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Review Content

Showing topics in Aircraft Reviews, Kits, Aftermarket (updates/conversions), Decals, Reference material, Armoured Fighting Vehicle Reviews, Kits, Aftermarket, Diorama & Accessory, Reference Material, Kits, Aftermarket, Reference Material, Vehicle Reviews, Sci-fi & Real Space Reviews, Figure Reviews, Locos, Trains & Layout Reviews and Tools & Paint Reviews posted in for the last 365 days.

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  1. Yesterday
  2. Thanks for the info. We can only gain so much info from pictures unless they are close ups.
  3. I generally let the pictures do the talking, but as you have asked the plastic looks quality, the panel lines such as they are are nicely restrained, detail is good and the decals look like they will pose no issues. I did say the decals were printed in house, but on closer inspection they are done by a Ukrainian company Decograph which I cant seem to find any information about, however I note AMP and BPK kits now have decals by them also. Julien
  4. I'm interested in picking one of these up, but it would be nice if you gave us a bit of info on what you have in front if you - what's the quality like if the holding like, panel lines and details and what the quality of the decals like etc? I know you said highly recommended but would be helpful before spending money on a kit.
  5. 71chally

    Westland Dragonfly HC.2 - 1/48 AMP via Mikromir

    Nice review and can't wait to get the Royal Navy version. There were at least five HC.2s delivered, WF308, '311, '315, VZ960 & WZ749, the last two being ex civil WS.51s. I rather suspect the instructions mean Yeovil at Westlands 1950. I have seen pictures of RAF HCs with the winch fitted, which appears to be in the box, so this may add some extra interest to a build. WF311 is the only one I have seen pictures of with the tailplane, so building a different airframe would get you around scratch building it
  6. There will be an FAA boxing at some point no doubt. Julien
  7. corsaircorp

    Westland Dragonfly HC.2 - 1/48 AMP via Mikromir

    Thanks Julien, A must have one, but of course a FAA one ! CC
  8. Westland Dragonfly HC.2 1/48 AMP via Mikromir The Westland Dragon Fly was a UK Built licence built version of the Sikorsky S-51. In the UK these were powered by an Alvis Leonides radial engine developing 500hp. While the Dragonfly was mainly used by the Royal Navy a few were by the RAF in the Casualty Evacuation role. These were designated HC.2 (2 built) and HC.4 (12 built); the earlier type with wooden rotors, and the later with metal ones. It is good to see companies bringing us kits of early helicopters as the are lacking. The kit from AMP (A Mikromir company) arrives on 6 sprues of plastic, four clear spures, a sheet of PE, a set of masks and resin parts for the rotor head. The plastic is more of the short run type but much better than seen before, there is little flash and the detail is better. The clear parts look a little cloudy in the pictures but its deceiving, a little polish up and they will be good. The small white resin parts seem to be made of a more durable material, the type I have seen Eduard use for tail wheels before. Construction starts in the cabin. The seats are made (3 off) and added to the cabin floor. PE belts are provided for the pilots seat. The read cabin bulkhead is then added. The instrument panel and pilots controls are also added. Next up the extensive glazing for the cabin is made up. The front bubble is actually two halves which attach to a central part, The sides are then added. The complete part is then supposed to slide onto the competed fuselage, though I suspect many modellers might tray a different approach. Next up the base for the rotor head is built up. The cabin floor and base rotor head can then be put into the fuselage and it closed up. The glazing is then slid on. The main landing gear is added at the sides along with the entry step rail. The tail rotor is then added. In picture of WF311 it can be seen there is a tail plane with an oval end plate on the opposite side from the tail rotor, however this is missing in the kit. It will not be that hard to make. Next up the full rotor head can be built up. This is quite complex so care will be needed. The blades can then be added. Last up for the main airframe is completion of the nose wheel. Lastly the side paniers to carry the casualties are made up and added. Decals A small decal sheet provides marking for one RAF Machine WF311. The instructions show this as being at RAF Yeovilton 1950. We know this is RNAS Yeovilton, and as the airframe was delivered in 1950 I would suspect this was delivered there, or could be at Westalnds site? The aircraft was used by 194 Sqn RAF (Far East Casevac Flight) and was written off on 16/3/53 when the engine failed. These airframes were fitted with external panniers for carrying the casualties. Conclusion This is something which is overdue, the kit is welcome addition to early Helicopters from AMP. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. On my list definitely!
