Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
Eric Mc

Sputnik 1 - 60th Anniversary 4 October 2017

Recommended Posts

Although I posted some pictures in the Real Space Discussion area, I should really have posted pictures of the finished item here. Following a suggestion by another Brirtmodeller, I purchased some AFV aerial wire from Accurate Armour and it certainly looks a lot better than the original stretched sprue aerials.

 

The body of the satellite is a humble ping pong ball dressed up with some plastic card and Avery label material.

 

FE0i3kvP.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A simple - yet powerfull display! Well done! :goodjob:

 

I wonder - it's not still up there - is it? :hmmm:

 

Cheers :bye:

Hans J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, Sputnik 1 fell back to earth 21 days after it entered orbit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice.

 

We often get mesmerized by Sci FI/Fantasy projects because of imagination used in designing and building them but building real-world spacecraft takes as much ingenuity and skill to make a realistic replica. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say I am far more interested in genuine space hardware rather than what some imaginative folk have dreamed up for a Hollywood space opera (with the odd exception). Sputnik 1 was about as basic as a satellite could possibly be without being a completely inert piece of metal. It carried no specific scientific experimental equipment of any sort, apart from a basic radio transmitter from which some scientific analysis could be made using the radio signal coming from the transmitter. It's main job was to achieve  a successful and stable orbit and to announce that fact to the world - using the radio.

 

Sputnik 1 was actually  a back up satellite for a more sophisticated design that had been slated for the first launch. However, because this was a much more complicated device, it was decided to build a much simpler alternative as a back up and, in the end, it was decided to launch this one first. The more complicated satellite was eventually launched successfully in 1958 and designated Sputnik 3. It contained a number of radiation and magnetic field detectors to help understand the near space environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's fantastic, and I agree with Hans above, a very effective display.

 

On 10/2/2017 at 2:22 AM, Eric Mc said:

I have to say I am far more interested in genuine space hardware rather than what some imaginative folk have dreamed up for a Hollywood space opera (with the odd exception).

 

I wonder if "real space" should have a section separate to sci-fi – I'm sure some people that aren't so interested in sci-fi would enjoy a dedicated RFI and WIP. That said, I haven't (yet) done any space models...

 

Regards,

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would prefer real space to be separate to Sci-Fi and Fantasy but I do recognise it is a fairly quiet corner of the scale model world and therefore it tends to get lumped in with all "spacey" type model building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eric - my sister in law drove all the way from Marlow to Telford (SMW) last month - I saw her again last Sunday and totally out of the blue, she announced that of all the models on our display, the one that really caught her fancy was your little ping pong ball of a Sputnik

 

She'd already had a long chat with you over on your SIG bench, not knowing at the time that you also had this little gem on display at the Farnborough table. She's a complete space girl and is keen to catch up with you for a another chat at ModelFest next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×