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malpaso

someone give Airfix Workbench a dictionary

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Is Enigmatic the only descriptive word the author of Airfix Workbench knows?  Every issue uses the word and almost never correctly!

 

Apparently this week the Walrus isn't as enigmatic as the Spitfire. 

"Although perhaps not as enigmatic as the Spitfire, modellers have welcomed the new Walrus as one of the most impressive kits in the Airfix range."

What?  Presumably the author may have meant emblematic?  Or (s)he just has no idea of the meaning.

 

The only thing "enigmatic" is how Airfix actually choose which planes to model.  Perhaps they consult the Oracle at Delphi, who was legendarily vague in her answers.

 

Cheers

Will

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I wondered about that word choice as well. And Airfix, if you're listening, I am an experienced social media manager; it's what I do. Nobody will work harder for you than me (because I would need to be employed to live in the UK). I have very low self-esteem, which is why I work in the not-for-profit field, which in its own way is not unlike how things must be working for Hornby. Hire me. 

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36 minutes ago, styreno said:

Methinks the writer means 'iconic'.

KE

But writing iconic would have been much less enigmatic.

:D

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I had one of those enigmatic things from the Doctor once.

 

Maybe the enigma is how RJ could design both the beautiful Spitfire & the pig ugly Walrus....just sayin :) 

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3 hours ago, malpaso said:

Perhaps they consult the Oracle at Delphi, who was legendarily vague in her answers.

That must be the reason for all this misguided 1/48 nonsense.  She needs nobbling, quick.

 

PS "infamous" is another victim of semantic drift/journalistic illiteracy.  Apparently nowadays it means the same as "famous".

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Me! Failing English? That's unpossible! :frantic:

 

I just wish they wouldn't use the exact same format for both the Hornby and Airfix emails that usually arrive within a few minutes of each other casa me. :rolleyes:

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Oh boy. I work in what's known as User Assistance for a major software company, which means I translate, edit and test documentation and what appears onscreen for users. This often results in terminological angels dancing on metaphorical pins like defining the difference between a supplier and a vendor. Then I maintain the terminology database so everyone else gets to use the same term (the correct term!) for the same business area. Woe betide them if they don't.

Perhaps there is an Airfix-specific definition of enigmatic; it's just that we don't know it...

Edited by Steve Coombs

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54 minutes ago, Seahawk said:

That must be the reason for all this misguided 1/48 nonsense.  She needs nobbling, quick.

 

PS "infamous" is another victim of semantic drift/journalistic illiteracy.  Apparently nowadays it means the same as "famous".

I think it used to be a synonym for immoral.  Enormity has suffered a similar fate. Now it means very large size as opposed to a crime.

Edited by JosephLalor

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Maybe Airfix just are employing the guy that used to write Del's lines in Only Fools and Horses?

 

Quelle fromage Rodney

 

 

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9 hours ago, styreno said:

Methinks the writer means 'iconic'.

KE

Meh. Or emblematic. Illiteracy is rife.

 

Shane

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9 hours ago, sinnerboy said:

I had one of those enigmatic things from the Doctor once.

 

Maybe the enigma is how RJ could design both the beautiful Spitfire & the pig ugly Walrus....just sayin :) 

 

Form follows function. A Spitfire trying to land on the water and pick up downed aircrew would  look pretty ugly too. Just saying.

 

Shane

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If people could bother themselves enough to use a theseus or a smellchecker, the English languish would not have to suffer such indigent tease.

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On 27/10/2017 at 4:51 PM, Procopius said:

I wondered about that word choice as well. And Airfix, if you're listening, I am an experienced social media manager; it's what I do. Nobody will work harder for you than me (because I would need to be employed to live in the UK). I have very low self-esteem, which is why I work in the not-for-profit field, which in its own way is not unlike how things must be working for Hornby. Hire me. 

Dress that up a bit and send it in. Nothing ventured nothing gained. You'll get the bonus point from being an American (in their eyes) so an advantage to breaking into that market.

When you've got the job the price is mentioning 1/48 Bristol 188 as often as possible.

 

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On 28/10/2017 at 1:46 AM, Rob G said:

'Ubiquitous'. That's another one that's often incorrectly used.

Yup. You see that one everywhere ;)

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Yes, Airfix made a mal paso there!

The historical progress of etymology means that, if they (and many. many others) keep misusing the word, (it's) grr its meaning will change.

Edited by Ed Russell
pernicketiness

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25 minutes ago, Ed Russell said:

keep misusing the word, it's meaning will change.

Oh the irony :oops:

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10 minutes ago, Ed Russell said:

Haha - spulchucker does it again! Good spot!

It's the bane of my life when spearchucker does that. 

The other one that makes me hang my head in shame is when it turns my intended "your" into "you're" (or vice-versa) and I fail to notice.

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On 27/10/2017 at 5:45 PM, sinnerboy said:

I had one of those enigmatic things from the Doctor once.

 

Maybe the enigma is how RJ could design both the beautiful Spitfire & the pig ugly Walrus....just sayin :) 

Knew a chap many years ago who was ex Fleet Air Arm, and  who had been pulled out of the sea by  Walrus on no less than three occasions during the war. He would tell you catagorically  that the dear old shagbat was one of the most beautiful things he has ever seen! 

 

Selwyn

 

(Beauty is in the eye of the beholder!)

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On 28/10/2017 at 1:46 AM, Rob G said:

'Ubiquitous'. That's another one that's often incorrectly used.

Yes everyone is using it

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On ‎27‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 16:48, bhouse said:

I think a thesaurus may be more useful than a dictionary!

Weren't they all wiped out by an asteroid 65 million years ago?

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