  10. Percival Vega Gull (72002 & 72004) Civil & Military Service 1:72 Dora Wings The Vega Gull was a development by Percival of their earlier D-Series Gull. The main advantages over the earlier design was the addition of a 4th seat, dual flight controls, and flaps were fitted. The airframe was made wider, the wings longer and the airframe made more streamlined. A feature of the aircraft was the ability to fold the wings for storage. The work was attributed to Arthur Bage's arrival at Percival. The resulting Vega Gull had extended range and payload without sacrificing performance. The aircraft was powered by a de Havilland Gipsy Six engine. As well as civilian operators the Air Ministry ordered 15 Aircraft. 11 were used by 24 Sqn RAF, 2 by the FAA, and 3 by British Air Attaches. At the outbreak of WWII many civilian aircraft were impressed into service in Britain and the Commonwealth. The Kit Dora Wings is a new company to us, and have kindly agreed to send samples for review. As it is this reviewers opinion that Percival Aircraft made some of the best looking Civil Aircraft in the UK, these new kits are more than welcome. Initially Dora Wings have given us two boxings depicting both the Civilian & Military users of the aircraft. Like the Proctor Information and help was gratefully received in the production of this kit from John Adams formally of Aeroclub models which can only be a good thing. Construction is fairly simple just like the real aircraft. The wheels and their spats are the first parts to be made up and then put to one side. We then move to the cockpit. The instrument panel is made form a plastic part with the film and PE making the front of the panel. This is then added into the coaming. Just to go off on a tangent the wings then put together, these are of convention left/right & upper/lower construction. Separate flaps are included as are landing lights for both wings. Now that the wings are done we can move back to the main cabin, the rear bulkhead is installed. Then the controls and seats are put in place, followed by the front firewall and instrument panel we put to one side earlier. The fuselage can then be closed up, and the canopy added. At the rear the rudder is added along with the tailplanes, and at the front the engine front and propeller. The wings can then be added along with the main landing gear. Markings Decals are printed in house For the Military boxing 4 options are provided; L7272 ex G-AFWG Allocated to British Air Attache Buenos Aires, Argentina 1939. ex L7272 Sold to Argentine Government in 1946 P10 Requisitioned by the Belgian Government 1939 N7571 Requisitioned by the Royal New Zealand Air Force 1944 For the Civilian boxing again 4 options are provided; G-AFBC 1952 Kings Cup Air Race, Joan Lady Sherborne. G-AFBW Alex Henshaw, Nicosia, Cyprus 1938. VP-KCC Beryl Markham trans Atlantic flight 1936. G-AEKE Winner of "Schlesinger Race" 1936. Conclusion It is high time that we had some modern toolings of British Civil aircraft from this period Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Depot Areas & Sludge Tracks Weathering set (A.MIG-7470) Ammo by Mig Jiménez More weathering products from those prodigiously productive people at Ammo. This set is six enamel washes and includes A.MIG-1002 TRACKS WASH, A.MIG-1004 LIGHT RUST WASH, A.MIG-1407 ENGINE GRIME, A.MIG-1408 FRESH ENGINE OIL, & A.MIG-3020 METAL SLAG (pigment). This set is designed to compliment the "Fast Method" set we reviewed here. You can of course mix these to create highly realistic vistas. Your artistry will of course play a part in whether you achieve such levels, but this is a good palette to start you railway diorama career or step up a level. Of course there are many other uses for these prducts outside of railway modelling. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Percival Proctor Mk.I (72003) 1:72 Dora Wings The Proctor was developed by Percival from their Vega Gull in response to an Air Ministry Specification for a radio trainer and communications aircraft. Percival made the fuselage 6 inches longer and incorporated larger rear windows. Modifications also had to be made to the seats in order that parachutes could be worn. The prototype first flew in October 1939 and was put into production fairly quickly. Over 1000 aircraft were built, the original 222 by Proctors, with the remainder by F Hill & Sons of Manchester. The original marks of Proctor (I through III) were very much of the Gull design, later ones were enlarged, but the larger aircraft suffered in terms of performance. After the war the aircraft were dispersed to various operators. The fleet was grounded in the 1960s due to concerns about the glued joints in the airframe; though some have been rebuilt with modern glues. They still make good light aircraft and inherited the Gulls folding wing which can make storage easier. The Kit Dora Wings is a new company to us, and have kindly agreed to send samples for review. Information and help was gratefully received in the production of this kit from John Adams formally of Aeroclub models which can only be a good thing. It is also this reviewers opinion that Percival