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MeneMene

"Bar rigging" (is that the right term) 1930's biplanes

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What's the best way to recreate interwar rigging, like the type you see on the Swordfish, where the rigging isn't cables so much as it is metal bars under tension? Tamiya provides a photoetch set for this for it's swordfish, but that's not available for every kit. I'm working on an Avia B.534, and it too has this thick "bar" rigging as opposed to just cables.

 

See this image for reference

 

img_3170.jpg[/img]

 

 

Thanks

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WNW suggests Prym for their kits with RAF flat rigging .

What you are looking for is the same thing. 

The p/e flat rigging available is troublesome , unworkable and I have not seen anyone have it work out.

I tried for 3 weeks to rig 2 bays and this is what I saw every morning after letting it set over night:

IMG_4529.jpg

IMG_4526.jpg

Myself and others in my IPMS crew spent hundreds of dollars on this unproven stuff, I failed to make it work despite weeks of effort and frustration , most of it in front of the boys at meetings. Blobs of crusted cyano from repeated regluings and the realization that IT DOES NOT WORK , resulted in the model being stripped of the junk and rigged in 2 days with Prym.

I have used the p/e for short runs on the tail and such , and I have seen it used on monoplanes like the Peashooter , but it has to have a very strong bay to work out. I think the differences in the contraction and expansion of the different materials means it will never work.

Use the Prym , be happy.

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11 minutes ago, krow113 said:

WNW suggests Prym for their kits with RAF flat rigging .

What you are looking for is the same thing. 

The p/e flat rigging available is troublesome , unworkable and I have not seen anyone have it work out.

 

Would the prym wire be appropriate for 1/48 scale? Most of the references for it that I've seen are 1/32 builds

 

I got the tamiya photoetch stuff to work on the Swordfish, but I agree that approach is generally ineffective.

Edited by MeneMene

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9 minutes ago, MeneMene said:

 

Would the prym wire be appropriate for 1/48 scale? Most of the references for it that I've seen are 1/32 builds

 

I got the tamiya photoetch stuff to work on the Swordfish, but I agree that approach is generally ineffective.

Not sure if its good for 1/48 , I think it would be too large and look ungainly. It looks ok in 1/32:

IMG_4830.jpg

Pretty sure most of the 1/48ers just use elastic line of some sort , not worrying too much if it has the flat rigging profile.

 

This is also not the first thread of this type. Searching the forum will result in a lot more input.

Good luck!

Edited by krow113

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Just now, krow113 said:

Pretty sure most of the 1/48ers just use elastic line of some sort , not worrying too much if it has the flat rigging profile.

Ok thanks. On that note, I think the Avia rigging isn't quite the same as RAF flat rigging, it looks more like a rod. I still think regular elastic line would be too fine for it, but I can try

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5 hours ago, MeneMene said:

What's the best way to recreate interwar rigging, like the type you see on the Swordfish, where the rigging isn't cables so much as it is metal bars under tension? Tamiya provides a photoetch set for this for it's swordfish, but that's not available for every kit. I'm working on an Avia B.534, and it too has this thick "bar" rigging as opposed to just cables.

 

See this image for reference

 

img_3170.jpg[/img]

 

 

Thanks

You might try a dental supply store, dental lab, or a local dentist to obtain stainless wire- it is used by  orthodontists, and comes in varying diameters, from very fine flexible wire used to secure devices to bands on teeth, to larger rigid diameters used to make various appliances. I used it on my 1/72  Siskin for the wing rigging wires and it worked very well and was in scale. There used to be a firm called Small Parts that carried wire, tubing, and other materials suitable  for model builders, but  I don't know if they are still in business. I'm sure others will be able to help you more than I.

Mike

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But that is a preserved aircraft; how accurate is it? A very nicely preserved one, I might add, but it might even be a replica? The stainless steel wire sounds like a good idea - is it rigid enough to just pop into pre-drilled holes? That's the idea I have for rigging, as every other method I've tried or heard about just doesn't work well or easily for me.

 

Regards,

 

Jason

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My favourite method for rigging 1/48 interwar biplanes, comes from the rock'n roll scene....:D

I use Fender steel electric guitar string, 0.08....

FENDER250XS838_512x.jpeg?v=1482156508

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What about using EZ cable (which is flat in transection) and paint it to meke it a bit more solid?

J-W

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On 1/13/2018 at 1:00 PM, Artie said:

My favourite method for rigging 1/48 interwar biplanes, comes from the rock'n roll scene....:D

I use Fender steel electric guitar string, 0.08....


The Pre-CBS 008 top E strings were better (Sorry, thread drift guitarry joke)

 

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