This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

  • Announcements

    • Mike

      Ongoing DDoS Attack causing Forum Slowness   26/04/17

      In case you have missed the announcement, the reason that the forum has been slow at times since the minor version update the other day is due to a Denial of Service attack, brute force attack on our email, and judging by the lag with our FTP response, that too.  If you're feeling like you're experiencing a glitch in the Matrix, you're not wrong.  This is the same MO as the attack in September 2016 that occurred when we transitioned to the new version 4 of the software.  We're currently working with US and UK cyber-crime departments, who specialise in this sort of thing, and we're hopeful that we'll be able to track them down this time by using the accumulated evidence already held.    We are pretty certain that it's a continuation of the same attack last year, only at a reduced intensity to deter people from using the site "because it's terribly slow", rather than taking it down completely, and we're also sure of the motivations of those responsible.  Spite.   Please bear with us in the interim, and wish us luck in dealing with these.... "people".
Spitfire addict

Japanese seat belts question

7 posts in this topic

As 

I ponder the application of the dreaded PE seat belts to my Zero, I was wondering which aircraft, or aircraft manufacturers e.g. Mitsubishi, Nakajima, Kawanishi, et al, applied particular set ups for their seats. The question mostly is in regard to lap belts vs lap and shoulder harness on mainstream Japanese fighters. I have noticed that for some Japanese aircraft a single belt across the chest was combined with the lap belts. Was this added after too many pilots whacked their forehead on the gun sights as was the case with the early US Navy Wildcats? There is probably a thread on this subject a mile long, but due to my technical ineptitude I couldn't find it. If anyone can link it my good friend Troy will probably find it for me. Otherwise, any help on this would be great.

Cheers

Edited by Spitfire addict
Clarification

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See David Aiken's comments on Hyperscale, quoted in part here:

"It would have been dumb, as some suggest, for the Japanese to use only lap belts...on the Zero....they HAD to use a shoulder belt. I don't have the width measurement yet it had many grommets for the belt buckle. The shoulder belt came across the left shoulder as seen in the attached blue print and illustration. The connections to hard points within the cockpit is poorly defined. Japanese sensei H. Sugiyama added more about the seat and the Type 97 Zabuton/parachute seat pack with the attached published illustration."

Link http://www.clubhyper.com/forums/forum.htm You will have to scroll down to find his response under the question about A6M2 aileron mass balances

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Chuck, it seems the IJAAF aircraft tended to have the lap belts, which Fine Molds makes replicas for the Tony and Oscar. Still not positive on the bombers though. Eduard makes a set for fighters which is a mix of lap belts and shoulder harness. But, why just lap belts for some aircraft? They didn't feel they needed parachutes for their pilots either early on.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If You look at IJN aircraft seats, there was indeed a third, or shoulder strap:

 

l_finna2.jpg

 

But the setup on Kawanishi fighters (N1K / N1K1-J / N1K2-J) intrigues me the most (those "Y belts" to the left).

 

49099.gif

 

How does that thing work? Does the head go trough there? Does some other part of you go through there?

 

Edited by warhawk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mitsubishi fighters had the lap and shoulder belt in the A5M (Claude), A6M (Zeke), and the J2M (jack).

 

 

 The  Soviet Union captured an A5M in 1939. The plane was dissembled, photographed, and test flown.

Mitsubishi-A5M-mix-5_zpsajjlt3gw.jpg

 

The shoulder belt would be mounted to the back of the seat  at the riveted plate on the upper left of the seat back.While this particular seat does not appear to have a belt, the belt can be seen in this picture.

 

A5M-Akagi-Prewar-13f-s_zpsfdpomwmp.jpg

 

This photo of an A6M (Zero) shows the lap belt and the lower portion of the shoulder belt mounted just ahead of it.

2ba28b08ce5c25fc9aa03dd2b3ce83cf_zpsour4

 

This a replica of the seat in the Planes of Fame A6M5 showing the seat belt mounting points. The lap belts seem high but the pilot would be sitting on his parachute.

zero-figher-airplane-seat_zpstdczl7qd.jp

The black frame at the bottom would not be found in a Zero, it is for mounting the seat in the hot rod in the background.B)

 

The J2M Raiden also has the belts attached to the seat. In this picture the seat belt mounting points can be seen, however the belt has been replaced by a American one. This is most likely the plane that now belongs to the Planes of Fame Museum.

9e5ab448e23ca7705d8dc256287bb2d7_zpsivze

 

Before I start a build, I obsessively pour over all the photographs that I can find. Since I have not yet started building other Japanese aircraft, I cannot help with the other belts.

 

Garry c

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, and a special thanks to Gerry who went above and beyond (as many of my Britmodeller compatriots often do) with the great pictures. I have an A5M that is in the stack so the info helps there too. I feel safe going with the setup pictured, now I just have to keep from gluing my fingers to the seat whilst I apply the belts! Now that I think of it it makes sense that naval aircraft would have the shoulder belt because of arrested carrier landings, which still doesn't explain the US Navy's lack of a shoulder harness on the early Wildcats, but I digress. I have not seen shoulder harnesses on the IJAAF fighter aircraft, perhaps the Japanese Army Airforce didn't see the need? Anyway, thanks again guys, all the best.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Japanese seat belt information has been very hard to find, it is a pleasure to share it. The captured A5M would have been land based and probably had its arresting hook removed.

Perhaps they removed the shoulder belt at the same time?  Of course the J2M was never intended to be carrier based, I guess shoulder belts were standard by then.

 

Happy to be useful,

 

Garry c

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now