (kit D17 if memory serves me right), OOB. Colin, after work I'm gonna get a cardboard sheet to take propper pictures. If the wi-fi connection works they will be up tonight!!
    1 point
  22. The book is 30 years old, and that's what the caption is. The other pic I mention shows the plane in what looks like a forest dispersal area, complete, but slightly sunk in the ground, with undercowl panel open. The pic above shows it later I would presume, note mssing gun access panel and stripped rudder fabric. I would presume it was being collated/disarmed by the Allies [note belt of cannon sheels hanging off oil cooler]. I doubt they are going to push it into a muddy dispersal area and put the gun access panel back on? Notice also Black 16 behind the two seater, with what look like the same fuselage band, as well as the 5th plane back. I'm not up on if training units used coloured fuselage bands, as the 'two seat' Fw190 look like it has one...or it just a Fw190missing it's canopy, given the two seaters hinged sideways. Or is it a line up of fighters at base, which just happens to a derelict 2 seater in the pic? Given the chaos at the end of the war, plus pilots with any sense getting out the way of the Russians, anything could end up anywhere... I don't know. this is why I suggest the LEMB, as that's the best bet for this kind of question. cheers T
    1 point
  23. The first delivery of parts for the wotan arrived care of the german rail system , however on their long ,peralous journy from the White cat works to Gorings mancave the train had come under attack from a lone Supermarine Alegro with its distinktive square spinner damage had been severe as many of the parts were now deformed and full of holes. Work was quickly started to fill in the dents It was also apparant that the slave workers at White cat had sabbataged the parts as no rear exit for the jet gasses had been constructed. Not only would the Wotan not fly it would also look stupid Goring got on the phone to all the spares depots...
    1 point
  24. These have never been posted before, built these this year as a bit of fun, The Sandscorcher was a real challenge to spray and before he barges in and gets upset I must thank Mike for helping out with my paint and masking issues. Anyway enjoy I'm sure the pix will bring back a few memories with a few members. Dan
    1 point
  25. The Bristol 148 was an army co-operation prototype built to the same specification the Lysander was. According to the information in the kit's instructions, it successfully met the specification's requirements but was passed over in favour of the Lysander. Wanting an excuse to test some of African air force decals from the Zotz sheet before using them for an African L-39, I decided to build the Magna kit as a COIN aircraft, as it would fit in nicely with WWII surplus aircraft used in post-war colonial conflicts. After doing some research (i.e. reading Wikipedia), I decided that this Bristol 148 would have been an ex-Force Publique, ex-Katangese Air Force aircraft pressed into the FAZ's ranks. The extra armament would have also been WWII surplus, I guess. The Magna kit required more clean-up and bubble-filling than other kits of theirs I've built in the past, also suffering from an oversize instrument panel. I replaced it with a female copy of a Hurricane panel pressed into Tamiya two-part putty. The Lewis gun was replaced with a Vickers K, the propeller was from the AZ Spitfire VI kit, the cannon from a Hurricane kit and the rockets left-over from a Valom Bristol Buckingam kit. I carved in access panels for the cannon on the starboard wing, as the original 148 only carried guns in the port wing. The decals are from Zotz's Roundels of the World set and the serial numbers from an AML Oscar kit (the Oscar in question was given up in disgust a while ago). The model was brush painted with Humbrol enamels (83/149/150 for topsides, and a 5:2 mixture of 34 and 25 for the underside). I tried out salt weathering on this plane for the first time, though I think it came out rather crude. Thanks for looking!
    1 point
  26. my Huckebein will have a probe for the probe-and-drogue, air-to-air refueling system
    1 point
  27. Hi Loki, Heritage's NEW T10/T12 conversion set has the fueslage and canopy now correctly shaped, like the one Jan is using. (Says the humble maker of the masters for the sets!) Ian would be saying to you... "Buy your's today!" Cheers, Nick
    1 point
  28. Very nice one. I also like the details that make it a Danish one. The other day I read a book about the Fokker DXXI. It seemed no version was the same. http://www.lanasta.com/Shop/product/119/fokker-d21.html The book is in Dutch and has some English translations.
