Jump to content

If you're one of the gradually reducing number of folks that aren't currently receiving notifications to topics you've subscribed to, or PMs you're receiving, first check you've got the correct address in your profile, then drop in and post your experience in this thread, remembering to tell us your email provider's details, which is the part after the @ in your email address.

This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Whofan

" A badly made Airfix model"

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I think the photo caption in this is a little unfair to Arifix, but if you haven't seen this report of how a crashed P 40 was recovered from the Egyptian desert and restored, you might want to look now;

 

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/01/03/aviation-historians-express-anger-lost-world-war-two-fighter/

Edited by Whofan
spelling !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Presumably someone knows where the RAFM’s Spitfire went?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not convinced preserving it in its crashed condition would have been a better option.

 

At least now it's not going to be stolen or wrecked further by souvenir hunters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish my badly made airfix models looked that good !  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 3DStewart said:

I'm not convinced preserving it in its crashed condition would have been a better option.

 

At least now it's not going to be stolen or wrecked further by souvenir hunters.

I think you may have missed the point: the aeroplane represented a tiny moment in the Second World War and was totally unique.  Yes, the passage of time had faded and discoloured the paint that sandstorms hadn't eroded and the accident damage had ensured that it wouldn't fly again but it represented the pilot's determination to get home to continue the fight against an ideology whose stated ambition was world domination, including domination of Egypt whether they wanted it or not.  The German war machine would quite happily have subjugated the entire Middle East to satisfy its demands for fossil fuels lying beneath the desert and the Egyptian (and other nations) slave labour to extract them.

 

Thanks to the crack-handed (at best) attempt at a "restoration" the uniqueness of this aeroplane has been lost forever: now it's just another poorly-restored warbirds the likes of which could be found at the gates of many airfields in the immediate post-war era or in the hands of very amateur collectors.

 

The comments of Ajay Srivastava at the RAF Museum are almost unbelievable.  This aeroplane, and its last pilot, are a unique part of Royal Air Force history and, like Halifax W1048 for example, are emblematic of the dark days early on in the War.  That he is so dismissive of the way in which this entire situation has evolved beggars belief and I think that, were I his ultimate boss, I would be recommending to him that he seriously reconsider his position and future career prospects.  

 

RAFM doesn't come out of this smelling of roses either: the botched trade of Spitfire PK664, stripped-out hulk or not, was so poorly handled that those responsible might also need to be advised to start trawling the likes of Indeed and Monster.  That aeroplane had a commercial value, even as scrap, and is now lost, the whole fiasco looks like the mess that made it more expensive to cancel HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales than to continue building them, albeit on a smaller scale.

 

Happy 100th birthday RAF.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Whofan said:

I think the photo caption in this is a little unfair to Arifix, but if you haven't seen this report of how a crashed P 40 was recovered from the Egyptian desert and restored, you might want to look now;

 

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/01/03/aviation-historians-express-anger-lost-world-war-two-fighter/

Don't you mean, "You might want to look away now"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Seahawk said:

Don't you mean, "You might want to look away now"?

 

You know, i almost did say that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bottom line is that it is Egyptian property now so they didn't have to actually do anything with it at all and could have just left it to rot in the desert. We should be thankful that isn't the case and whatever happens to it in the future will be more satisfactory than if it had been left.

 

Duncan B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Further to what Duncan says, I think it is wrong to bollux the Egyptians who are probably proud of what they've achieved with this. Bear in mind the way they relate to it is likely utterly different to the way we do, as far as i see it, the blame lies with bungling officialdom & a large chunk of bad luck that the Arab spring got badly in the way of proceedings. At least the Egyptians who did the restoration had the passion & drive to do something, albeit in a different idiom to what we might have preferred, all the time whilst their country was in turmoil. All strength to the individuals concerned perhaps is more appropriate than condemnation.

Steve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem was that it was pretty unique and the original colours were almost pristine. If it had been recovered from the bottom of the Nile and had lost a lot of its original paint work I'd be congratulating the Egyptians.

 

The problem is that they've ruined what was a truly unique find.

 

They wouldn't do the same if they found another King Tut face mask. Do you think the head of the Museum of Cairo would say - "Hey lads, that mask needs a bit of a touch up. Pop down to the Egyptian equivalent of B&Q and get some gold and metallic blue paint and we'll sort it out".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Eric Mc said:

 

 

They wouldn't do the same if they found another King Tut face mask. Do you think the head of the Museum of Cairo would say - "Hey lads, that mask needs a bit of a touch up. Pop down to the Egyptian equivalent of B&Q and get some gold and metallic blue paint and we'll sort it out".

No? How about Super gluing King Tut's beard back onto his iconic mask when it fell off during cleaning. I understand what you are saying about the 'time capsule' element but that it got saved at all is truly the remarkable thing.

 

Duncan B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's done, and what's done can't properly be undone, sadly. At least it's safe from the looters for now, but I'd be very interested to see them get to the bottom of the missing Spitfire fiasco. Someone needs to get what's coming to them over that. <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

    It would suprise me if they had stripped the old paint off, probably just painted over the top of it.

    

   in reality, pretty similar painting was done in the uk years ago, to historic and gate gaurdian aircraft

 

 

    cheers

      jerry

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The tragedy is that the aircraft in its current presentation, has lost all its historical context. You could replace the aircraft as it is displayed, with a fibreglass replica, and nobody would be the wiser. Why the RAFM did not offer a fibreglass replica to get the original aircraft back, I don't know. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×