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bzn20

New model 737 The 230 seat Max 10

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 50 years and two months  later..It gets bigger and bigger. A 230 seater . Not much of a Baby now !

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40325015

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in size but the 707 was only 170 PAX in HD, usually less and not with the major Carriers though. The range was much longer too. If they haven't lengthened the u/c legs tail scrapes must be pretty close. Ever seen pics of the proposed 707-800 ? On par with the DC-8 Super 61 and 63 the under cart hadn't changed and would have needed a wing root redesign for housing the wheels. DC-8- 62 and 63s, apart from increased track  on the mains (and a new wing design) remained the same length which was quite high off the ground at the start.

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Guessing Ryanair will be a early customer. So we'll all get to experience it soon.

 

Hard to believe the 737 is in production for fifty years. While the new models are a world apart from the 737-100, the shape remains more or less the same. 

 

I don't think anyone back could have imagined that airliners would remain so similar looking half a century later. As a kid I would have expected everything to look a bit concorde like by now or indeed Star Trek stuff. In fact as a youngster looking forward to being a pilot I was worried that aircraft would be replaced by something even faster by the time I grew up. I needn't have worried.

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On ‎20‎/‎06‎/‎2017 at 4:20 PM, noelh said:

Guessing Ryanair will be a early customer. So we'll all get to experience it soon......

 

You speak for yourself! Never flown them; although I fly a lot I prefer other carriers!

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35 minutes ago, Agent K said:

 

You speak for yourself! Never flown them; although I fly a lot I prefer other carriers!

 

Your day will come muhaha :lol:  It's hard to avoid Ryanair. Me and 130 million other customers think otherwise. I once saved 700 quid on flights and car hire by flying with them. The economic logic can't be avoided. This year I'm off to Italy for the holidays. After extensive research, it came down to Ryanair at the nearest airport, Ryanair at next nearest airport or paying silly money at an airport further away at a seriously inconvenient time in the morning. Game over. Besides I never had a problem with Ryanair and now with it's new cuddly friendlier image it should be better. 

 

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57 minutes ago, noelh said:

 

Your day will come muhaha :lol:  .........

 

 

As long as I stay working for a large airline group then I can avoid that day!!!! :D

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2 hours ago, noelh said:

 

 Besides I never had a problem with Ryanair and now with it's new cuddly friendlier image it should be better.

 

 

I had a problem with Ryanair when they cancelled my flight home from Paris on a Sunday and offered me a replacement the following Wednesday morning. That was a long time ago, buts it an experience that leaves a bad taste.

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On 20/6/2017 at 5:20 PM, noelh said:

Guessing Ryanair will be a early customer. So we'll all get to experience it soon.

 

Hard to believe the 737 is in production for fifty years. While the new models are a world apart from the 737-100, the shape remains more or less the same. 

 

I don't think anyone back could have imagined that airliners would remain so similar looking half a century later. As a kid I would have expected everything to look a bit concorde like by now or indeed Star Trek stuff. In fact as a youngster looking forward to being a pilot I was worried that aircraft would be replaced by something even faster by the time I grew up. I needn't have worried.

 

That airliners still look so similar to what they were 50 years ago is to me the proof that objects evolve in a way similar to lifeforms: some configurations are more successful than others in fulfilling certain specifications, these configurations survive while the others are abandoned. As long as the specifications remain the same, the general configuration remain the same. The good old Boeing design was right in a number of important areas, they tweaked some details (actually a lot of details...) to follow the more exacting requests in terms of fuel economy and so on and here we have yet another 737 variant. There's a reason why this design is still flying today while other configurations are long gone...

 

And yes, I'll probably fly on this as soon as Ryanair gets theirs :D

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On ‎23‎/‎06‎/‎2017 at 12:24, Agent K said:

You speak for yourself! Never flown them; although I fly a lot I prefer other carriers!

Unfortunately, when Greedy O'Leary is the only airline flying out of your local airport to the UK, the only alternative is the train or a 12 hour drive.

I just wonder if this new aircraft's seating configuration will mean that my knees will be tucked up even further under my chin!

 

John.

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Isn't the evolution of the 737 due in part to 'grandfather rights', where the 3rd generation (not so) baby Boeing piggybacks on the original type certificate, rather than having a clean sheet all-new design?  

 

Trevor

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Posted (edited)

Not sure Trevor. I would have thought the -300 was a new type...Wing ? engines for sure to the -800. At some point Avionics were all new but not being a Fairy trade I wouldn't know for sure. The NGs might have carried it on . Are the -8 747s a new type Cert?

Haven't the MAX series got Carbon Fibre every where like the 787 ?

Edited by bzn20

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It must be Close to 20 years since I last flew in a 737, since then only singular return flights with the 146, Fokker 100 and Canadair, with the vast majority of miles in 320 series machines.

I clearly recall that when I visited a Lufthansa Technik facility in the 90s, the guide pointed out that Boeings were built like aircraft were in the 30s, with structures mostly built from laminated and rivetted alu, while Airbus extensively used chemical milling for weight reasons. I assume Boeing has also adopted the more conventional advanced processes apart from Composites, as this will have been essential to save weight ? If true that would mean that essentially the shape remains the same/similar, with bones and Skin entirely different. Rather ironic that Lufthansa was so instrumental in launching the 737 ...

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Posted (edited)

Yes. Acid  (chemical) dipping was used on the BAe146 and Airbus. Westland's at their Weston-Super-Mare site had both contracts. Depending on material spec. so many seconds dipped equalled so many mm or parts of  eaten by the acid in all dimensions, accurate reducing too. So the panel had to be bigger before the dip in LxDxB so it "shrunk" to the required size. The areas not to be "attacked" by the acid was masked in sprayable rubbery substance. I did a panel, .25" Alu plate, masked it and cut out the areas to be "eaten" and  a 5 ish second dip. I had my very own etching of Stevie Wonder !

 

Milling from solid Billet was a Vicker's thing on huge milling beds, I saw them cutting the VC10 wing planks at Weybridge when I was in ATC 11F Sqn , Brooklands in 68 ish. Very strong and thousands of fasteners (rivets/Hiloks , bolts etc.) not required.  While Boeings were made of thin gauge Coke tins and being stripped for replacement parts or repairs the VC10 spent less time in the hangar, much less !

Edited by bzn20

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On 6/27/2017 at 0:57 PM, Max Headroom said:

Isn't the evolution of the 737 due in part to 'grandfather rights', where the 3rd generation (not so) baby Boeing piggybacks on the original type certificate, rather than having a clean sheet all-new design?  

 

Trevor

 

I think that must be part of it, Trevor, though as BZN says the later major evolutions may have 'updated' the type certificate.  

In appearance it is indeed all but a twin engined 707 now!

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