Aircraft made some of the best looking Civil Aircraft in the UK, so these new kits are more than welcome. Initially Dora Wings have given us The Vega Gull and followed this up with the Proctor as Percival did. The kit arrives on three sprues of nice hard plastic, detail is good raised and recessed where necessary. The ribbing on the wings is nicely restrained. There is a clear sprue, instrument panel film, a sheet of PE and a set of masks. Construction is fairly simple just like the real aircraft. The tail wheel is the first part to be made up and then put to one side. We then move to the cockpit. The instrument panel is made form a plastic part with the film and PE making the front of the panel. This is then added into the coaming. Just to go off on a tangent the wings then put together, these are of convention left/right & upper/lower construction. Separate flaps are included as are landing lights for both wings. Now that the wings are done we can move back to the main cabin, Controls and seats are put in place, followed by the front firewall and instrument panel we put to one side earlier. The fuselage can then be closed up, and the canopy added. At the rear the rudder is added along with the tailplanes, and at the front the engine front and propeller. The wings can then be added along with the main landing gear. Markings The decals are from Decograph and look good with no registration issues, there are two decal options provided; P6240 Czech Air Attaché, RAF Hendon 1945 Ex P6240 now D-41 Czech Service, Kbei 1946-49 Conclusion It is high time that we had some modern toolings of British Civil aircraft from this period. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Mike

    Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf.D/B 1:35

    Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf.D/B 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Designed in the mid 1930s to be part of a pairing with the larger Panzer IV, the lighter Panzer III was originally intended to be sent up against other tanks, as well as to push through gaps in enemy lines to cause havoc with supply lines and generally disrupt the enemy's day. Production began in 1937, with few of the early marks reaching series production, using up A through D as prototypes, of which the Ausf.B was used in the Polish campaign briefly before being put out to pasture as a training vehicle along with the remaining Cs and Ds. The suspension was a work-in-progress, using leaf springs until the Ausf.E, which moved to torsion bars that were then seen on most new German designs during WWII and beyond. During the early period of WWII the Pz.III continued to do its prescribed task until the T-34 tore through their ranks, brushing aside the lighter armoured Pz.IIIs and necessitating an up-gunning of the Pz.IV with a new high velocity gun to combat its sloped armour. By 1942 it was relegated to tasks where its light armour and 3.7mm pop-gun wasn't an impediment, such as close support of troop advances. By this time it was clear that it was past its sell-by-date, and that the Pz.IV had much more development potential. The chassis went on to be used for many other developments, some of which were quite successful, such as the StuG III. The Kit This is a re-tool of MiniArt's new range of Panzer III models, the early Ausf.B with crew we reviewed recently here. While it does share some of the larger parts with its stable-mate, there are a significant number of new sprues due in part to the different suspension, but also because of the additional hull parts (stowage and such) that are visible in the box painting. There are twenty seven sprues of grey styrene, plus three separate parts, a further twenty one sprues of track links, and five more of track pins, plus a clear sprue, fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, a decal sheet and the instruction booklet. The usual high level of detail is present, and the modular approach to moulding allows them to produce maximum variants from their toolings. The major difference between the boxings is to be found in the track area, where different suspension units are used, necessitating the tooling of new parts that include the hull sides. The new parts have three leaf spring arrangements, with two Y-shaped suspension arms damped between them, and each arm mounting two pairs of wheels on an additional swing-arm that pivots around the centre. Each wheel has a rubber tyre around the steel rim, and a cup inside the inner wheel allows them to remain mobile after construction if the glue is used sparingly. The large drive sprocket is retained, as is the large idler wheel, although both are subtly different due to design changes. The forward section of the top deck is identical to the previous version, but the engine deck is different, having two side-by-side access doors on the flat section, each having clamshell doors, with the sloped section retaining the single doors of its predecessor. The raised centre section is identical, and the fenders are moulded in one run, but with panel lines and fasteners showing the modular nature of the real things, and some slight differences between