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Slater

No more RAF two-seat Typhoons?

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Probably Phase 1 airframes that won't cope with upgrading.  That's a long way from the full 2-seater fleet, and the training requirement will have tailed off as the fleet reaches its full operating size.

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£50million worth of parts from each airframe!! How much did they cost when new?

 

Duncan B

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On ‎05‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 3:14 PM, Graham Boak said:

Probably Phase 1 airframes that won't cope with upgrading.  That's a long way from the full 2-seater fleet, and the training requirement will have tailed off as the fleet reaches its full operating size.

I think you'll find it's referred to as Tranche 1 airframes. Also the training requirement will be the same, and not tail off, introduction of the Typhoon has been spread over a long number of years so there will be pilots who were on the first Typhoon squadrons who will have retired from service and their successors need to be trained. It's a forever evolving situation.

 

What HAS changed, of course, is the way training is delivered and with far more capable full  mission and procedural simulators that are far cheaper than actual air time, which is where the need for twin-sweaters has tailed off.

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Tranche 1, yes.  However what I said did not imply any disappearance of training - the subject was only 12 aircraft out of the entire fleet.  However protracted the build up, the need for pilots to fill the squadrons when new will inevitably be greater than the need for replacements - which can and will be partly filled by recycling individuals from earlier tours.  Yes, they will need refreshing, but this would involve fewer hours - and, relevantly, up-to-date systems.  Yes, simulators are better now, and this probably is another factor, but if they were quite so significantly superior we would see a much larger reduction in the trainer fleer.  Perhaps that is yet to come, of course.

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It's an interesting thought Graham, I know in my area of aviation, crews can train and qualify on a type as F/O without touching the real aircraft (there will be some line flying with a training Captain present).

 

I think the benefits of simulators is that they can give excellent procedures training and can create multiple scenarios you will never see in most real world flying. The art is, I guess, getting the blend correct and I've seen figures for the likes of F35 of 50:50 or 60:40 in favour of simulator work. I'd imagine the more modern types/avionic fits would lend themselves most to a blended plan.

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