Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

BIG X

HELP - My airbrush seems to be spitting water???

Recommended Posts

Can anyone help...

 

I have been airbrushing for a few weeks now & a new phenomena has occurred this morning that has me foxed.  With a full 5ml of stynlyrez primer in the cup I began to do some serious priming - BUT - after a few minutes my brush started to just spray water?  even though the cup is still fairly full.  More tests on a piece of card show the paint is coming through - but seems "diluted" & is puddling on my model & a piece of test cardboard - WEIRD!!!

 

I've just tried posting a pic - but failed miserably...

 

On further inspection of my compressor - the moisture trap (clear plastic bowl) is fogged with moisture.  I've unscrewed it & dried it out - but there was actually very little moisture in it to be fair.

 

Any ideas or things to try would be appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance - Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What airbrush and compressor setup do you have & where are you spraying ( shed, garage, kitchen??).

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, little-cars said:

What airbrush and compressor setup do you have & where are you spraying ( shed, garage, kitchen??).

 

Paul

Hi Paul,

 

I'm using the Evolution 2 in 1 with a little jet compressor - as supplied by your good self a few weeks ago.  Spraying is done in my office - centrally heated & dry as a bone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

OK, sounds like you've got a moisture build up in the hose.

 

I have seen this with a similar setup/environment several time before. Room feels dry, but there is moisture in the air and it builds up in the hose.

 

Firstly make sure the moisture trap is not clogged at the bottom. If it can't escape it has to go somewhere & that will be into the hose.

 

The simplest fix it a secondary moisture trap on the bottom of the airbrush, the sparmax silver bullet plus is a reasonably priced one and has a secondary air regulator included. It also has a valve to empty any water that it does collect.

 

http://www.modellingtools.co.uk/sparmax-silver-bullet-plus-moisture-trap-3458-p.asp

 

Hope that helps,

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Paul - that sounds feasible - I will check it out tonight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick & daft question - if there is moisture in the hose - how do I get it out???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hairdrier - blast it out for a bit?

Or leave hose in airing cupboard overnight? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Tony Oliver said:

Hairdrier - blast it out for a bit?

Or leave hose in airing cupboard overnight? 

Hi Tony - Thanks for that.  I was considering unplugging the gun & quick release connector / positioning the pump high up & hanging the hose down / set pump pressure to full strength -  then see if any moisture collects in a mug?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I had this same problem for years and solved it simply. I tried an inline water trap, but that did not work, I put a full water trap on my compressor as in the instructions and that did not work. Then I was given a physics lesson from a fellow modeler that helped me solve the problem. 

 

Air coming out of a compressor is hot due to being, well, compressed. Hot air can hold more moisture. If this hot air passes through water traps that are too close to the compressor, it stays hot and retains the moisture. Then as it moves to your airbrush it cools and the water condenses. Thus the drops of water shooting out. The solution is to put your water trap further from the compressor. Buy a length of air hose, 10 feet or so, and attach that between your compressor and the water trap. That way, the air is cooled before it goes through the trap and will give up its moisture and any moisture already given up is caught in the trap. I haven't had one drop come out since I did this. Now, if you're picky, there will be an air pressure drop due to the length of the hose, but you can correct for that by increasing the pressure coming out of the compressor. Just every so often, you need to empty the water out of the trap. 

 

It was a sure, cheap fix for me. 

Edited by gamevender

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, gamevender said:

I had this same problem for years and solved it simply. I tried and inline water trap, but that did not work, I put a full water trap on my compressor as in the instructions and that did not work. Then I was given a physics lesson fro a fellow modeler that helped me solve the problem. 

 

Air coming out of a compressor is hot due to being, well, compressed. Hot air can hold more moisture. If this hot air passes through water traps that are too close to the compressor, it stays hot and retains the moisture. Then as it moves to your airbrush it cools and the water condenses. Thus the drops of water shooting out. The solution is to put your water trap further from the compressor. Buy a length of air hose, 10 feet or so, and attach that between your compressor and the water trap. That way, the air is cooled before it goes through the trap and will give up its moisture and any moisture already given up is caught in the trap. I haven't had one drop come out since I did this. Now, if your picky, there will be an air pressure drop due to the length of the hose, but you can correct for that by increasing the pressure coming out of the compressor. Just every so often, you need to empty the water out of the trap. 

 

It was a sure, cheap fix for me. 

Physics was never my strong suit - but I get where you are coming from.  I will consider this option if I don't get an instant fix tonight - thanks for responding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK - I'm home & I've blown out the tube - done some more priming & the problem went away & then came back...

Here is my set up - pump on the floor - tube goes up - secured to the drawer side with a tube holder - then drops down free - before coming back up to the airbrush.

 

set_up.jpg

 

apologies as always for the poor image - the question is...

Does this "silver bullet" thingy have to sit directly under the airbrush - or could I order more tube & fit an extra tube holder under the desk & have it half way between the pump & the brush???

 

This is really depressing - as it is my first "real" job - all the test painting went really well - but now I have a truck covered in watery primer - OH THE FUN OF MODELLING :cry:

 

HELP!!! :please:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I switched to a pretty long, small outside diameter hose from the water trap on the compressor to the brush.

I've never had the problem since.