the fixtures and fittings. The track links are identical, and are built up in sections nine links, using the perfect spacing of the pins to add them seven at a time, building into two runs of 96 links, one for each side. From my previous experimentation, the pins do hold the tracks together, but with handling they can slip free, so take precautions during handling. The jig shown in the picture is also not included in this boxing, but that shouldn't be much of an impediment, and you won't end up with your tracks glued to the jig. For two decal options there are additional track links draped over the front of the machine, to add extra armour to the area, which are made up and secured in place with PE brackets. Another addition to one of the options is a set of wooden stowage boxes around the rear of the tank, covering most of the engine deck apart from the access doors on the flat section. The boxes are made up from styrene parts, but with PE brackets, latches and padlocks where appropriate. Despite this not being an interior kit, the turret is quite well appointed, with a full breech assembly, twin coaxial machine guns, turret baskets, seats and other equipment supplied in the box. The side doors can be posed open or closed, and have PE trim on the inside, with more PE parts forming the little hatches for the sighting gear and coax machine gun openings in the mantlet. The turret sits in the opening of the hull and is not locked in place, so you will either need to remember this, or fix it in place to avoid dropping it with handling. Markings There are four decal options in the box, with some optional personalisations made to the kit depending on which you choose, as pointed out throughout the build instructions. The decal sheet is small due to the genre, but from the box you can depict one of the following: Panzer-Zug 2.Panzer-Kompanie Pz.Abt. (ZbV)40 attached to the SS Division "Nord" XXXVI Army Corps, Karelia, Summer of 1941. IV Panzer-Zug 3.Panzer-Kompanie Pz.Abt.(ZbV)40 attached to the fast detachment Fossi (Osasto Fossi) battle group F (Ryhmä F) 3rd Infantry Division of the Finnish Army. The fighting in the direction of Uhtua – Vuokkiniemi Karelia, July 1941. I Panzer-Zug 2.Panzer-Kompanie Pz.Abt.(ZbV)40 attached to the division of the Finnish Army Corps (III Armeijakunta, III AK) Karelia, November 1941. Panzer-Zug 2.Panzer-Kompanie Pz.Abt. (ZbV)40 attached to the SS Division "Nord". Defensive battles in Kestenga village area (Kiestinki) April 24-May 11, 1942. Decals are printed in the Ukraine by Decograph with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion Another high quality model of this perhaps overlooked early War staple of the German tank forces. Of course due to their period of operation the dominant colour is panzer grey, but a distemper scheme has been included for a little variety, and the crew personalisations of the appliqué armour and extra stowage areas brings additional interest to the model. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Last week
  15. Nice - I have a couple on their way to me. I can barely wait. I love the P-63 (and I'm a sucker for that many decal options). The built up shots that Dora have posted on FB look lovely too so these should build up nicely. Did I mention I was excited?
  16. I had a squint at this before I sent it over to Julien and it's really crispy moulding
  17. Bell P-63A/C Kingcobra (14401) 1:144 Dora Wings The P-39 was developed to meet a proposal in 1937 for a single engine high altitude interceptor having the tactical mission of interception and attack of hostile aircraft at high altitude. Specifications called for a level airspeed of 360mph at altitude, and a climb to 20,000 feet in under 6 minutes. Armament was to be heavy including a cannon, the engine was to be liquid cooled, and the aircraft was to feature a tricycle undercarriage. Bell had previously designed the YFM-1 Aracuda featuring a mid-fuselage mounted engine to free up space for a large calibre 37mm cannon which would fire through the propeller hub. This was unusual as fighters were normally designed around an engine, not a weapons system. The Bell XP-39 would make its maiden flight in April of 1938 reaching 20000 feet in 5 minutes and maintain 390 mph. However it was found that top speed at 20000 feet was lower than the original proposed 400 mph. Bell would change the aircraft configuration for production to remove the turbo charger so production aircraft were only fitted with a single-stage, single-speed supercharger. Its been argued that Bell did this to save money, though its been said that testing showed aerodynamic issues with it. As a result production aircraft performance declined above 12000 feet and it was never able to serve as a medium level let alone high level aircraft. The RAF ordered the aircraft based on the XP-39 specifications however limitations of the "new" aircraft became apparent, and despite modifications it never was deemed acceptable. Only one Squadron No. 601 would use the aircraft operationally. All UK based aircraft would be sent to Russia, along with aircraft being built under contract in the US. In contrast to the UK, the USSR appreciated the P-39, although they would use it primarily in the ground attack role. The tactical environment of the Eastern front suited a low speed, low altitude aircraft much better. As well as in ground attack the USSR developed successful group aerial fighting tactics for the aircraft. 