Welcome to Britmodeller.com

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more! This message will be removed once you have signed in.

This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

  • Announcements

    • Mike

      Switched Identities   18/06/17

      If you are still having problems logging in and remaining under your own username following the DDoS attack last week, you need to log off, clear your browser's cache, and restart your browser to ensure you clear all the old files from your temporary area.  Then you should be sorted.
billybookcase

Argos (the shop) a warning

75 posts in this topic
2 hours ago, Mikemx said:

 

Ebay is a bit complicated. I've no idea how Argos get their money from Ebay exactly but it must be something to do with that. On Ebay UK, if you want to be a top rated seller with all the benefits your supposed to get from that (inc listing discount) you have to offer free post within the UK. Obviously we can't afford to really give the post away so we simply add it to the cost of each item and that covers post, packing and Ebay selling costs. You can separate the postage and item price but you'll lose some benefits, either way Ebay screws you. Thing is, if Argos get a cut of the postage, what happens to Royal Mail, they still deliver what ever it is to Argos. Told you it was complicated! Check out our vendors posts Steve, there's lots of new things in stock and on their way to possibly help you with stash building! :)

 

thanks

Mike 

 

 

All the stuff I've bought off Fleabay delivered to Argos has been a normal delivery by either Royal Mail or a courier, the address for the Argos is on the label with my name on it so I would expect Argos doesn't make any money out of it. What they do is take possible extra sales through people just going in the doors, even more so now that more and more are being set up in Sainsburys. When you think of it there isn't much to do, courier turns up with parcel, bod signs for it, he then scans or keys in the number and then the customer gets email/text saying it turned up, that's how it happens where I work, and no it isn't Argos

The click and collect for me has been so handy that even if identical item is available cheaper off another seller but doesn't have the click and collect I'll still go with the pricier option which does have click and collect. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's still an extra opportunity for errors though. It might be ok for parcels but like I said must of our stuff is letter/large letter post, so there's not much point in sending something to Argos when it can go through a normal letterbox, I suspect that would annoy for more people than it would make happy. Also it's not convenient for everyone, where we used to live we had a Royal Mail delivery office where we could collect from but Argos was miles away. Where we are now, again Argos is miles away but we can re-arrange Royal Mail deliveries without leaving our homes, so for us, regular Royal Mail delivery is still better.

 

thanks

Mike 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/16/2017 at 2:46 AM, Skodadriver said:

I doubt if anybody can really explain Argos.  

 

Basically you go into what looks like a shop in which there are a number of tables/desks each with a large catalogue chained to it.  You rummage through the catalogue in the hope of finding what you want and if you are successful you write the relevant code number on a small slip of paper.  You then stand in a queue for a checkout where somebody will inspect the slip of paper, take your money and issue you with another piece of paper.  You then stand in another queue until you are called to your "Collection Point".  At that stage your purchase will probably appear sliding down a chute or something similar, an employee will pass it to you and stamp your second slip of paper.  You are then free to leave.

Ahh, I remember encountering that exact system!

 

Russia. 1988.

Diabolical and perplexing at the exact same time...

 

 

 

I had been pondering recently, how the communist countries had embraced capitalism, but nowadays capitalist countries are being dragged into communist/socialist lunacy.

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe most of the cost to Royal Mail is in the delivery from sorting office to front door. I imagine that delivering en masse to Argos reduces this cost by a few pence, some of which they probably pay to Argos.

I'm only speculating, but I doubt Argos would let their competitors use their outlets for delivery for nothing.

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, hairystick said:

I had been pondering recently, how the communist countries had embraced capitalism, but nowadays capitalist countries are being dragged into communist/socialist lunacy.

I object to you describing socialists as lunatics – that is a political statement and not suitable for this forum.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh, but everyone loves Argos when they’re knocking out model kits for a bargain.

Remember when they knocked out 1/32 Arrows Hawks for a song?

:P

 

 

Mart

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Retail internal hierarchy:

 

birds.jpeg

 

Always bear this in mind when entering a shop. The quality of service you receive depends in large measue on what moral is like within a particular store. If you have a good management team, that filters down to customer interaction. If you have a bad one..... that also filters through.:hmmm:

 

Mike.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MikeR said:

Retail internal hierarchy:

 

birds.jpeg

 

Always bear this in mind when entering a shop. The quality of service you receive depends in large measue on what moral is like within a particular store. If you have a good management team, that filters down to customer interaction. If you have a bad one..... that also filters through.:hmmm:

 

Mike.

 

Hmm, I don't know that the morals of the store team are too important, the morale, on the other hand, may make a difference.  ;)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

:P

 

In all seriousness, though, morality can be a factor as it can and does lead to certain patterns of behaviour, both on a personal level and within the corporate culture as a whole. Those patterns of behaviour can be corrosive to morale within a store if left uncorrected. The best employers make sure that such a situation is nipped in the bud if it rears it's head.

