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LaurieS

Model parts scratch material

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LaurieS    861

The model I am making at present is a conversion. In that conversion
I need to make one or two pieces to "stick" on the fuselage. Most
include sharpish edges so it needs something relatively hard when set.

As they are all one offs I just need a modelling material which I can
roughly shape and then sand to the exact ? shape needed.
1/48 scale.


Any experience or advice much appreciated.
 

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Schwarz-Brot    198

I'd use fine Milliput. Easy to work with and very sandable. Fine Fimo would also work well after baking. It becomes very hard and is then easy to sand.

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Scratchbuilder    216
Posted (edited)

Ordinary Yellow-green Milliput is perfectly good enough for that job.  Use files instead of sanding to keep a nice crisp edge. Keep the files cleaned with file card, pennies from a tool supplier.  If the part looks like separating from the main body, run a little thin superglue in the crack between. CA LOVES Milliput.

Failing that use Ureol (also known as Renshape) which is a chemical wood as used by patternmakers.  I can send you some if you can't get it.  Once again, as it's a self skinning foam, CA loves it.

 

Good luck with the scratchbuilding...so fulfilling when you've fashioned something with your own hands and eyes.

 

Martin

Edited by Scratchbuilder

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LaurieS    861
Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Schwarz-Brot said:

I'd use fine Milliput. Easy to work with and very sandable. Fine Fimo would also work well after baking. It becomes very hard and is then easy to sand.

Thanks SB.

 

7 minutes ago, Scratchbuilder said:

Ordinary Yellow-green Milliput is perfectly good enough for that job.  Use files instead of sanding to keep a nice crisp edge. Keep the files cleaned with file card, pennies from a tool supplier.  If the part looks like separating from the main body, run a little thin superglue in the crack between. CA LOVES Milliput.

Failing that use Ureol (also known as Renshape) which is a chemical wood as used by patternmakers.  I can send you some if you can't get it.  Once again, as it's a self skinning foam, CA loves it.

 

Good luck with the scratchbuilding...so fulfilling when you've fashioned something with your own hands and eyes.

 

Martin

Thanks Martin. Found that about the filing.f. Just getting rounded areas on what I was aiming for flat tops.

 

My first attempt. Needed a little more work as the scale of the photo shows looked OK in the real.

All sorted and now C/Ad to the fuselage. Well pleased with Lilliput.

 

The big lump is where I got the contour from the fuselage when soft. Should have made very smooth

before pressing it on the fuselage.

 

http://meek9y.jpg K5QYtj.jpg 

 

 

 

Edited by LaurieS

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albergman    410

Laurie

 

Martin and I both use Renshape and it is a wonderful medium for scartchbuilding parts.    It is, however, VERY expensive so I'm going to suggest an alternative that is quite similar.   There are several companies now making a synthetic wood for use in decking or docks ... impervious to water, UV radiation and every other scourge known to man ... if you believe the advertising.    Here's the best bit, many of these companies offer free samples of their products.   I suggest you Google synthetic/composite wood and see if you can source some samples for yourself.

 

FYI ... this boat hull is entirely made from glued and screwed together planks left over from a neighbour's deck project!

 

31509694741_a42ae72be3_z.jpg

 

became ...

 

30100117733_15bd927551_z.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Frank

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LaurieS    861
1 minute ago, albergman said:

Laurie

 

Martin and I both use Renshape and it is a wonderful medium for scartchbuilding parts.    It is, however, VERY expensive so I'm going to suggest an alternative that is quite similar.   There are several companies now making a synthetic wood for use in decking or docks ... impervious to water, UV radiation and every other scourge known to man ... if you believe the advertising.    Here's the best bit, many of these companies offer free samples of their products.   I suggest you Google synthetic/composite wood and see if you can source some samples for yourself.

 

FYI ... this boat hull is entirely made from glued and screwed together planks left over from a neighbour's deck project!

 

31509694741_a42ae72be3_z.jpg

 

became ...

 

30100117733_15bd927551_z.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Frank

Thanks Frank . I will have a look at the Renshape. Thanks for your interest and info.

 

Laurie

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Scratchbuilder    216
Posted (edited)

I told you all, Frank is  a magician<G>

 

I have used Frank's suggested decking briefly and find it promising.

Where I would argue with him is the cost of Renshape. I bought a piece a foot square  from ebay for £10. I have also been given such a piece as an off cut from a rapid prototyping company for nothing several times.

Today, I picked up some huge pieces, once used as tooling for vacuum-formed Aston Martin interior trims.  All mine for the dismantling and taking away.  More than I will ever be able to use.  It filled my little car and it  was three wheelbarrow-loads from car to shed!

So, I can easily send you some for postage only.

 

Cheers,

Martin

Edited by Scratchbuilder

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LaurieS    861
1 hour ago, Scratchbuilder said:

I told you all, Frank is  a magician<G>

 

I have used Frank's suggested decking briefly and find it promising.

Where I would argue with him is the cost of Renshape. I bought a piece a foot square  from ebay for £10. I have also been given such a piece as an off cut from a rapid prototyping company for nothing several times.

Today, I picked up some huge pieces, once used as tooling for vacuum-formed Aston Martin interior trims.  All mine for the dismantling and taking away.  More than I will ever be able to use.  It filled my little car and it  was three wheelbarrow-loads from car to shed!

So, I can easily send you some for postage only.

 

Cheers,

Martin

That is very nice of you Martin. As you will appreciated as I asked for advice I do not do

much scratch building. In this case it is part of a conversion of an Chinook helicopter for an HS1 to HS2

In this case just one piece and at 1/48 scale so very small pieces. Most models of this kind have a

number of companies who produce conversion sets. In this case as it is an old model there are

none.

 

Probably some time before I need to do any more. So for the moment I will keep to the Milliput.

Thanks for you advice and for the time taken to give the information. It is very much appreciated.

 

Regards

 

Laurie

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Scratchbuilder    216

Laurie,

You're very welcome.  

Helping out with ideas and experience is the only reason for people like me to be on here after a (near)lifetime of doing it for a living!

Oddly after a similar time avoiding them, I now find myself making two kits!  Life is suddenly too short, but I do have a scratchbuilt project on the go and my Contrail TSR2 has so many corrections it's almost as much work as a scratchbuild.  Correcting with the essential use of a lathe seems rather more than kitbashing!  I just wish it was a 48th scale one.

 

Cheers,

Martin

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LaurieS    861

Well now Martin, in my 79 year, live in a flat which I have a bedroom as a model room/office. 1/48

is largest especially as I have two projects. The first a diorama of all aircraft and vehicles in use in Afghanistan.

About 14 models. On no. ten the Chinook.

 

Then similarly for the Falklands. About 8 models. Managed to get a very old model a little Wasp helicopter.

 

Love to do larger although I have renovated real, 1:1 scale, two 33 feet motor cruisers and altered a few more

and sailed (motored) the seven seas (actually 1). One of the best times in my life around all the foreign ports

around Jersey and the southern coast of the UK.

 

Laurie

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