5 out of the 10 high scoring Soviet aces scored a majority of kills flying P-39's. Contrary to popular myth the Soviets did not use the aircraft for Tank Busting as the US did not supply any armour piercing rounds for the aircraft. A total of 4758 aircraft we sent to Russia. The US requisitioned 200 aircraft from an order based for the UK, they called these aircraft the P-400 as they were advertised with a top speed to 400mph. Following the attack on Pearl Harbour these aircraft were deployed to the South West Pacific. Despite being out classed by Japanese aircraft the aircraft excelled in the ground attack. Pilots would fight Zeros and the aircraft were fairly even in the low level environment. By the end of 1942 over 80 Japanese aircraft were credited. These aircraft would go onto fly from Aleutian Islands, and serve in the Panama Canal Zone. The 81st & 350th Fighter Groups would fly in the Mediterranean TO but mainly on maritime patrol missions. Later the 81st would transfer to the Burma TO. The K & N models would feature an Aeroproducts propeller. The Kit Dora Wings is a new company to us, and have kindly agreed to send samples for review. Kits in 1.144 are new to Dora Wings, this being their first, and they have kindly provided us with a sample in advance of them being on sale. Being 1.144 you get two kits n the pack. The kits do not have a mass of parts, but they are detailed for the scale. Construction starts with the cockpit, the front ad rear bulkheads are installed with the seat moulded in. The nose gear is installed on the underside of this part. The fuselage can then be closed up. The wings can then be made up and attached to the fuselage, this is followed by the tailplanes. The canopy can be put on along then with the front gear doors. On the underside of the aircraft the main gear can be fitted along with the tanks and gun pods if needed. Last up the prop & spinner are added. Markings Decals are printed in house and appear to have no issues. An impressive 9 decal options have been provided. P-63C Soviet lease lend aircraft, USSR 1944. P-63C Soviet lease lend aircraft, USSR 1945 "Bell Booby TRAP" painted by unknown American Mechanic. P-63C SC44126 Glendale, 1946. P-63C French Air Force, "Normandie-Nieman" French Indochina 1950. P-63C French Air Force, "Lle France" French Indochina 1950. RP-63A Pinball 1947 (All over yellow). P-63A "55" Winner Sohio Handicap Trophy Race 1948. P-63C "Tucker SPECIAL" Thompson Trophy Race 1946. P-63C "4""Join The Navy Reserve" Sohio Handicap Trophy Race 1948. Conclusion It is good to see a new company producing new aircraft in this scale as fans of 1:144 appear to have less choice than other scales. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Bell P-63E Kingcobra (72005) 1:72 Dora Wings The P-39 Airacobra was deemed to be a damp squib by the US, although the Russian pilots thought well of it, as it suited their needs, but Bell tried to improve the aircraft by basing their attempts on the more suitable P-39E with a redesigned wing, engine and the inclusion of a supercharger that was omitted from the original Airacobra in order to save money, which inevitably affected high altitude performance. The resulting airframe was so much different and noticeably larger, so was renamed and given the designation P-63A by the military, who ordered it into production toward the end of 1942, which was the main in-service variant. In an attempt to improve performance it progressed to the D variant, which was the basis for the P-63E, but with a return to the cab-door canopy, and a ventral fin extension to improve stability. Only 13 Es were built, and the project stuttered to a halt from there. The Kit Dora Wings is a new company to us, and have kindly agreed to send samples for review. Mike reviewed the 1:48 version of this kit here, however as he is not a proponent of the "one true scale" he has left it to me to introduce this one. The kit arrives on six small sprues of plastic, a clear sprue; and provides a PE sheet and a set of masks. Very much the complete package, Construction starts in the cockpit area the seat and bulkheads being made up and attached to the floor, the rear radio area is also made up. The front bulkhead with the instrument panel is made up and attached. The instructions have you add the front landing gear at this stage, though you may well be advised to see if you can leave it off for addition later. The indies for the front gear well are also then added to the other side of the cockpit floor. Construction then moves to the wings with the main gear wells and radiators being installed, the drop tanks are also built up at this time. The wings can then be closed up, Flaps and the air intake are also built up at this time. The fuselage is then closed up around the cockpit and the side exhausts added. The top air intake can then be added. On the wings the flaps are added, and at the tail end the tail planes and rudder are added. To finish The main gears, canopy and propeller are added along with the drop tanks and underwing guns. Last part on is the cockpit door and top aerial. Markings Decals are provided for 6 aircraft. 