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BIG X

HELP - Smoke staining - How do I do it???

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I have been playing with the following - with no joy - humbrol enamel black wash / humbrol smoke weathering powder / grated black pastel / HB pencil - trying to make exhaust and gun port smoke stains.  I have tried brushes / cotton buds / eyeshadow sponge applicators / a wet finger etc.  I'm obviously doing something majorly wrong...  HELP:please:

I am working on an acrylic gloss varnished surface by the way...

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you might want matt surface.. also, these stains need really careful study,  and in many cases less is  more

 

gun staining....not as prominent as say in the Battle of Britain film....

battleofbritain22.jpg

 

fc25d7d239c6a90303827c39779549a3.jpg

 

and these dramatic images colour peoples idea

see

 

On 2012-4-6 at 02:52, Daniel Cox said:

Hi All,

Here are some pics, please do enjoy;

0001_c.jpg

0002_c.jpg

0003_c.jpg

0004_c.jpg

0005_c.jpg

0006_c.jpg

1800x1200 pixel versions of what is shown above can be found here: https://picasaweb.google.com/112812486695617614040/Crops

Cheers,

Daniel.

 

 

exhaust vary,depending on how the aircraft is flown, and on the fuel.

hard use leads to black stains,  long flights with 'leaned out' fuel mixtures often are pale grey brown, 

 

here's a Hurricane with both

6975847692_a7ee9b332b_o.jpgHurricane at 7th. Photo Recon Group. by Etienne du Plessis, on Flickr

 

 

 

a Lanc with both

7809630994_a590554d7f_o.jpgAvro Lancaster     1942. by Etienne du Plessis, on Flickr

here's all the lanc  pics,  https://www.flickr.com/search/?w=8270787@N07&q=lancaster

hint, change the name at the end in address bar to see others

eg Spitfire

https://www.flickr.com/search/?w=8270787@N07&q=spitfire

 

Remember this stuff gets cleaned off during servicing,  and also has distinctive patterns,  the Hurricane and Lanc (note the outer two  exhaust go under the wing, due to airflow,  see how  many models have all 8 ...)

 

Sorry if not a  direct answer, but I suspect some of your frustration may come from really not looking at what you are trying to represent more closely (and apologies if you are) as you talk about a lot of black,  you may want to  do this over a matt finish, to give some 'bite'  and try chalk  pastels, easy to  clean off if you don't like the result.

 

Others will hopefully pitch in with some other hints and tips.

 

HTH

T

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks Troy - great images.  I know what I'm trying to achieve and I know I will be using a mix of blacks / browns / greys and whites even.  I have seen some fantastic finishes on the forum and I agree that 'less is more'.  The problems I am having are a bit like this - but not solely...

 

  • dry powder substances just look like 'powder' and don't hold to the surface
  • wet mediums look too dark and then just completely wipe away leaving a dirty area - not a 'streak'

I think I need some links to videos - I think this is the kind of thing you can't 'write down' - you need to see it...

 

I really appreciate the info above - it has only inspired me more - thanks - Steve.

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Progress - I popped out to Hobbycraft and picked up the Tamiya weathering master set B.

 

SNOW / SOOT / RUST - it goes on like eyeshadow with a similar sponge applicator - thank heavens for that - I was going loopy :mental: but this appears to have sorted the issue.

 

Now I just need to remember Troy's wise words...

 

REPEAT AFTER ME - less is more...  less is more... less is more... :worthy:

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There is a weathering powder that should do the job for you. If you google Carr's Weathering powders it should come up. They've been around for years but seem to be exclusively in model railway outlets, which is what they were originally intended for. They have a very slight oily texture which tends to make them stick better when applied with a brush. Even if you wipe them off, they leave a slight stain.

 

John.

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I use a mixture of things.

charcoal pencils (derwent)

both white and black, not sure of the numbers off the top of my head.

white oxide from life colour. (Tensochrom)

smoke from tamiya.

regular black acrylic paint.

 

hairy sticks mostly, bit of airbrush.

dab of dry brushing. And good old fashioned drawing.........

normally works best on a Matt base.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bullbasket said:

There is a weathering powder that should do the job for you. If you google Carr's Weathering powders it should come up. They've been around for years but seem to be exclusively in model railway outlets, which is what they were originally intended for. They have a very slight oily texture which tends to make them stick better when applied with a brush. Even if you wipe them off, they leave a slight stain.

 

John.

That is a good shout - my two local model shops are really more geared for Hornby than Airfix and Hattons is only a half hour away.  These Tamiya 'eyeshadows' look pretty good too - but hey - hang the expense - I'll try everything to get a good result with my limited talents :)

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24 minutes ago, It's a disease said:

I use a mixture of things.

charcoal pencils (derwent)

both white and black, not sure of the numbers off the top of my head.

white oxide from life colour. (Tensochrom)

smoke from tamiya.

regular black acrylic paint.

 

hairy sticks mostly, bit of airbrush.

dab of dry brushing. And good old fashioned drawing.........

normally works best on a Matt base.

 

 

I reckon the matt base might be the key - sods law says I have glossed over the final decal coat - so an overall matt coat before weathering seems required.  Then another matt coat after I suppose...

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I think there are many different ways of skinning this particular cat.

 

I'm no expert (by a long chalk) but I use weathering powder 'stippled' onto the matt varnish coat with a reasonably stiff paintbrush* which I find gives the slightly sooty appearance I think I see on photos of the real thing, and I imagine is caused by particles in the exhaust sticking to the air frame.

 

Less is more, so I try to get the basic shape of the exhaust stain that I see in pictures (each aircraft seems to have its own distinctive pattern, driven by airflow I guess) by building up the weathering powder in a number of light applications, stopping as soon as I get the first inking that I've done enough.

 

*not a specific stippling brush, they don't quite give the effect I'm looking for, but they are very useful for brush painting mottle camouflage schemes

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