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AS 186 Compressor question


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#1 PsiFox

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 11:01 PM

Might be me being a bit thick, but I can't see how to alter the output pressure on this compressor.

I know it's done somewhere on the regulator but can't see how.

Any advice welcome thanks

edited title to type correct no. numpty mode off:)

Edited by PsiFox, 14 February 2011 - 11:39 PM.


#2 Paul-H

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 11:15 PM

Hi

Did you mean AS186, as I cannot find any reference to a AS168

Has it got a combined water trap with pressure gauge. If it has then its normally a case of lift the knob on top and then turn it left or right to change the pressure. then when set push the know down to lock it off.

Hope this has helped.

Paul

#3 PsiFox

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 11:35 PM

Hi

Did you mean AS186, as I cannot find any reference to a AS168

Has it got a combined water trap with pressure gauge. If it has then its normally a case of lift the knob on top and then turn it left or right to change the pressure. then when set push the know down to lock it off.

Hope this has helped.

Paul



sorry yes the 186. Right got you on the change it on the pressure gauge. I'm assuming that doesn't alter the auto on/off for low/hi pressure settings?

#4 alanmac

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 01:45 PM

GLAD I'M NOT THE ONLY ONE.....

I took my one back to the supplier because I couldn't figure out how to change the pressure and it wasn't my first compressor either. I was turning the whole attachment and complaining about it leaking and coming off. Felt a bit stupid when he grab the knob pulled it up and adjusted the pressure and pushed it down again d'oh.

I did say at the time it might be a good idea to add something to the little booklet/instructions to show how this works as its not really obvious as you as well as myself can attest to.


Alan

Edited by alanmac, 15 February 2011 - 01:45 PM.


#5 PsiFox

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 01:48 PM

GLAD I'M NOT THE ONLY ONE.....

I took my one back to the supplier because I couldn't figure out how to change the pressure and it wasn't my first compressor either. I was turning the whole attachment and complaining about it leaking and coming off. Felt a bit stupid when he grab the knob pulled it up and adjusted the pressure and pushed it down again d'oh.

I did say at the time it might be a good idea to add something to the little booklet/instructions to show how this works as its not really obvious as you as well as myself can attest to.


Alan



so does that adjustment have any bearing on the auto on/off settings?

#6 alanmac

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 02:14 PM

so does that adjustment have any bearing on the auto on/off settings?



Hi

The pressure regulator controls the air pressure from the tank to the airbrush nothing more.

If you look on the top of the compressor piston head (for want of a better description) mine has a connection coming back off of it to the motor. The other side of it has the connection going to the air tank. I guess through the back pressure from the tank back up that tube into the piston chamber, it is in turn picked up by the other connection (pressure switch) leading down to the motor and would mean that the compressor runs until a set pressure, safe for the tank is reached and then switches off. After all it will come on and off regardless of the amount of actual airbrush use.

If this switch was to fail, the motor would keep running, building pressure up in the tank. That's why you have the little red plug shaped object directly on the tank, a safety switch which will blow if the pressure becomes too great.

Alan

P.S. I just checked the web site where I brought mine (everything airbrush) and it states psi is safe working pressure of 57 psi so I guess that's what the pressure switch is set to, once that's reached it switches off, with a corresponding low setting to switch it back on.

Edited by alanmac, 15 February 2011 - 02:20 PM.


#7 PsiFox

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 03:06 PM

Hi

The pressure regulator controls the air pressure from the tank to the airbrush nothing more.

If you look on the top of the compressor piston head (for want of a better description) mine has a connection coming back off of it to the motor. The other side of it has the connection going to the air tank. I guess through the back pressure from the tank back up that tube into the piston chamber, it is in turn picked up by the other connection (pressure switch) leading down to the motor and would mean that the compressor runs until a set pressure, safe for the tank is reached and then switches off. After all it will come on and off regardless of the amount of actual airbrush use.

If this switch was to fail, the motor would keep running, building pressure up in the tank. That's why you have the little red plug shaped object directly on the tank, a safety switch which will blow if the pressure becomes too great.

Alan

P.S. I just checked the web site where I brought mine (everything airbrush) and it states psi is safe working pressure of 57 psi so I guess that's what the pressure switch is set to, once that's reached it switches off, with a corresponding low setting to switch it back on.



Ah with you now :).

One last question I think. Do I have to adjust the output pressure setting whilst air is blowing through a brush. I assume so otherwise no air is being used.

#8 alanmac

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 05:56 PM

Ah with you now :).

One last question I think. Do I have to adjust the output pressure setting whilst air is blowing through a brush. I assume so otherwise no air is being used.



Hi

No, you shouldn't have to, just turn the dial and watch the needle go up or down. Its reading the pressure of air against it.

As with all the things you need to do some trial and error. You can't just say I'll spray all my paint at such and such a pressure, it takes fine tuning to get to know what works best for the paint used, it's level of thinning, the brush you have, and what you do whilst spraying, distance, hand movement etc. As is often written, find an old model and use it as a test piece, don't go trying it on your latest and greatest till you had a bit of practise.

#9 PsiFox

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 08:57 PM

Hi

No, you shouldn't have to, just turn the dial and watch the needle go up or down. Its reading the pressure of air against it.

As with all the things you need to do some trial and error. You can't just say I'll spray all my paint at such and such a pressure, it takes fine tuning to get to know what works best for the paint used, it's level of thinning, the brush you have, and what you do whilst spraying, distance, hand movement etc. As is often written, find an old model and use it as a test piece, don't go trying it on your latest and greatest till you had a bit of practise.


Thanks for that.

Oh god no. My father was a Marine Engineer. I have old school in my blood. Check often, trial often, complete.

Even the dog might get a few trial coats (for dog lovers pleae note this is humour, I'll use the cat!!!!)