311721 USAF 311720 USAF 311727USAF N9003R Civil registration 401 Honduran Air Force 402 Honduran Air Force The decals are printed by in house and would appear to have no issues , its worth noting that the USAF never used the aircraft and the USAF markings are probably for delivery flights to the Honduran Air Force. Conclusion The P-63 came along at a time when the attention was focused more on the nascent jet age, so it gathered little attention, and many folks probably couldn't even tell the difference between it and the P-39 unless they were side-by-side. That said, it's an appealing aircraft, and as a model it looks like it will go together pretty well. It's a shame there weren't more variations on colour schemes, but as there were only a few airframes built in this configuration, it's hardly surprising. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. Hiller YH-32 Hornet (48005) 1/48 AMP via Mikromir Hiller Aircraft was one of the early pioneers of rotary winged or Helicopter aviation in the US. The company was formed in 1942 to develop the Hiller XH-44 for the US Army. The company would be renamed Hiller Helicopters in 1948. The YH-32 was an attempt to produce an ultra light helicopter and as such was to do away with a conventional engine. Hiller's solution was to mount two ramjet engines on the tip of the rotor blades. Another benefit from this design was that there was no need for a tail rotor and its associated equipment thus saving weight. However in practice the design had a few flaws. The rotor have to be subsonic and ramjets do not work well at these speeds. This resulted in poor performance, high fuel usage, and a poor range. The ram jets were also very noisy, and importantly for military operations were very visible at night. Versions were produced for the US Army and Navy but did not progress past the prototype stage. It is good to see companies bringing us kits outside of the main stream and the YH-32 certainly qualifies for this. Despite being 1.48 the kit is diminutive as was the real thing. The kit arrives on two sprues of plastic, a clear spure, with a sheet of PE and a set of masks. Construction starts f with the cabin. The main base is made up from mainly plastic parts, There are a couple of PE parts including the pedals and the seat frame. The seats follow with PE belts. The base is then added to the skids after they are made up. The rear body and tail assembly is then made up and fitted to the base. The large clear bubble is added along with a wire part which the modeller has to make, there as a template for this on the instructions. Finally the rotor assembly with the tip mounted ramjets is made up ad added on top. Decals A small decal sheet provides marking for 2 US Army & ! US Navy machines. Conclusion This is something which we never thought would be produced in kit form, it is one of those oddities from early Helicopter innovations that never took off (if you can excuse the pun), the kit is welcome addition to early Helicopters from AMP. Highly Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. US Machine gun set (37047) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Continuing their current theme of providing the modeller with a full range of ancillary items to bedeck and festoon dioramas, vehicles and vignettes, this set takes the theme of machine guns seen on US Army vehicles since WWII. Namely the Browning M2 0.5" Heavy machine gun and the smaller Browning M1919 0.3" Medium machine gun. 4 of each type of gun is included along with various mounts, ammo belts and feed boxes. The quality of the mouldings is superb throughout and PE is included even for the perforated sleeves if you wish to replace it. This will be a perfect set for anything needing to have a Machine gun mounted, or for diorama purposes. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. SE.5a Night Fighter 82133 Eduard (ProfiPACK) - 1:48 Eduard have already produced four previous boxings of their SE.5a kit in Hisso, Viper, and Royal Class forms. Now we have the 'Night Fighter' version, which is the most unusual of all the releases. It contains all the optional parts to build either a Hispano-Suiza or Wolsely Viper powered machine, with wooden or metal undercarriage legs, and a choice of three different propellers. The easy way to tell if an SE.5a was Viper powered is that the propeller is exactly midway between the top and bottom of the front radiator, whilst on the Hispano the prop is mounted more like two thirds of the way up. A second clue is that they rotated in opposite directions, so the Viper prop rotated anti-clockwise and the Hisso clockwise when viewed from the front. Adapted for use a night fighter late in the war to tackle raids being mounted by German bombers, the basic SE.5a does not appear to have been altered very much. Noticeable differences are the addition of various exhaust flame