    1 point
  29. Alclad used overall for the finish RG
    1 point
  30. And on with the top colour. I had to unmask the observers bubble as I had a bit of EDSG paint leak under the mask - so I want to clean it of before it really hardened on. Si it needs a re mask now. Paint is Tamiya XF26 Dark grey with a bit of a medium blue added to lighten and blue it up a tad. Thinned with quick shine and applied in 4 thin coats. Just doing some masking touch ups and then it will be varnish time. Cheers Jonners
    1 point
  31. Your build inspired me to buy the Revell IX C/XVI which arrived in the post this morning. My wife answered the door and asked me what was in the package. I told her that it was my new mouse for my computer that I'd been expecting. "A very big box for a small mouse" she said. I just smiled. I've now been told that I have no more room left on my model shelf for any more "stash". I'm expecting a RAF Tomahawk II. Mmmmhh.... Don't know how I'm going to explain that one. A really superb bold and an inspiring one. I hope that my Va turns out half as good
    1 point
  32. Hi from Spain. I saw this model in Escala Española, and I'm yet atonished with it.....Really good painting work on a hard buiding kit....congratulations. Y sana envidia.
    1 point
  33. Soo disappointed this won't be 1:32... Iain
    1 point
  34. You really missed it? She flew last week and did a stint at an NZ airshow this past weekend. There are plenty of videos online but I just discovered this one which is rather cute: David PS - there's an Anson flying in NZ now too.
    1 point
  35. Awesome looking cockpit! and love the fading
    1 point
  36. Well Spence - very sorry to hear that. I guess that MIS's mix of proper articles and detailed reviews finally lost out to the current fad of "glossy nothingness" that seems to be in vogue in certain other magazines. The scene is now free for other mags to become what they virtually are anyway - long advertisements for the manufacturers, edited by toadying acolytes, with little thought given to how the average modeller may work. Our UK modelling magazine scene used to be really, really good, but its been populated of late by those who either joke their way out of any confrontation, or who are just are plainly so interested in mere decoration and self-agrandissement that they ve forgotten what their proper role is: Right down to the point of editorials that laugh at other editors, despite their own lack-lustre efforts. As the production values of these mags go up, their credibility goes down. Yes - I'm biased, yes I'm a bit angry, No I'm not a bit sorry about what I've just written. Cheers Spence - and good luck with the new project, and apols to those who contribute to these mags - its the so-called editors Im gunning for. Jon Kunac-Tabinor, miffed PS to any other editor - I have every issue of your mags going back for at least 3 decades with the oldest. I don't do "Smiths as a library" ( how arrogant is that from you know who you are): I buy, so I reserve fully the right to criticize. And I will, so watch out.
