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Shar2

Model T LCP. 1:35

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Model T LCP

ICM 1:35

boxart.jpg

 

One of the most numerous and famous cars in the world’s history was the Model T, produced by the Ford Motor Company. These cars were widely used on all fronts during WWI. In particular the Australian Mounted Division had some British Ford production Model T cars with Lewis machine guns mounted. These vehicles, called the LCP, (Light Car Patrol), saw combat in Egypt and Palestine in 1917 and 1918.

 

The Model

The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are two sprues of light grey styrene and, in a separate poly bag, one clear sprue.  On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash.  There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing.  The sprue gates attaching items like the the exhaust are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if you’re not careful. 

 

spruea.jpg

 

The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, fan belt, dynamo, exhaust manifold, cooling fan, cooling pipes, and other sundry items.  The radiator is moulded together with the front axle and just needs the radiator grille glued to it to complete the assembly. The radiator/axle is then glued to the front of the floor pan/chassis along with four eyebolts/engine mounting bolts. The two part fuel tank is then assembled and fitted to the chassis, along with the engine assembly. The rear axle, drive shaft and differential are built up from only three parts and fited to the underside of the chassis along with the two piece exhaust/silencer unit. The front and rear axle support frames are then added, as is the steering rack. The four wheels, moulded as single parts are glued to the axles and the instructions move to the body work.

 

sprueb.jpg

 

The truck bed is made up of the bed, sides, front and rear sections, in addition to the outer curved panels, bench seat and rolled up canvas cover. The gear stick and steering column are then fitted to the chassis as is the truck bed assembly. The two part battery is fitted to the driving compartment bulkhead, along with the coaming, doors and three foot pedals. This assembly is then fitted into position between the truck bed and engine compartment. Each of the two part bonnet sections are fitted with grab handles, then glued together, before being fitted to the engine bay. If you’re very careful, the modeller could cut the lower section of one side of the bonnet and fold it up along the hinge line to show off the engine. Each of the two styles of headlights and single tail light are assembled, as is the steering wheel and column and seat back/bulkhead. The machine gun mount is glued into position on the passenger side and fitted with the three piece Lewis machine gun. The model is completed with the fitting of the spare tyre, the headlights/tail light, a three piece storage box and three piece water container.

 

clear.jpg

 

Decals

The small decal sheet contains identification numbers for two vehicles and a small crest for the radiator. The two vehicles are both painted in the overall sand scheme.

 

  • Model T LCP, Dead Sea Region, Palestine 1918
  • Model T LCP, Palestine 1918

 

decals.jpg

 

Conclusion

It’s good to see these rather unusual vehicles being released, particularly for the WWI aficionados and also remembers the role played by the Australian forces during the Great War. Whilst not a complicated kit, certainly by ICM standards, it looks like it will build into a nice little model.

 

Review sample courtesy of logo.gif

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The Light Car Patrols were not just Australian, in fact, the Aussies  were pretty disappointed when they saw the condition of some of the Ts they took over from the British LCP . The box art does however look like the restored / recreated Australian LCP one.

 

 There is a marvellous book on the subject.  The famed RR armoured cars weren't up to the job.  The LCP pioneered many of the innovations credited to the LRDG, who had access to the earlier units papers.

http://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/light-car-patrols-1916-19.html

 

Not many of the Ts in the book look like that on the box art, it's a subject ideal for the weatherers!  As long as there was still 4 wheels, an engine and most of the chassis, the LCP used it.

 

I wonder whether the LCP is not so well known because Henry Ford was vehemently against the use of "his" cars in warfare?

 

Cheers

Will

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Thanks for that further information Will. There didn't seem to be much information on the web when I searched. I think it was more a case of Henry Ford hating the British rather than having his cars used in warfare. He wouldn't supply any Ford made vehicles to us during WW2.

 

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The more I learn of Henry Ford, the more he sounds like a complete tosser. Now you tell me he hated the Brits. Why? And during the first few years of WW2 when the US wasn't yet completely involved (pre-Pearl Harbor) he was the face of the Isolationist movement. I think it was called America First or something? He may have been quite the industrial entrepreneur but he really doesn't sound like a very nice man. 

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18 hours ago, Shar2 said:

Thanks for that further information Will. There didn't seem to be much information on the web when I searched. I think it was more a case of Henry Ford hating the British rather than having his cars used in warfare. He wouldn't supply any Ford made vehicles to us during WW2.

 

 

28 minutes ago, Basosz said:

The more I learn of Henry Ford, the more he sounds like a complete tosser. Now you tell me he hated the Brits. Why? And during the first few years of WW2 when the US wasn't yet completely involved (pre-Pearl Harbor) he was the face of the Isolationist movement. I think it was called America First or something? He may have been quite the industrial entrepreneur but he really doesn't sound like a very nice man. 

Hated the British for political reasons - I'll say nowt more; don't want the thread locked

Henry was also very dishonest in his business dealings

He tried to make all US car makers pay him royalties for building their own cars

He played the pacifist but complained bitterly and legally when his company wasn't allocated government war machine contracts

oh, so much more

 

Back on topic.

A nice subject.

I recently converted an Airfix 1/32 Ford Model T to a Palestine Scout Car.

Desert%20Ford%20Model%20T%2C%2009s-Th.jp

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You want to read "The American Axis: Henry Ford, Charles Lindbergh, and the Rise of the Third Reich " by Max Wallace. Very interesting.

 

Julien

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