 

Mike.

Edited by MikeR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-6-17 at 10:12 AM, hairystick said:

Ahh, I remember encountering that exact system!

 

Russia. 1988.

Diabolical and perplexing at the exact same time...

 

 

 

I had been pondering recently, how the communist countries had embraced capitalism, but nowadays capitalist countries are being dragged into communist/socialist lunacy.

 

Selecting your goods at one counter and then paying for them at another has absolutely nothing to do with communism or any other ism.  It used to be common practice here about a hundred years ago, way before self-service was invented.  Although in the good old days it came with the refinement that the employers so mistrusted their staff that when you paid, they had to take the money to a separate cashier and bring back the exact change.  Until not very long ago some shops still had traces of the pneumatic tubes that were used to move cash about to make it quicker.

 

Argos still uses this system because it saves them having to lay out goods in the shop and keep the displays tidy.  The main reason I try not to shop there is that this gives you no chance to inspect what you're buying - you have to take all your information from the description in the catalogue.  OK for a clothes airer, but I'd never buy furniture there.

 

I think Russia used the separate payment system because they'd heard about shops but not caught up with the latest manuals.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think I'd confuse Moscow's Gum store with our Argos ! Tennis Racket week followed  6 months later by tennis ball week...Ivan forgot where he put his "Bat"!

 

The Argos staff... 4 taking the money, nobody shifting stuff from conveyor to shelf for the customers now 8 deep.. " Excuse me.. Can you put half the people on giving the goods out"? Puzzled looks. "We can't leave here with out our stuff and its filling up with us waiting towards the door" ! Two staff with a monk on and sloping shoulders  begrudgingly come across to do their job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, pigsty said:

..  It used to be common practice here about a hundred years ago, way before self-service was invented.  Although in the good old days it came with the refinement that the employers so mistrusted their staff that when you paid, they had to take the money to a separate cashier and bring back the exact change.  Until not very long ago some shops still had traces of the pneumatic tubes that were used to move cash about to make it quicker.

...

As a self-employed gofer of tiddler age in the 60s I went to many a shop, eg; hardware, butchers, drapers, to get items and I ordered goods at one counter, picked up at another counter and maybe paid at a third counter.

A large hardware store in Portadown was still like this until it closed just a few years ago having been there for 120 years

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I was in Italy, you paid a cashier, then took your receipt to get the goods, and that was just for food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

Last time I was in Italy, you paid a cashier, then took your receipt to get the goods, and that was just for food.

 

Went into Mcdoodles the other day for the first time in many a year. Was a bit suprised to see they had gone all Argos with pay here and collect there when your number is called! :o

 

Regards

 

Steve

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shops like having women cashiers ------------------men are programmed to just hand over the cash and do what their told  :penguin:

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In some cases it's actually built into the architecture - in the store I work in the female locker room and toilets are twice the size of their male equivalents.

 

Mike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you are buying a product, they ask for your details for marketing purposes (whatever they say), and you actually pass them your real details, how quaint !!

 

False name, postcode from a house I left in Bristol years ago, 'amended' E-Mail address evry time.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if Foyles in London are still operating the same system, but when buying books there some years ago you took the book(s) to the counter where you received a receipt.  You then took the receipt to a central cash desk, paid your money and got the receipt stamped.  You took the stamped receipt back to the book counter where your purchases were waiting for you nicely wrapped.  It seemed a rather archaic system, but it did work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, 593jones said:

I don't know if Foyles in London are still operating the same system, but when buying books there some years ago you took the book(s) to the counter where you received a receipt.  You then took the receipt to a central cash desk, paid your money and got the receipt stamped.  You took the stamped receipt back to the book counter where your purchases were waiting for you nicely wrapped.  It seemed a rather archaic system, but it did work.

Not when I was in last few months ago

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I remember a brief working trip to the former Soviet Union in the early 1990s when I recall even in a self service shop I took the goods I wanted to a counter and the goods were taken off me and I was handed a receipt. I then went to a second counter where I made a payment and my receipt was marked as having paid. I then visited a third counter where I presented the receipt and was reunited with my purchase. Our minders found our bemusement at this hilarious and we imagined it could only be a work creation scheme.

 

As for handing email details over well it's entirely up to you and there's no need to make a false address, simply refuse. I often do this but for companies that you can trust, and these in my experience include Argos and Screwfix as despite my having given them my details as requested they do not send marketing emails, I do supply my details.

 

This is a result of a conversation I had a few years ago when buying "white goods" in a store of our leading retailer of such things. As usual I declined the opportunity to be marketed at by giving contact details but the helpful lady pointed out that they would send me a copy of the receipt as an email which meant that should I wish to claim under the (then) sale of goods act proof of purchase would be easy. However a more persuasive argument was that should there be a safety recall on this electrical item, which had a motor and a heating element they would be able to contact me. 