The long hose was actually cheaper to buy than the posh braided Iwata one as well. 

I can't remember where I got mine from, or its make, but I'm sure Paul would be able to help with that one.

Rick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Big,

I had the same problem a couple of years ago – half way through the camo on my He 219. I bought a Silver Bullet and no problems since. I bought a cheaper trap first and it fell apart after a few months. I have added a photo of mine to give you an idea where they fit.

Gorby

ca0f43b2-c770-4272-b9cd-22299c9ad232.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gorby - Well this is getting a lot of praise & how much time do you have to waste on preparation or how many models do you have to "mess up" before you say - I need one - Not a lot!!!  I've just spent 3 hours of work time & lost £16 on a model to boot.   If the gear I bought doesn't work without one - then I need it - its just a pity I didn't know on the day - because I would have added it to my order - no questions asked.  Thanks for the sound advice - question - could you fit it like this though...

 

Airbrush / quick release / tube / bullet thing / tube / moisture trap & regulator / pump???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugely informative thread if I may say so and one I have learned from. Thanks.

 

PS also reflected that a top class sable brush costs around a tenner and set up and cleaning a tad easier 😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, BIG X said:

Hi Gorby - Well this is getting a lot of praise & how much time do you have to waste on preparation or how many models do you have to "mess up" before you say - I need one - Not a lot!!!  I've just spent 3 hours of work time & lost £16 on a model to boot.   If the gear I bought doesn't work without one - then I need it - its just a pity I didn't know on the day - because I would have added it to my order - no questions asked.  Thanks for the sound advice - question - could you fit it like this though...

 

Airbrush / quick release / tube / bullet thing / tube / moisture trap & regulator / pump???

 

Only a small number of people need a secondary moisture trap, it all depends on moisture in the air and secondly how long you run the compressor for.

I would put the secondary trap on the bottom of the brush with quick release below.  This will keep the moisture trap the right way up and allow you to clear the trap of any moisture when it builds up

Badger do or used to do a trap that fitted in the middle of the air hose,but from memory it was a sealed unit.

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, little-cars said:

 

Only a small number of people need a secondary moisture trap, it all depends on moisture in the air and secondly how long you run the compressor for.

I would put the secondary trap on the bottom of the brush with quick release below.  This will keep the moisture trap the right way up and allow you to clear the trap of any moisture when it builds up

Badger do or used to do a trap that fitted in the middle of the air hose,but from memory it was a sealed unit.

 

Paul

Hi Paul - thanks a million as always for your amazing help and insight.  I did ponder the idea last night of getting a dehumidifier - but I don't think that would help as the room isn't damp (the windows never steam up even in the coldest weather).  I do think it may be down to the heat from the pump, though I never run it for more than 10 minutes max & do allow it to fully cool down.

 

Anyway it looks like the magic silver bullet is going to be the answer - thanks for the help everyone. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At first it is a bit of a pain getting used to having a large protuberance under your nice sleek airbrush, but now I use the bullet as a grip and I think it gives me a better control over the brush, so win win.

 

13 hours ago, JohnT said:

PS also reflected that a top class sable brush costs around a tenner and set up and cleaning a tad easier

I find that cars are a bit of a pain – but it's better and quicker than walking. Occasionally my airbrush and I do have a bit of a fall out, but I think the effort is well worth the end result. Plus, the Sable gets to keep its fur, where I think it looks better than stuck on the end of a stick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that I have always used compressors with tanks attached and have never had this problem, even with a fairly small air tank, I have never had anything more than the water trap on the regulator in the circuit. With a tank the moisture falls out of the air when it is pressurised in the tank plus you don't have the annoying constant rumble of the compressor all the time you are working. The Chinese produce some very cheap, quiet(ish) compressor/tank units which I have found to be pretty reliable. I use one with a reasonably large 20 litre tank that cost a bit more and it runs for about a minute once or twice in a reasonably long session.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Gorbygould said:

At first it is a bit of a pain getting used to having a large protuberance under your nice sleek airbrush, but now I use the bullet as a grip and I think it gives me a better control over the brush, so win win.

 

I find that cars are a bit of a pain – but it's better and quicker than walking. Occasionally my airbrush and I do have a bit of a fall out, but I think the effort is well worth the end result. Plus, the Sable gets to keep its fur, where I think it looks better than stuck on the end of a stick.

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Gorbygould said:

 

I find that cars are a bit of a pain – but it's better and quicker than walking. 

 

 

You have not been in Edinburgh in the rush hour then :D

 

Aye what you say is true enough - once you get the hang of it its not so bad.  Its a bit like learning to ride a bike though - you have to fall off and feel the pain a few times before you master it

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree - Edinburgh traffic can be worse than London at times - NIGHTMARE - but a lovely city non the less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here we go - silver bullet installed...

 

bullet.jpg

 

...one problem - my swanky airbrush stand is now too low for the extra length of the bullet - so it has to sit precariously close to the edge of the desk (what a whinging beggar I am).  Has the problem "gone away" or been "cured" - I'm not sure.  I have had no repeat of water shooting through (cured?) - but equally none has accumulated in the trap (gone away?).  I don't know for sure - but I'm happy & YES - it is very ergonomic in the hand.  Thanks folks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×