damping devices, and the mounting of Holt flares under the fuselage (an early form of landing light). Very likely some form of illumination was provided for the instruments as well. The Kit. Presented in Eduard's familiar Orange banded 'Profipack' box, the artwork features what looks to be a Zeppelin-Staaken machine being shot down by B658. Inside are two large sprues, one clear sprue, two etched brass frets, two sheets of decals, a pack of resin details, a small sheet of kabuki tape masks, and the instruction booklet. Sprue A. Crisply moulded in Eduards standard dark grey plastic, this sprue holds the wings, struts, tail, and undercarriage. The rib detail is nicely done with very fine stitching just visible on the rib tapes. I particularly like the way that the leading edge riblets are done, they really do look as if they are wooden frames covered by taut fabric, with a subtle amount of sag between. It is nice to see that the triangular openings for the wing pulley inspection covers are represented, with miniature pulleys inside. These were present on several British aircraft of this period, but this is the first time I can recall seeing them done in this scale. The struts have really lovely detail on their end brackets and are commendably thin. Both the 'wooden' and 'metal' undercarriage legs are supplied, with options A,B, and C requiring the 'metal' ones, and option D using the 'wooden' set. Sprue B. Equally finely moulded are all the fuselage parts, the engine, and numerous little details. The stitching work on the fuselage is possibly the best I have ever seen in this scale, it is really lovely. There are some very small detail parts such as trim wheels, footsteps, brackets, pipes etc that will need to be carefully cut from the sprue, because if the carpet monster gets them you'll be unlikely to ever see them again. Both the Hispano-Suiza and Viper engines are provided as separate crankcase + cylinder units, although both share the same ancillary parts. A four blade and a pair of two bladed propellers are supplied, and if using a two blader be careful to select the correct one as one is for clockwise rotation while the other is anti clockwise depending upon which engine you choose. Although I have not had a chance to build one of Eduard's SE.5a's yet, based on previous experience I have no doubt that it will all fit together beautifully. Sprue C. This is one of Eduard's circular clear sprues, with optional windscreens and covers for the pulley inspection covers in the wings. Etched frets. Two frets are supplied, the larger of the two is the 'standard' set provided in the other SE.5a kits (except the 'weekend' edition). Two styles of pre painted seat belts are provided, the more common wide lap type and the later four point type. Among the forty four parts are various cockpit details, including pre painted instruments, ammo drum boxes, and details for the guns. Also useful are the aileron and elevator control horns, complete with the cables. These save a very fiddly job! The second brass fret is much smaller, and provides night fighter specific items to form various brackets and mountings for the exhaust pipes and flame dampers, as well as the under fuselage flares. A nice little bomb rack is also on the fret, but obviously not required for the night fighter, nevertheless it will be very welcome in the spares box for other projects. Resin. Three sets of different exhaust flame dampers are supplied in resin, only one of which will be used according to which option you select. The detail is very fine, and the exhaust pipes have recessed openings at their ends. Masks. A small set of pre-cut kabuki tape masks contains items for the windscreens, inspection panels, and tyres. Decals. Two sheets are provided, the larger of them consisting of the diamond pattern for Option A, Cecil Lewis's machine. The slightly small sheet covers the other three options, including the multiple red striped option C. All the individual decals look to be very thin with minimal carrier film. The colours are good and in perfect register with sharp edges. As noted in the instructions, the main colour is not the usual dark green/brown PC10, but the green/black 'Night Invisible Varnish Orfordness' (NIVO). This is probably one of the first uses of what became a familiar colouring between the wars, and further adds to the interest. Marking Options. A. B658, flown by Capt. Cecil Lewis, No. 61 (Home Defence) Squadron, Rochford, United Kingdom, January 1918. B. C1805, flown by Lt. W. R. Oulton, No. 143 (Home Defence) Squadron, Detling, United Kingdom, May 1918. C. Flown by Capt. Gilbert Insall VC, No. 50 (Home Defence) Squadron, Bekesbourne, United Kingdom, May/ July 1918. D. D5995, flown by Lt. L. Lucas, No. 50 (Home Defence) Squadron, Bekesbourne, United Kingdom, summer 1918 Conclusion. This is a very well presented package by Eduard, and is without a doubt the best 1:48 scale SE.5a available. The addition of the resin and etched brass to make a night fighter is a clever move by Eduard, and as far as I know this is the first time that such an option has appeared for the SE.5a in any scale. The choice of marking options makes it almost impossible to choose just one, I will have to obtain another kit as I need do at least two of them. (Option A, Cecil Lewis was a truly extraordinary gentleman, who only died in 1997. Obituary here. and remarkable BBC interview here) Highly Recommended, a really superb offering from Eduard. Review sample courtesy of