 

That's important to me. A work colleague of mine lost his house when a fridge caught fire and I know as an engineer that these things do happen.

 

However I agree that the customer experience, stock levels and website of Argos is completely s****

 

Edited by Pigpen
Poor grammar and spelling !
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MikeR said:

In some cases it's actually built into the architecture - in the store I work in the female locker room and toilets are twice the size of their male equivalents.

 

Mike.

ah, but weeemen always have to have someone go with them to the loo. Men go it alone. Therefore the weemens place needs to be twice the size.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm probably unique amongst the replies here in that I have actually worked for Argos, albeit indirectly. I worked for the transport company Wincanton who have (or had, it was a few years ago) the contract to deliver to shops and other warehouses. Argos had a strange way of ordering stock. You'd think that the managers of each individual outlet would be best placed to know what items were selling best, what they were running short of and therefore, what to order. Not so! The people at the main distribution centre decided what each shop needed, regardless of what their stock levels were. That is why we used to have the utterly ridiculous situation where we would turn up at a store, reverse our 40 foot vehicle up to the loading door, and off load a dozen Christmas trees in April. Once they had been delivered, the shop would then load the returns onto said 40 footer, which would be the Christmas trees that had been delivered to them the week before. Even if they were chocker block with items that they didn't need, they were not allowed to refuse a delivery. I've been to shops where stock was piled high everywhere, blocking aisles and fire exits all because of the stupid policy of management. 

My son also works for Argos in one of their main distribution warehouses, and has done for more than 15 years. He is a permanent employee and is directly employed by Argos as opposed to the rest of the workforce which is agency. Over the period of time that he has been employed by Argos, they have been trying their best to get rid of him and all of the other permanent members of staff by constantly changing their contracts, conditions, shift schedules and holidays. What they want is a workforce made up entirely of agency workers for the simple reason that the agency works are paid around £4 and hour less than the permanent staff. They don't want staff who are experienced and know what they are doing, they want cheapness, so the old saying about "if you pay peanuts............." was never truer.

So the next time that you are in Argos and can't get an item that you want, it's not necessarily the fault of the shop staff.

 

John.   

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bullbasket said:

I'm probably unique amongst the replies here in that I have actually worked for Argos, albeit indirectly. I worked for the transport company Wincanton who have (or had, it was a few years ago) the contract to deliver to shops and other warehouses. Argos had a strange way of ordering stock. You'd think that the managers of each individual outlet would be best placed to know what items were selling best, what they were running short of and therefore, what to order. Not so! The people at the main distribution centre decided what each shop needed, regardless of what their stock levels were. That is why we used to have the utterly ridiculous situation where we would turn up at a store, reverse our 40 foot vehicle up to the loading door, and off load a dozen Christmas trees in April. Once they had been delivered, the shop would then load the returns onto said 40 footer, which would be the Christmas trees that had been delivered to them the week before. Even if they were chocker block with items that they didn't need, they were not allowed to refuse a delivery. I've been to shops where stock was piled high everywhere, blocking aisles and fire exits all because of the stupid policy of management. 

My son also works for Argos in one of their main distribution warehouses, and has done for more than 15 years. He is a permanent employee and is directly employed by Argos as opposed to the rest of the workforce which is agency. Over the period of time that he has been employed by Argos, they have been trying their best to get rid of him and all of the other permanent members of staff by constantly changing their contracts, conditions, shift schedules and holidays. What they want is a workforce made up entirely of agency workers for the simple reason that the agency works are paid around £4 and hour less than the permanent staff. They don't want staff who are experienced and know what they are doing, they want cheapness, so the old saying about "if you pay peanuts............." was never truer.

So the next time that you are in Argos and can't get an item that you want, it's not necessarily the fault of the shop staff.

 

John.   

Tesco did the same in their Middlewich distribution centre in Cheshire. They got rid of the permanent UK staff and brought in foreign agency workers, presumably because it saved them money. Perhaps this is a fairly common practice for the bigger retailers?

 

thanks

Mike

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, MikeR said:

In some cases it's actually built into the architecture - in the store I work in the female locker room and toilets are twice the size of their male equivalents.

 

Mike.

 

Have a read of BS6465 at some point - It sets out WC requirements for workplaces etc. Girls need more wc's as us blokes have the option of using urinals....

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Bonhoff said:

 

Have a read of BS6465 at some point - It sets out WC requirements for workplaces etc. Girls need more wc's as us blokes have the option of using urinals....

 

Right enough, thanks for jogging my memory! I used to work in HR, so I should have remembered that.:doh:

 

Mike.:)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now