    1 point
  37. What a perfect way to start my birthday...... And now non of you have an excuse, 13th April....... Count me in.
    1 point
  38. That's not a "what if?". That's a "should have been!" Excellent stuff. It just looks so right!
    1 point
  39. Hello to all I have just wanted to let you know about our current project, which will deal with the Westland Lysander. So far I have selected the following 27 Lysanders but I believe that the final number will be around 30 of them. Serial Mk Code letter Sqdn Place Date K6127 Prot --- --- L4729 Mk I --- 16 Old Sarum may-38 R1992 Mk I --- --- Western Desert 1940 --- Mk I KJ-L 16 (AC) Old Sarum, Wiltshire Autum 1938 L4719 Mk I --- 208 Middle East 1939 L4673 Mk I --- --- June 1940 ??? Mk I --- --- used to test air brakes K6127 Mk I --- --- Yeovil 27/071941 a 1944 P1698 Mk II --- --- Feilton Pre War P9105 Mk II --- --- 1941 K6127 Mk II --- --- P9191 Mk II --- 12 Anti Malarial Control Unit Corsica 1944 459 Mk II --- --- Rockliffe, Ontario March 1942 L4798 Mk II HB/X 239 1940 V9576 Mk III AR/N 309 (Polish) Ipswich December 6 1941 T1771 Mk III --- --- A&AEE June 1941 T1508 Mk III --- --- Issoudun ene-42 V9367 Mk III MA/B 161 Tempsford 1942 --- Mk III JR/P 161 V9289 Mk III 357 Mingaladon, Burma February 1945 V9287 Mk III --- 161 Tempsford 1942 1557 Mk III --- --- Patricia Bay 1944 T1445 Mk III K-W6-K 755 NAS Worthy Down 1941-1942 V9905 Mk III --- --- Yeovil 1941 V9547 Mk III BA/E 277 South East England 1942 478 Mk II --- No 5 Coastal Artillery Cooperation (CAC) Detachment, stationed at Torbay St. John's harbour July 10, 1942 As always, If you think that we should include another Lysander (in RAF / RCAF or RAAF) please let me know. My father has working to improve the Airfix kits and here is the progress made so far The first batch will be these Lysander 1) lL4729 Mk I --- 16 Old Sarum may-38 2) P1698 Mk II --- --- Feilton Pre War 3) R1992 Mk I --- --- Western Desert 1940 4) V9576 Mk III AR/N 309 (Polish) Ipswich December 6 1941 Kind regards Santiago
    1 point
  40. Hello to all of you I am sorry for not been posting quite often lately but my father and I have not had too much time for modeling during the latest weeks. Fortunately my father was able to finished 3 more Lysander. Here are the photos: 23) Westland Lysander Mk III JR/P 161 Sqdn 24) Westland Lysander Mk III T1508 161 Sqdn Issoudun January 28th, 1942 25) Westland Lysander Mk III MA/B V9367 161 Sqdn Tempsford 1942 All the 25 Lysanders finished so far. The latest 3 models of this project will be the following: 26) Westland Lysander Mk III V9289 357 Sqdn Mingaladon, Burma February 1945 27) Westland Lysander Mk I LXN L4781 (fitted with bombs). 28) Westland Lysander Mk I LXX N1209 (fitted with cannister) Many thanks for lookings. Kind regards Santiago
    1 point
  41. Hi to all of you My father has completed 4 more Lysande to our series (13 to 16). In this case 3 of them are related with the target tug operations performed by the Westland Lysander. Please note that there are a couple of modification in each model. (different exhaust, different air cool in the front of the cowling of the Canadian Lysander (with skies), etc. 13) Lysander Mk II 459 - Rockliffe, Ontario - March 1942 14) Lysander Mk III 1557 - Patricia Bay - 1944 15) Lysander Mk III K-W6-K T1445 - 755 NAS - Worthy Down - 1941-1942 16) Lysander Mk III V9905 - Yeovil - 1941 These will be the next Lysanders to be built. 17) Lysander Mk I L4673 June 1940 Pregnat Perch 18) Lysander Mk I K6127 Yeovil 1941 (Con la torreta en la cola) 19) Lysander Mk II P9105 1941 (Blackburn Stieger wing) Kind regards Santiago
    1 point
  42. Hi My father has been working hard on these Lysanders and he has made the following modifications on the original kits. Westland Lysander Mk I V9517 - Hanworth Aerodrome - 01/06/1941 Use for tugging a Hotspur glider Westland Lysander Mk II K6127 tested with two 20 mm cannons Kind regards Santiago
    1 point
  43. Hi Here is a little update on these Lysanders. My father has been working hard in order to get the correct decals. In some cases he made them by pieces like the Enamelled Polish Air Force symbol in one fuselage. Cheers Santiago
    1 point
  44. Hi Chris Yes, we will do a couple of RCAF Lysanders. Many thanks for the photos. Yes, my father will do that modification as well as others in order to get a better RCAF Lysander. Here is the progress made so far Many thanks for looking Kind regards Santiago
    1 point
  45. If you're doing any RCAF Mk.II's, you may want to think about adding this mod to the exhaust collector. Chris
    1 point
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