  22. The Metal protective cover, for the Trophy weapon dispenser is a Later addition. The earl covers were just canvas, and they all will have the Metal protective cove now. Net Photo (BM) Net Photo
  23. magman2

    British 7.2inch Howitzer (35211) 1:35

    A photo, of the kits second paint option. 7.2-inch howitzer of 51st Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery, France, 2 September 1944 Net Photo (IWM)
  24. MiG-29UB Update sets, Seatbelts & Masks 1:32 Eduard for Trumpeter Kit The new tool MiG-29UB is welcome for those who build modern Soviet trianers, Eduard are now along with some sets for it. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior Set (32928) This set has two pre-painted frets, and one brass one. You get cockpit details, (for both stations), instrument panels, and the other panels. Parts for the seats, bulkheads, side panels, seat rails, rudder pedals, and many other smaller cockpit parts. A new HUD, canopy mirrors, and other canopy parts. Zoom! Set (33196) This set contains a reduced subset of the update set, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above, with the seat belts. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Exterior Set (32424) This set contains as the name would suggest parts for the aircraft exterior. There are new intake ramps which can be modelled in the open or closed positions. Various antennas and grills, new engine fan parts, & static wicks Undercarriage Set (32425) This set contains as the name would suggest parts for the aircraft undercarriage and their bays. There are new linkages for the legs, new interiors for the doors with various panels for the bays. Also included are Brake lines for the wheels. Seatbelts (33196) This set contains one pre-painted fret. There are seatbelts, seat pads and ejection seat handles in the now familiar steel material. Masks (JX217) Supplied on yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the exterior glazing. Tface Masks (JX218) Supplied on yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the interior & exterior glazing. Review samples courtesy of
  25. P-61B Update sets & Masks 1:72 Eduard for Hobby Boss Kit The new tool P-61B is welcome for those who build WWII American Aircraft, Eduard are now along with some sets for it. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior Set (73638) This set has one pre-painted fret, and one brass one. You get cockpit details, seat belts (for both stations), instrument panels, and the other panels. There are parts for the turrets and many internal features. New sides are provided for the inside of the gunners station. A new entry hatch is provided, as many internal parts. Zoom! Set (SS638) This set contains a reduced subset of the update set, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above, with the seat belts. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Exterior Set (72674) This set contains as the name would suggest parts for the aircraft exterior. There are new interior parts for the main gear wells, mud guards for the wheels, engine vent panels. engine wiring harnesses, main gear brake lines & links, a new fuselage aerial, wing radiator inlets, and flap guides Masks (CX519) Supplied on yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the glazing. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review samples courtesy of
  26. Wellington Mk.1A/C Update sets, Wheels & Masks 1:72 Eduard for Airfix Kit The new tool Wellington is welcome for those who build WWII British Aircraft, Eduard are now along with some sets for it. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Update Set (73639) This set has one pre-painted fret, and one brass one. You get cockpit details, seat belts, instrument panels, and the other panels. There are parts for the turrets and many internal features. Frames are provided for the bomb aimers clear panel. New brake lines are provided for the main gear, along with internal panels for the bays. Balance horns are provided for the rudder and a new door for the tail wheel. Zoom! Set (SS639) This set contains a reduced subset of the update set, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above, with the seat belts. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Flaps Set (72672) This set contains as the name would suggest a complete set of landing flaps for the aircraft. Some kit surgery will be needed to fit these. Wheels (72672) This Brassin set gives both main wheels and the tail wheel. A sheet of masks for the mains is also included (not shown) Masks (CX518) Supplied on yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the glazing. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the main wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review samples courtesy of
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